Greenwich (UK Parliament constituency)

Last updated

Greenwich
Former Borough constituency
for the House of Commons
United Kingdom general election 1837.svg
United Kingdom general election 1837.svg
Form 1832-1885. Extract from 1837 result: the easterly area striped.
County Greater London
18321885
Number of membersTwo
Replaced byGreenwich (see below)
Woolwich
Deptford
Created from Kent
18851997
Number of membersOne
Replaced by Greenwich & Woolwich
Created fromGreenwich
and small corner of West Kent

Greenwich was a constituency in south-east London, which returned two then (from 1885) one member (MP) to the House of Commons of the UK Parliament. It existed from 1832 to 1997. Elections used the first past the post system; when this elects more than one member it is sometimes called plurality-at-large voting.

Contents

History

From 1832 until 1885 it was a two-member constituency. Its area was in net outcome cut but it gained Kidbrooke and it was reduced to a seat under the Redistribution of Seats Act 1885 associated with the Reform Act 1884. For the 1997 general election, it was merged with part of the former Woolwich constituency to form the Greenwich and Woolwich seat.

The seat and others of the Metropolitan Board of Works area, 1885-1918 Greenwich1885.png
The seat and others of the Metropolitan Board of Works area, 1885–1918
The seat and others in the County of London 1918-49 Greenwich1918.png
The seat and others in the County of London 1918–49
wards of Greenwich Metropolitan Borough in 1916 Greenwich Met. B Ward Map 1916.svg
wards of Greenwich Metropolitan Borough in 1916
The seat and others in the County of London 1950-74 Greenwich1950.png
The seat and others in the County of London 1950–74

Its history is dominated by the area's strong maritime tradition. Its most prominent claim to fame was as the seat of William Ewart Gladstone between 1868 and 1880, and it also achieved prominence in the 1987 Greenwich by-election, when the SDP won a surprise victory.

Boundaries

1832–1885 the parishes of Greenwich; St Nicholas and St Paul Deptford; and the most populous parts of Charlton and Woolwich. [1] [2] detailed as: "From the Point at which the Royal Arsenal Canal at Woolwich joins the Thames, along the said Canal to the southern extremity thereof; thence in a straight Line to the south-western corner of the Ordnance Storekeeper's House; thence in a straight Line, in the Direction of a Stile in the footpath from Woolwich to Plumstead Common, over Sand Hill, to the Boundary of the Parish of Woolwich; thence, southward, along the boundary of the parish of Woolwich to the point at which the same meets the Boundary of the parish of Charlton; thence westward along the Boundary of the parish of Charlton to the point at which the same turns southward near the Dovor Road; thence along the Dovor Road to the nearest point of the boundary of the parish of Greenwich; thence Westward, along the boundary of the parish of Greenwich to the point at which the same turns abruptly to the south, close by the Dovor Road, thence in a straight line, in a westerly direction, to the nearest point of the boundary of the parish of Greenwich, thence westward along the boundary of the parish of Greenwich to the point at which the same meets the boundary of the parish of Saint Paul Deptford; thence southward along the boundary of the parish of Saint Paul Deptford to the point at which the same meets the Thames; thence along the Thames to the point first described." [3] The boundaries were thus in the schedules of the Parliamentary Boundaries Act 1832. [4]

1885–1918: The parishes of Greenwich, St Nicholas Deptford, Charlton, and Kidbrooke. [5]

1918–1974: The Metropolitan Borough of Greenwich.

1974–1983: The London Borough of Greenwich wards of Blackheath, Charlton, Eastcombe, Hornfair, Kidbrooke, Marsh, Park, Trafalgar, Vanbrugh, and West.

1983–1997: The London Borough of Greenwich wards of Blackheath, Charlton, Ferrier, Hornfair, Kidbrooke, Rectory Field, St Alfege, Trafalgar, Vanbrugh, and West.

Between 1983 and 1997, the constituency formed the western part of the Royal Borough of Greenwich.

Members of Parliament

MPs 1832–1885

Election1st Member1st Party2nd Member2nd Party
1832 James Whitley Deans Dundas Whig [6] [7] Edward George Barnard Radical [8] [9]
1835 John Angerstein Whig [7] [10]
1837 Matthias Wolverley Attwood Conservative [7]
1841 James Whitley Deans Dundas Whig [6] [7]
1851 by-election David Salomons Radical [11]
1852 by-election Houston Stewart Whig [12]
1852 Peter Rolt Conservative Montague Chambers Radical [11]
Feb 1857 by-election Sir William Codrington Whig
Mar. 1857 John Townsend Radical [11]
Feb. 1859 by-election David Salomons Radical [11]
1859 William Angerstein Liberal Liberal
1865 Sir Charles Tilston Bright Liberal
1868 William Ewart Gladstone Liberal
1873 by-election Sir Thomas Boord Conservative
1880 Baron Henry de Worms Conservative
1885 Representation reduced to one member

MPs since 1885

ElectionMemberParty
1885 Sir Thomas Boord Conservative
1895 Lord Hugh Cecil Conservative
1906 Richard Jackson Liberal
Jan 1910 Ion Hamilton Benn Conservative
1922 George Hume Conservative
1923 Edward Timothy Palmer Labour
1924 Sir George Hume Conservative
1929 Edward Timothy Palmer Labour
1931 Sir George Hume Conservative
1945 Joseph Reeves Labour
1959 Richard Marsh Labour
1971 by-election Guy Barnett Labour
1987 by-election Rosie Barnes Social Democratic
1992 Nick Raynsford Labour
1997 constituency abolished

Election results

Elections in the 1830s

1832 general election: Greenwich [13] [7]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig James Whitley Deans Dundas 1,633 39.6 N/A
Radical Edward George Barnard 1,442 35.0 N/A
Whig John Angerstein 1,03325.1N/A
Radical Frederick George Hammond [14] 150.4N/A
Turnout 2,39188.1N/A
Registered electors 2,714
Majority1914.6N/A
Whig win (new seat)
Majority4099.9N/A
Radical win (new seat)
1835 general election: Greenwich [13] [7]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig John Angerstein 1,826 45.8 18.8
Radical Edward George Barnard 1,102 27.6 7.8
Conservative Matthias Wolverley Attwood 1,06326.6New
Turnout 2,21087.80.3
Registered electors 2,516
Majority72418.1+13.5
Whig hold Swing 7.5
Majority391.08.9
Radical hold Swing +7.5
1837 general election: Greenwich [13] [7]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Matthias Wolverley Attwood 1,368 36.8 +10.2
Radical Edward George Barnard 1,194 32.1 +4.5
Radical Charles Napier 1,15831.1N/A
Turnout 2,43478.39.5
Registered electors 3,107
Majority1744.7N/A
Conservative gain from Whig Swing +2.9
Majority361.0±0.0
Radical hold Swing 2.9

Elections in the 1840s

1841 general election: Greenwich [13] [7]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig James Whitley Deans Dundas 1,747 37.9 New
Radical Edward George Barnard 1,592 34.5 +2.4
Conservative George Cockburn [15] 1,27427.69.2
Turnout 2,84874.73.6
Registered electors 3,811
Majority1553.4N/A
Whig gain from Conservative Swing N/A
Majority3186.9+5.9
Radical hold Swing +3.5

Dundas was appointed a Lord Commissioner of the Admiralty, requiring a by-election.

By-election, 13 July 1846: Greenwich [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig James Whitley Deans Dundas Unopposed
Whig hold
1847 general election: Greenwich [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig James Whitley Deans Dundas 2,409 46.7 +8.8
Radical Edward George Barnard 1,511 29.3 5.2
Radical David Salomons 1,23624.0N/A
Turnout 2,578 (est)49.7 (est)25.0
Registered electors 5,187
Majority1,17322.8+19.4
Whig hold Swing +7.0
Radical hold Swing 7.0

Elections in the 1850s

Barnard's death caused a by-election.

By-election, 28 June 1851: Greenwich [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Radical David Salomons 2,165 62.9 +38.9
Radical David Williams Wire [16] [11] 1,27837.1N/A
Majority88725.8N/A
Turnout 3,44357.2+7.5
Registered electors 6,022
Radical hold Swing N/A

Dundas resigned after being appointed Commander of the Mediterranean Fleet, causing a by-election.

By-election, 11 February 1852: Greenwich [13] [17]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig Houston Stewart 2,956 70.9 +24.2
Radical Montague Chambers 1,21129.124.2
Majority1,74541.9+19.1
Turnout 4,16766.1+16.4
Registered electors 6,308
Whig hold Swing +24.2
1852 general election: Greenwich [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Peter Rolt 2,415 30.6 New
Radical Montague Chambers 2,360 29.9 +0.6
Whig Houston Stewart 2,02625.641.1
Radical David Salomons 1,10213.910.1
Turnout 5,159 (est)81.8 (est)+32.1
Registered electors 6,308
Majority550.7N/A
Conservative gain from Whig Swing N/A
Majority3344.3N/A
Radical hold Swing +10.6

Rolt resigned, causing a by-election.

By-election, 9 February 1857: Greenwich [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig William Codrington 2,975 65.8 +30.2
Radical Arthur B. Sleigh [18] 1,54334.29.6
Majority1,43231.6N/A
Turnout 4,51857.324.5
Registered electors 7,888
Whig gain from Conservative Swing +19.9
1857 general election: Greenwich [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig William Codrington 2,985 38.1 +12.5
Radical John Townsend 2,784 35.5 +21.6
Radical Montague Chambers 2,06526.43.5
Majority7199.1N/A
Turnout 3,917 (est)49.7 (est)32.1
Registered electors 7,888
Whig gain from Conservative Swing +1.8
Radical hold Swing +4.6

Townsend resigned after becoming a bankrupt, also leading to his suspension from the House of Commons.

By-election, 16 February 1859: Greenwich [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Radical David Salomons 3,444 57.7 4.2
Whig William Angerstein [11] 2,52342.3+4.2
Majority92115.4N/A
Turnout 5,96775.1+25.4
Registered electors 7,942
Radical hold Swing 4.2
1859 general election: Greenwich [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal David Salomons 3,873 38.2 New
Liberal William Angerstein 3,520 34.7 New
Liberal Montague Chambers 1,71816.99.5
Conservative John Heron-Maxwell 1,03110.2New
Majority1,80217.8+8.6
Turnout 5,587 (est)70.3 (est)+20.6
Registered electors 7,942
Liberal hold Swing N/A
Liberal hold Swing N/A

Elections in the 1860s

1865 general election: Greenwich [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal David Salomons 4,499 41.6 +3.4
Liberal Charles Tilston Bright 3,691 34.1 N/A
Conservative John Heron-Maxwell 2,32821.5+16.4
Radical Liberal Baxter Langley 1901.8New
Conservative Douglas Harris [19] 1161.14.0
Majority1,36312.65.2
Turnout 6,518 (est)66.5 (est)3.8
Registered electors 9,805
Liberal hold Swing 1.4
Liberal hold Swing N/A
1868 general election: Greenwich [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal David Salomons 6,684 30.2 11.4
Liberal William Ewart Gladstone 6,386 28.8 5.3
Conservative Henry Parker [20] 4,70421.20.3
Conservative Arthur Stanhope 4,37219.7+18.6
Majority1,6827.65.0
Turnout 11,073 (est)71.0 (est)+4.5
Registered electors 15,588
Liberal hold Swing 15.0
Liberal hold Swing 2.5

Gladstone's appointment as Prime Minister and First Lord of the Treasury caused a by-election.

By-election, 21 December 1868: Greenwich [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal William Ewart Gladstone Unopposed
Liberal hold

Elections in the 1870s

Salomons' death caused a by-election.

By-election, 4 Aug 1873: Greenwich [13] [21]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Thomas Boord 4,525 54.2 +13.3
Radical Liberal Baxter Langley [22] 2,37928.5New
Liberal William Angerstein 1,06412.746.3
Radical LiberalJohn Bennett [23] [24] 3243.9New
Liberal-ConservativeRobert Coningsby [25] 270.3New
Ind. Conservative Henry Pook [26] 270.3New
Majority2,14625.7N/A
Turnout 8,34652.218.8
Registered electors 15,990
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +29.8
1874 general election: Greenwich [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Thomas Boord 6,193 27.0 +5.8
Liberal William Ewart Gladstone 5,968 26.0 2.8
Conservative John Evelyn Liardet [27] 5,56124.2+4.5
Liberal Baxter Langley 5,25522.97.3
Turnout 11,489 (est)65.3 (est)5.7
Registered electors 17,599
Majority2251.0N/A
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +6.6
Majority4071.85.8
Liberal hold Swing 3.7

Elections in the 1880s

1880 general election: Greenwich [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Thomas Boord 9,243 26.6 0.4
Conservative Henry de Worms 9,240 26.6 +2.4
Liberal James Ebenezer Saunders [28] 8,15223.42.6
Liberal William Henry Stone [29] 8,14123.4+0.5
Majority1,0883.1+2.1
Turnout 17,388 (est)78.5 (est)+13.2
Registered electors 22,161
Conservative hold Swing 0.5
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +2.5
1885 general election: Greenwich [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Thomas Boord 3,317 52.8 0.4
Liberal Herbert Watney2,96147.2+0.4
Majority3565.6+2.5
Turnout 6,27872.75.8 (est)
Registered electors 8,632
Conservative hold Swing 0.4
1886 general election: Greenwich [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Thomas Boord 3,240 55.9 +3.1
Liberal George Crispe Whiteley2,55144.1-3.1
Majority68911.8+6.2
Turnout 5,79167.1-5.6
Registered electors 8,632
Conservative hold Swing +3.1

Elections in the 1890s

1892 general election: Greenwich [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Thomas Boord 4,200 52.0 -3.9
Liberal George Crispe Whiteley3,87748.0+3.9
Majority3234.0-7.8
Turnout 8,07778.8+11.7
Registered electors 10,256
Conservative hold Swing -3.9
1895 general election: Greenwich [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Hugh Cecil 4,802 57.4 +5.4
Liberal George Crispe Whiteley3,56442.6-5.4
Majority1,23814.8+10.8
Turnout 8,36676.8-2.0
Registered electors 10,899
Conservative hold Swing +5.4

Elections in the 1900s

Jackson Richard Stephens Jackson.jpg
Jackson
1900 general election: Greenwich [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Hugh Cecil 5,454 61.0 +3.6
Liberal Richard Jackson 3,48439.03.6
Majority1,97022.0+7.2
Turnout 8,93873.03.8
Registered electors 12,247
Conservative hold Swing +3.6
1906 general election: Greenwich [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Richard Jackson 4,906 45.3 +6.3
Ind. Conservative Ion Hamilton Benn 3,56532.9New
Conservative Hugh Cecil 2,35621.839.2
Majority1,34112.4N/A
Turnout 10,82783.0+10.0
Registered electors 13,049
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +22.8

Elections in the 1910s

January 1910 general election: Greenwich [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Ion Hamilton Benn 6,284 55.3 +33.5
Liberal Richard Jackson 5,08344.7-0.6
Majority1,20110.6-1.8
Turnout 13,15386.4+3.4
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +17.0
December 1910 general election: Greenwich [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Ion Hamilton Benn 5,697 57.9 +2.6
Liberal John William Harris414642.1-2.5
Majority1,55115.8+5.2
Turnout 13,15374.8-11.6
Conservative hold Swing +2.6
General election 1918: Greenwich
PartyCandidateVotes%±
C Unionist Ion Hamilton Benn 14,57669.3+11.4
Labour James Bermingham6,47130.7New
Majority8,10538.6+22.8
Turnout 21,04748.126.7
Registered electors 43,756
Unionist hold Swing N/A
Cindicates candidate endorsed by the coalition government.

Elections in the 1920s

Hopwood Hume George Hopwood Hume.jpg
Hopwood Hume
General election 1922: Greenwich [31]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Unionist George Hume 16,934 60.9 8.4
Labour Edward Timothy Palmer 10,86039.1+8.4
Majority6,07421.816.8
Turnout 27,79460.4+12.3
Registered electors 46,005
Unionist hold Swing 8.4
General election 1923: Greenwich
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Edward Timothy Palmer 12,314 42.7 +3.6
Unionist George Hume 10,74637.223.7
Liberal Charles Garfield Lott Du Cann5,80620.1New
Majority1,5685.5N/A
Turnout 28,86661.8+1.4
Registered electors 46,741
Labour gain from Unionist Swing +13.7
General election 29 October 1924: Greenwich [32]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Unionist George Hume 18,473 51.5 +14.3
Labour Edward Timothy Palmer 17,40948.5+5.8
Majority1,0643.0N/A
Turnout 35,88275.2+13.4
Registered electors 47,716
Unionist gain from Labour Swing +4.3
General election 30 May 1929: Greenwich [33]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Edward Timothy Palmer 20,328 46.3 2.2
Unionist George Hume 16,71038.113.4
Liberal W P Campbell6,87015.6New
Majority3,6188.2N/A
Turnout 43,90870.44.8
Registered electors 62,342
Labour gain from Unionist Swing +5.6

Elections in the 1930s

General election 1931: Greenwich [34] [35]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative George Hume 29,278 65.0 +26.9
Labour Edward Timothy Palmer 13,72230.5-15.8
Communist Kath Duncan 2,0244.5New
Majority15,55634.6N/A
Turnout 45,02471.0+0.6
Registered electors 63,385
Conservative gain from Labour Swing +21.35
General election 1935: Greenwich [36]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative George Hume 22,52652.43-12.60
Labour Co-op Joseph Reeves 20,43647.57+17.09
Majority2,0903.51-31.04
Turnout 49,21367.79-3.24
Registered electors 72,599
Conservative hold Swing -14.85

Elections in the 1940s

General election 1945: Greenwich [37]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Joseph Reeves 22,07865.60+18.03
Conservative Augustus Agar 11,58034.40-18.03
Majority10,49831.20N/A
Turnout 33,65870.08+2.20
Registered electors 48,025
Labour gain from Conservative Swing +18.03

Elections in the 1950s

General election 1950: Greenwich [38] [39]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Joseph Reeves 29,37957.85-7.75
Conservative Ronald Gilbey 18,25535.95+1.55
Liberal Leslie Maurice Dale3,1486.20New
Majority11,12421.90-9.28
Turnout 50,78282.73+12.65
Registered electors 62,132
Labour hold Swing -4.65
General election 1951: Greenwich [40] [41]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Joseph Reeves 30,32660.38+2.53
Conservative William H Bishop19,89839.62+3.67
Majority10,42820.76-1.15
Turnout 50,22480.95-2.03
Registered electors 62,042
Labour hold Swing -0.57
General election 1955: Greenwich [42] [43]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Joseph Reeves 26,42358.84-1.54
Conservative William F Rhodes18,48441.16+1.54
Majority7,93917.68-3.08
Turnout 44,90773.24-7.71
Registered electors 61,314
Labour hold Swing -1.54
General election 1959: Greenwich [44] [45]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Richard Marsh 25,20456.15-2.69
Conservative J Rodney Holmes19,67943.85+2.69
Majority5,52512.30-5.38
Turnout 44,88374.11+0.87
Registered electors 60,561
Labour hold Swing -2.69

Elections in the 1960s

General election 1964: Greenwich [46] [47]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Richard Marsh 22,81456.18+0.03
Conservative John Gummer 12,59231.01-12.84
Liberal Michael PD Ellman5,20512.82N/A
Majority10,22225.17+13.14
Turnout 40,61171.57-2.54
Registered electors 56,742
Labour hold Swing +6.44
General election 1966: Greenwich [48] [49]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Richard Marsh 24,35964.86+8.68
Conservative John Gummer 13,20035.14+4.13
Majority11,15929.72+4.55
Turnout 37,55967.70-3.87
Registered electors 55,477
Labour hold Swing +6.41

Elections in the 1970s

General election 1970: Greenwich
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Richard Marsh 20,80455.75
Conservative J Stuart Thom13,19535.36
Liberal Pamela Wylan3,3198.89
Majority7,60920.39
Turnout 37,31865.66
Labour hold Swing
1971 Greenwich by-election
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Guy Barnett 14,67166.73+10.98
Conservative J Stuart Thom6,15027.97-7.39
Fellowship Ronald Stephen Mallone7923.60New
Ind. Conservative Reginald Simmerson2851.30New
Independent David Davies890.40New
Turnout 21,987
Majority8,52138.76+18.37
Labour hold Swing
General election February 1974: Greenwich [50] [51]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Guy Barnett 20.16451.29
Conservative Suzette Mary Tremlett Harold11,29428.73
Liberal Alastair James Drysdale Wilson7,85519.98
Majority8,87022.56
Turnout 39,31375.01
Labour hold Swing
General election October 1974: : Greenwich [50] [52]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Guy Barnett 19,15555.53+4.24
Conservative Suzette Mary Tremlett Harold9,24926.81-1.92
Liberal Alastair James Drysdale Wilson5,83816.92-3.06
Independent David Green2540.74
Majority9,90628.72
Turnout 34,49665.29
Labour hold Swing +3.08
General election 1979: Greenwich [50] [53]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Guy Barnett 18,975 52.1 -3.4
Conservative Narindar Singh Saroop12,13333.3+6.5
Liberal Graham Howard Knight3,87010.6-6.3
National Front Helena Mary Steven9512.6New
Fellowship Ronald Stephen Mallone4601.3New
Majority6,84218.8-9.9
Turnout 36,38970.6+5.0
Labour hold Swing -5.0

Elections in the 1980s

General election 1983: Greenwich [54]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Guy Barnett 13,361 38.2 −13.9
Conservative Arthur Rolfe12,15034.8+1.5
SDP T. Ford8,78325.1New
BNP Ian Dell2590.7New
Fellowship Ronald Mallone2420.7−0.6
Communist F. Hooks1490.4New
Majority1,2113.5−15.3
Turnout 35,19467.7−2.9
Labour hold Swing
By-election 1987: Greenwich
PartyCandidateVotes%±
SDP Rosie Barnes 18,287 53.0 +27.9
Labour Deirdre Wood11,67633.8−4.4
Conservative John Antcliffe3,85211.2−23.6
Green Graham Bell2640.8New
Rainbow Dream Ticket Malcolm Hardee 1240.3New
BNP Ian Dell1160.3−0.4
National Front Joe Pearce 1030.3New
Revolutionary Communist Kate Marshall910.3New
Majority6,61119.2+15.7
Turnout 34,51368.2-4.5
SDP gain from Labour Swing +16.2
General election 1987: Greenwich [55]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
SDP Rosie Barnes 15,149 40.6 +15.5
Labour Deirdre Wood13,00834.9−3.3
Conservative John Antcliffe8,69523.3−11.5
Green Jacqueline Thomas3460.9New
Fellowship Ronald Mallone590.2−0.5
Communist Patricia Clinton580.2−0.2
Majority2,1415.7+2.2
Turnout 37,31573.4+5.7
SDP gain from Labour Swing +9.4

Elections in the 1990s

General election 1992: Greenwich [56] [57]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Nick Raynsford 14,630 41.0 +6.2
Independent Social Democrat Rosie Barnes 13,27337.2New
Conservative Alison McNair6,96019.5−3.7
Green Robert H.J. McCracken4831.4+0.6
Fellowship Ronald Mallone1470.4N/A
Independent Malcolm Hardee 1030.3New
Natural Law John D. Small700.2New
Majority1,3573.8N/A
Turnout 35,66674.6+1.2
Labour gain from SDP Swing +4.8

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Blackpool South is a constituency in Lancashire, represented in the House of Commons since 2019 by Scott Benton, a Conservative.

Liverpool Garston (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1950-2010

Liverpool Garston was a borough constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It elected one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election.

Cambridge (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1885 onwards

Cambridge is a parliamentary constituency in Cambridgeshire, England represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament. The constituency was created in 1295 and is centred on the university city of Cambridge.

Nottingham North (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom

Nottingham North is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2017 by Alex Norris of the Labour and Co-operative party.

Stoke-on-Trent Central (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1950 onwards

Stoke-on-Trent Central is a constituency in Staffordshire. It has been represented by Jo Gideon, of the Conservative party since the general election of 2019.

Woking (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1950 onwards

Woking is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2010 by Jonathan Lord, a Conservative. Since it was first created for the 1950 general election, it has returned solely Conservative Party candidates.

Paisley was a parliamentary constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1832 until 1983, when it was divided into Paisley North and Paisley South. These two constituencies were in turn amalgamated into Paisley and Renfrewshire South and Paisley and Renfrewshire North in 2005.

Glasgow Govan was a parliamentary constituency in the Govan district of Glasgow. It was represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom for 120 years; from 1885 until 2005, returning one Member of Parliament (MP) elected by the first-past-the-post system.

Clackmannan and Eastern Stirlingshire was a parliamentary constituency in the Clackmannan area of Central Scotland. It returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, elected by the first past the post system.

WestAberdeenshire was a Scottish county constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1868 to 1918 and from 1950 to 1983. It elected one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election.

Angus North and Mearns was a county constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1950 to 1983. It elected one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post voting system.

Kidderminster (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1832-1983

Kidderminster was a parliamentary constituency in Worcestershire, represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It elected one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post voting system.

Whitehaven (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1832-1983

Whitehaven was a constituency centred on the town of Whitehaven in Cumberland, which returned one Member of Parliament to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

Ebbw Vale was a constituency in the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It was created for the 1918 general election and returned one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system until it was abolished for the 1983 general election.

Erith and Crayford was a parliamentary constituency in the London Borough of Bexley, south-east London, which returned one Member of Parliament to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

Liverpool Kirkdale (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1885-1983

Liverpool Kirkdale was a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom covering Kirkdale, Liverpool. It elected one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election.

West Ham North was a borough constituency in the County Borough of West Ham, in what was then Essex but is now Greater London. It returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, elected by the first-past-the-post voting system.

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Bibliography

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Buckinghamshire
Constituency represented by the Prime Minister
1868–1874
Succeeded by
Buckinghamshire