Lega Pro Prima Divisione

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Lega Pro Prima Divisione
Founded1935 as Serie C
1978 as Serie C1
2008 as Lega Pro Prima Divisione
Folded2014
Country Italy
Other club(s) from San Marino
Confederation FIGC
Number of teams33 (17, 16 respectively for the group A, B)
Level on pyramid3
Promotion to Serie B
Relegation to Lega Pro Seconda Divisione
Domestic cup(s) Coppa Italia Lega Pro
Supercoppa di Lega di Prima Divisione
Last champions Virtus Entella (group A)
Perugia (group B)
(2013–14)
Most championships Catanzaro and Ravenna (3 each)
Website www.lega-pro.com

Lega Pro Prima Divisione was the third highest football league in Italy. It consisted of 33 teams, divided geographically into two divisions of 16 and 17 teams for group A and B respectively. Until 2008 it was known as Serie C1. [1]

Contents

Before the 1978–79 season there were only three leagues of professional football in Italy, the third being Serie C. In 1978, it was decided to split Serie C into Serie C1 and Serie C2. Serie C2, the fourth highest professional league in the Italian system, was also renamed in 2008 and was called Lega Pro Seconda Divisione. [ citation needed ] The reform, already decided by the FIGC led to the reunification with the second division starting from 2014-2015 and with the subsequent rebirth of the third division championship organized by the pro league with 60 teams divided into three groups of 20 in Lega Pro. [ citation needed ]

Promotion and relegation

In each division, two teams were promoted to Serie B, and three teams were relegated to Lega Pro Seconda Divisione. In total, the league promoted 4 teams to Serie B and relegated 6 teams to Seconda Divisione.

The team finishing first in the regular season was directly promoted to Serie B, while teams placing 2nd to 5th were entered into a play-off semi-final for the chance of gaining the second promotional spot for that particular division.

Past champions

Source for league winners: [2]

Serie C1

Lega Pro Prima Divisione

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References

  1. "La serie C cambia nome: sarà Lega Pro". Corriere della Sera (in Italian). 19 June 2008. Retrieved 17 September 2015.
  2. Igor Kramarsic (17 July 2012). "Italy - List of Third Division (Serie C) Champions". RSSSF. Retrieved 12 January 2013.