Football in the Comoros

Last updated
Football in Comoros
CountryComoros
Governing body Comoros Football Federation
National team(s) men's national team
Clubs Comoros Premier League
Club competitions
International competitions

Comoros joined the Confederation of African Football in 2003 following the formation of the Comoros Football Federation, the national football association, in 1979. Comoros were accepted as full members of FIFA in 2005. [1]

Following accession to FIFA's full member status, the Comoros national football team has competed for entry to the African Cup of Nations and World Cup since 2010; its qualifying campaigns for both competitions were unsuccessful.

At the highest level, the country's domestic competition consists of the Comoros Premier League and the Comoros Cup. Coin Nord is the country's most decorated club, having won the league title on six occasions. [2] [3]

League system

Level

League(s)/Division(s)

1

Ligue de Ngazidja
12 clubs

Ligue de Nzwani
10 clubs

Ligue de Mwali
8 clubs

2

Ligue de Ngazidja (Division 2)
24 clubs divided in 2 series of 12

Ligue de Nzwani (Division 2)
20 clubs divided in 2 series of 10


3

Ligue de Ngazidja (Division 3)
4 series



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References

  1. "BBC SPORT | Football | African | Fifa embraces the Comoros". BBC News. 2005-09-12. Retrieved 2013-12-03.
  2. Vickers, Steve (2009-10-24). "BBC SPORT | Football | African | Comoros make steps forward". BBC News. Retrieved 2013-12-03.
  3. "Comoros - List of Champions". Rsssf.com. 2013-11-28. Retrieved 2013-12-03.