Lackawanna Heritage Valley National and State Heritage Area

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Lackawanna Heritage Valley National and State Heritage Area
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Location in Pennsylvania
LocationPennsylvania, United States
Coordinates 41°24′32″N75°40′36″W / 41.40889°N 75.67667°W / 41.40889; -75.67667 Coordinates: 41°24′32″N75°40′36″W / 41.40889°N 75.67667°W / 41.40889; -75.67667
Established1991
Governing bodyLackawanna Heritage Valley Authority
Website www.lhva.org

The Lackawanna Heritage Valley National and State Heritage Area is a state and federally designated National Heritage Area in northeastern Pennsylvania. It was initially established in 1991 as the first State Heritage Park in Pennsylvania, and was additionally designated a National Heritage Area in 2000. The designations recognize the area's heritage of industry, architecture, history and natural resources, and provide a framework for development and promotion of these features. [1] The Lackawanna Heritage Valley National and State Heritage Area is managed by the Lackawanna Heritage Valley Authority, or LHVA.

The National Heritage Area comprises the Lackawanna River watershed as it descends through Carbondale and Scranton to its junction with the Susquehanna River at Pittston. [2] The heritage area covers portions of Lackawanna, Susquehanna, Wayne and Luzerne counties. The area is strongly identified with anthracite coal mining and the industries which depended on the coal, such as railroading, locomotive-building and rail-making. [1]

Major components of the heritage area include Steamtown National Historic Site, the Pennsylvania Anthracite Heritage Museum and the Electric City Trolley Museum. [1]

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Nanticoke Creek

Nanticoke Creek is a tributary of the Susquehanna River in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is approximately 4.4 miles (7.1 km) long and flows through Hanover Township and Nanticoke. The watershed of the creek has an area of 7.57 square miles (19.6 km2). The creek has one named tributary, which is known as Espy Run. Nanticoke Creek impaired by pH and metals due to abandoned mine drainage. Abandoned mine drainage discharges in the creek's watershed include the Truesdale Mine Discharge and the Askam Borehole. The creek is located in the Northern Middle Anthracite Field and is in the Anthracite Valley Section of the ridge and valley physiographic province. The main rock formations in the watershed include the Mauch Chunk Formation, the Pottsville Group, and the Llewellyn Formation. The surficial geology consists of coal dumps, surface mining land, alluvium, Wisconsinan Outwash, Wisconsinan Till, urban land, and bedrock.

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Wildcat Creek is a tributary of the Lackawanna River in Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is approximately 3.8 miles (6.1 km) long and flows through Archbald and Blakely. The watershed of the creek has an area of 4.49 square miles (11.6 km2). It has one named tributary, which is known as West Branch Tinklepaugh Creek. The creek may lose flow to coal measures and may receive only intermittent flow even at its source. Only the upper reaches of the creek have a natural channel. It flows through an open box culvert in its lower reaches.

Fall Brook is a tributary of the Lackawanna River in Susquehanna County and Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is approximately 7.9 miles (12.7 km) long and flows through Clifford Township in Susquehanna County and Fell Township, Carbondale Township, and Carbondale in Lackawanna County. The watershed of the stream has an area of 12.4 square miles (32 km2), making it one of the largest tributaries of the Lackwanna River. It is not designated as impaired, but does experience flow loss. The stream begins on the Allegheny Plateau and passes through the Fall Brook Gap. It also flows over the Fall Brook Falls, which are 60 feet (18 m) high. Fall Brook is situated within the Coal Region.

Racket Brook is a tributary of the Lackawanna River in Wayne County and Lackawanna County, in Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is approximately 3.6 miles (5.8 km) long and flows through Canaan Township in Wayne County and Carbondale Township and Carbondale in Lackawanna County. The watershed of the stream has an area of 5.29 square miles (13.7 km2). The stream has no named tributaries, but has two unnamed tributaries. It is not designated as impaired, but it does experience minor flow loss. It drains part of the Moosic Mountains and also flows through a ravine known as the Brownell Ravine.

References

  1. 1 2 3 "About the Lackawanna Heritage Valley". Lackawanna Heritage Valley National and State Heritage Area. Archived from the original on 9 March 2012. Retrieved 18 April 2012.
  2. "Lackawanna Heritage Valley Map" (PDF). Lackawanna Heritage Valley National and State Heritage Area. Retrieved 18 April 2012.