Czech Republic football league system

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The Czech Republic football league system is a series of interconnected leagues for club football in the Czech Republic.

Football in the Czech Republic association football practiced in the Czech Republic

This article discusses the structure of football leagues in the Czech Republic. These leagues are organised by The Football Association of the Czech Republic (FAČR). Football is the most popular sport in the Czech Republic.

Contents

The system

2013–14

Below shows how the current system works. For each division, its English name, official name or sponsorship name (which often differs radically from its official name) and number of clubs is given. Each division promotes to the division(s) that lie directly above them and relegates to the division(s) that lie directly below them.

Two clubs are relegated and promoted from the Czech First League and Czech 2. Liga respectively each season.

One club is promoted from both the ČFL and the MSFL to replace the two relegated teams from Czech 2. Liga.

Winners of Czech Divisions A, B and C are promoted to the ČFL and winners of Czech Divisions D and E are promoted to the MFSL. Depending on the regional locations of the teams relegated from Czech 2. Liga the number of teams promoted and relegated from the ČFL and MFSL can vary from season to season.

Below the five 4th Divisions, there are 14 regional divisions, the winners of which are promoted to the corresponding 4th division. Promotion from 5th to 4th level not necessarily follows the path in the table below (this is mainly the case of Central Bohemian region), teams are placed to particular divisions according to their location/FA decision. Clubs from Bohemia (regions below Divisions A/B/C) can't play with clubs from Moravia-Silesia (Divisions D/E) though.

Level
Clubs

League(s)/Division(s)

1
16

1st Division
16 clubs

2
16

Czech National Football League
16 clubs

3
34

Bohemian Football League
Česká fotbalová liga (ČFL)
18 clubs
Moravian–Silesian Football League
Moravskoslezská fotbalová liga (MSFL)
16 clubs

4
80

Division A
16 clubs
Division B
16 clubs
Division C
16 clubs
Division D
16 clubs
Division E
16 clubs

5
220

Regional Championship
Karlovy Vary
14 clubs
Regional Championship
Plzeň
16 clubs
Regional Championship
South Bohemia
16 clubs
Regional Championship
Prague
16 clubs
Regional Championship
Central Bohemia
16 clubs
Regional Championship
Ústí nad Labem
16 clubs
Regional Championship
Liberec
14 clubs
Regional Championship
Hradec Králové
16 clubs
Regional Championship
Pardubice
16 clubs
Regional Championship
South Moravia
16 clubs
Regional Championship
Vysočina
16 clubs
Regional Championship
Zlín
16 clubs
Regional Championship
Olomouc
16 clubs
Regional Championship
Moravia-Silesia
16 clubs

6
330

I.A Class
14 clubs
I.A Class
16 clubs
I.A Class
Group A
14 clubs
Group B
14 clubs
I.A Class
Group A
14 clubs
Group B
14 clubs
I.A Class
Group A
16 clubs
Group B
16 clubs
I.A Class
Group A
14 clubs
Group B
14 clubs
I.A Class
14 clubs
I.A Class
16 clubs
I.A Class
14 clubs
I.A Class
Group A
14 clubs
Group B
14 clubs
I.A Class
Group A
14 clubs
Group B
14 clubs
I.A Class
Group A
14 clubs
Group B
14 clubs
I.A Class
Group A
14 clubs
Group B
14 clubs
I.A Class
Group A
14 clubs
Group B
14 clubs

7
550

I.B Class
14 clubs
I.B Class
Group A
14 clubs
Group B
14 clubs
Group C
14 clubs
I.B Class
Group A
14 clubs
Group B
14 clubs
Group C
14 clubs
Group D
14 clubs
I.B Class
Group A
14 clubs
Group B
14 clubs
I.B Class
Group A
14 clubs
Group B
14 clubs
Group C
14 clubs
Group D
14 clubs
Group E
14 clubs
I.B Class
Group A
14 clubs
Group B
14 clubs
Group C
14 clubs
I.B Class
East
14 clubs
West
14 clubs
I.B Class
Group A+B
16 clubs
Group C+D
16 clubs
I.B Class
Group A
14 clubs
Group B
14 clubs
I.B Class
Group A
14 clubs
Group B
14 clubs
Group C
14 clubs
I.B Class
Group A
14 clubs
Group B
14 clubs
I.B Class
Group A
14 clubs
Group B
14 clubs
Group C
14 clubs
I.B Class
Group A
14 clubs
Group B
14 clubs
Group C
14 clubs
I.B Class
Group A
14 clubs
Group B
14 clubs
Group C
14 clubs
Group D
14 clubs

8
1090



9
1370



10
1034

Cheb
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
Karlovy Vary
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
IV. Class
1 group
Sokolov
II. Class
1 group

Domažlice
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
IV. Class
1 group
Klatovy
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
IV. Class
2 groups
Plzeň-city
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
Plzeň-south
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
IV. Class
1 group
Plzeň-north
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
IV. Class
2 groups
Rokycany
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
Tachov
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
IV. Class
3 groups

České Budějovice
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
2 groups
IV. Class
1 group
Český Krumlov
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
Jindřichův Hradec
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
2 groups
Písek
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
IV. Class
1 group
Prachatice
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
Strakonice
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
IV. Class
1 group
Tábor
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
IV. Class
2 groups

II. Class
4 groups
III. Class
3 groups

Benešov
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
2 groups
IV. Class
4 groups
Beroun
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
2 groups
IV. Class
2 groups
Kladno
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
2 groups
IV. Class
2 groups
Kolín
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
2 groups
IV. Class
3 groups
Kutná Hora
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
IV. Class
2 groups
Mělník
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
2 groups
IV. Class
2 groups
Mladá Boleslav
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
2 groups
IV. Class
1 group
Nymburk
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
2 groups
IV. Class
3 groups
Praha-east
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
2 groups
IV. Class
3 groups
Praha-west
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
2 groups
IV. Class
3 groups
Příbram
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
2 groups
IV. Class
3 groups
Rakovník
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
IV. Class
1 group

Chomutov
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
Děčín
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
Litoměřice
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
2 groups
IV. Class
2 groups
Louny
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
IV. Class
2 groups
Most
II. Class
1 group
Teplice
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
Ústí nad Labem
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group

Česká Lípa
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
Jablonec nad Nisou
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
Liberec
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
2 groups
Semily
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
2 groups

Hradec Králové
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
IV. Class
2 groups
Jičín
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
Náchod
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
Rychnov nad Kněžnou
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
IV. Class
1 group
Trutnov
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
IV. Class
1 group

Chrudim
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
IV. Class
1 group
Pardubice
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
2 groups
IV. Class
2 groups
Svitavy
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
IV. Class
1 group
Ústí nad Orlicí
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
IV. Class
1 group

Blansko
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
IV. Class
1 group
Břeclav
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
2 groups
IV. Class
3 groups
Brno-city
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
Brno-country
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
2 groups
IV. Class
3 groups
Hodonín
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
2 groups
IV. Class
2 groups
Vyškov
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
2 groups
IV. Class
2 groups
Znojmo
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
2 groups
IV. Class
4 groups

Havlíčkův Brod
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
IV. Class
2 groups
Jihlava
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
IV. Class
2 groups
Pelhřimov
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
IV. Class
1 group
Třebíč
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
2 groups
IV. Class
2 groups
Žďár nad Sázavou
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
IV. Class
2 groups

Kroměříž
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
3 groups
Uherské Hradiště
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
2 groups
IV. Class
2 groups
Vsetín
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
IV. Class
2 groups
Zlín
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
2 groups
IV. Class
3 groups

Jeseník
II. Class
1 group
Olomouc
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
IV. Class
2 groups
Přerov
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
2 groups
Prostějov
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
IV. Class
1 group
Šumperk
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
2 groups

Bruntál
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
2 groups
Frýdek-Místek
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group
Karviná
II. Class
2 groups
Nový Jičín
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
3 groups
Opava
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
2 groups
IV. Class
2 groups
Ostrava-city
II. Class
1 group
III. Class
1 group

See also

Regions of the Czech Republic

According to the Act no. 129/2000 Coll. on higher-level territorial self-governing units, which implements Chapter VII of the Czech Constitution, the Czech Republic is divided into thirteen regions (kraje) and one capital city with regional status as of 1 January 2000. The older administrative units seventy-six districts are still recognized and remain the seats of various branches of state administration, such as the judicial system.

Districts of the Czech Republic

In 1960, Czechoslovakia was re-divided into districts often without regard to traditional division and local relationships. In the area of the Czech Republic, there were 75 districts; a 76th Jeseník District was split in the 1990s from Šumperk District. Three consisted only of statutory cities Brno, Ostrava and Plzeň which gained the status of districts only in 1971; the capital city of Prague had a special status, but ten districts of Prague (obvody) were in some ways equivalent to okres.

Cup competitions

Clubs at the top four levels are eligible for cup competitions.

The Czech Cup, officially known as the MOL Cup for sponsorship reasons, is the major men's football cup competition in the Czech Republic. It is organised by the Czech Football Association.

Czech Supercup

The Czech Supercup was an annual football match between the winners of the Czech First League and the Czech Cup, organised by the Czech Football Association. It was last sponsored by Synot Tip and was therefore officially known as the Synot Tip Supercup. The Czech Supercup was discontinued in 2015 and replaced by the Czechoslovak Supercup from 2017 onward.

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