The Ethics of Liberty

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The Ethics of Liberty
TheEthicsofLiberty.jpg
Paperback cover
Author Murray N. Rothbard
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Subject Liberty
Published
Media typePrint (Hardcover & Paperback) & e-book, audio-CD
Pages336 (Online e–book edition)
ISBN 0-391-02371-3 (Paperback edition)
OCLC 7813705
323.44/01 19
LC Class JC585 .R69 1982

The Ethics of Liberty is a 1982 book by American philosopher and economist Murray N. Rothbard, in which the author expounds a libertarian political position.

Contents

Summary

Rothbard provides an exposition of the libertarian political position. He argues for the case of freedom as a concept of natural rights and applies it to a variety of practical problems.

Reception

Reception of the book has been positive in libertarian circles. Many praise the book for its incisive analysis of natural law and its practical applications. Libertarian commentator Sheldon Richman says : "The Ethics of Liberty is a great book that deserves the attention of anyone interested in the good society and human flourishing." [1]

The economist Hans-Hermann Hoppe described The Ethics of Liberty as Murray Rothbard's second magnum opus, the other being Man, Economy, and State (1962). [2]

The philosopher Matt Zwolinski criticized the book, writing that Rothbard's discussion of self-ownership in chapter six "rests on a fundamental confusion between descriptive and normative claims." [3]

Release history

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References

  1. "TGIF: Rothbard's The Ethics of Liberty: Still Worthy after All These Years - The Future of Freedom Foundation". fff.org. Retrieved 2018-12-02.
  2. kanopiadmin (2014-08-18). "The Ethics of Liberty | Murray N. Rothbard". Mises Institute. Retrieved 2018-12-02.
  3. Zwolinski, Matt. "rothbards-second-argument-for-self-ownership" . Retrieved 26 August 2013.