The Goodbye Girl

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The Goodbye Girl
Goodbye Girl movie poster.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Herbert Ross
Produced by Ray Stark
Written by Neil Simon
Starring Richard Dreyfuss
Marsha Mason
Quinn Cummings
Music by Dave Grusin
Cinematography David M. Walsh
Edited byJohn F. Burnett
Production
company
Distributed by Warner Bros.
Release date
  • November 30, 1977 (1977-11-30)
Running time
110 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Box office$102 million [1]

The Goodbye Girl is a 1977 American romantic comedy-drama film produced by Ray Stark, directed by Herbert Ross and starring Richard Dreyfuss, Marsha Mason, Quinn Cummings and Paul Benedict. The original screenplay by Neil Simon centers on an odd trio: a struggling actor who has sublet a Manhattan apartment from a friend, the current occupant (his friend's ex-girlfriend, who has just been abandoned), and her precocious young daughter.

Romance film film genre

Romance films or romance movies are romantic love stories recorded in visual media for broadcast in theaters and on TV that focus on passion, emotion, and the affectionate romantic involvement of the main characters and the journey that their genuinely strong, true and pure romantic love takes them through dating, courtship or marriage. Romance films make the romantic love story or the search for strong and pure love and romance the main plot focus. Occasionally, romance lovers face obstacles such as finances, physical illness, various forms of discrimination, psychological restraints or family that threaten to break their union of love. As in all quite strong, deep, and close romantic relationships, tensions of day-to-day life, temptations, and differences in compatibility enter into the plots of romantic films.

Comedy-drama genre of theatre, film, and television

Comedy-drama or dramedy, is a genre in film and in television works in which plot elements are a combination of comedy and drama. It is a subgenre of contemporary tragicomedy. Comedy-drama is especially found in television programs and is considered a "hybrid genre".

Ray Stark was one of the most successful and prolific independent film producers in postwar Hollywood. Highly tenacious and intelligent, Stark's background as a literary and theatrical agent groomed him to produce some of the most dynamic and profitable films of the 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, such as The World of Suzie Wong (1960), West Side Story (1961), The Misfits (1961), Lolita (1962), The Night of The Iguana (1964), Reflections in a Golden Eye (1967), Funny Girl (1968), The Goodbye Girl (1977), The Toy (1982), Annie (1982), and Steel Magnolias (1989).

Contents

Richard Dreyfuss won the 1977 Academy Award for Best Actor for his performance as Elliot Garfield. At the time he became the youngest man to win an Oscar for Best Actor.

50th Academy Awards

The 50th Academy Awards were held at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles, California on April 3, 1978. The ceremonies were presided over by Bob Hope, who hosted the awards for the nineteenth and last time.

Academy Award for Best Actor award presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences

The Academy Award for Best Actor is an award presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS). It is given in honor of an actor who has delivered an outstanding performance in a leading role while working within the film industry. The award was traditionally presented by the previous year's Best Actress winner.

The film became the first romantic comedy to earn 100 million dollars in box office grosses.

Plot

Dancer Paula McFadden (Marsha Mason) and her ten-year-old daughter Lucy (Quinn Cummings) live in a Manhattan apartment with her married boyfriend, Tony DeForrest, until one day, he deserts her to go and act in a film in Italy. Before he left and unbeknownst to Paula, Tony subleased the apartment to Elliot Garfield (Richard Dreyfuss), a neurotic but sweet aspiring actor from Chicago, who shows up in the middle of the night expecting to move in. Though Paula is demanding and also neurotic, and makes clear from the start that she doesn't like Elliot, he allows her and Lucy to stay.

Marsha Mason American actress

Marsha Mason is an American actress and director. She was nominated four times for the Academy Award for Best Actress; for her performances in Cinderella Liberty (1973), The Goodbye Girl (1977), Chapter Two (1979), and Only When I Laugh (1981). The first two films also won her Golden Globe Awards. She was married for ten years (1973–83) to the playwright and screenwriter Neil Simon, who was the writer of three of her four Oscar-nominated roles.

Quinn Cummings writer, inventor and former child actress

Quinn Louise Cummings is an American retired child actress, now writer and entrepreneur. She is possibly best known for her role of Lucy McFadden in Neil Simon's The Goodbye Girl, and for her recurring role as Annie Cooper on the television series Family.

Manhattan Borough in New York City and county in New York, United States

Manhattan, often referred to locally as the City, is the most densely populated of the five boroughs of New York City and its economic and administrative center, cultural identifier, and historical birthplace. The borough is coextensive with New York County, one of the original counties of the U.S. state of New York. The borough consists mostly of Manhattan Island, bounded by the Hudson, East, and Harlem rivers; several small adjacent islands; and Marble Hill, a small neighborhood now on the U.S. mainland, physically connected to the Bronx and separated from the rest of Manhattan by the Harlem River. Manhattan Island is divided into three informally bounded components, each aligned with the borough's long axis: Lower, Midtown, and Upper Manhattan.

Paula struggles to get back into shape to resume her career as a dancer. Meanwhile, Elliot has landed the title role in an off-off-Broadway production of Richard III , but the director, Mark (Paul Benedict), wants him to play the character as an exaggerated stereotype of a homosexual, in Mark's words, "the queen who wanted to be king." Reluctantly, Elliot agrees to play the role, despite full knowledge that it may mean the end of his career as an actor. Many theater critics from television stations and newspapers in New York City attend the opening night, and they all savage the production, especially Elliot's performance. The play quickly closes, much to his relief.

<i>Richard III</i> (play) Shakespearean history play

Richard III is a historical play by William Shakespeare believed to have been written around 1593. It depicts the Machiavellian rise to power and subsequent short reign of King Richard III of England. The play is grouped among the histories in the First Folio and is most often classified as such. Occasionally, however, as in the quarto edition, it is termed a tragedy. Richard III concludes Shakespeare's first tetralogy.

Paul Benedict American actor

Paul Benedict was an American actor who made numerous appearances in television and movies beginning in 1965. He was known for his roles as The Number Painter on the PBS children's show Sesame Street and as the English neighbor Harry Bentley on the CBS sitcom The Jeffersons.

New York City Largest city in the United States

The City of New York, usually called either New York City (NYC) or simply New York (NY), is the most populous city in the United States. With an estimated 2018 population of 8,398,748 distributed over a land area of about 302.6 square miles (784 km2), New York is also the most densely populated major city in the United States. Located at the southern tip of the state of New York, the city is the center of the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass and one of the world's most populous megacities, with an estimated 19,979,477 people in its 2018 Metropolitan Statistical Area and 22,679,948 residents in its Combined Statistical Area. A global power city, New York City has been described as the cultural, financial, and media capital of the world, and exerts a significant impact upon commerce, entertainment, research, technology, education, politics, tourism, art, fashion, and sports. The city's fast pace has inspired the term New York minute. Home to the headquarters of the United Nations, New York is an important center for international diplomacy.

Despite their frequent clashes and Paula's lack of gratitude for Elliot's help, the two fall in love and sleep together. However, Lucy, although she likes Elliot, sees the affair as a repeat of what happened with Tony. Elliot convinces Paula that he will not be like that and later picks up Lucy from school and takes her on a carriage ride, during which Lucy admits that she likes Elliot, and he admits that he likes her and Paula and will not do anything to hurt them.

Carriage Generally horse-drawn means of transport

A carriage is a wheeled vehicle for people, usually horse-drawn; litters (palanquins) and sedan chairs are excluded, since they are wheelless vehicles. The carriage is especially designed for private passenger use, though some are also used to transport goods. A public passenger vehicle would not usually be called a carriage – terms for such include stagecoach, charabanc and omnibus. It may be light, smart and fast or heavy, large and comfortable or luxurious. Carriages normally have suspension using leaf springs, elliptical springs or leather strapping. Working vehicles such as the (four-wheeled) wagon and (two-wheeled) cart share important parts of the history of the carriage, as does too the fast (two-wheeled) chariot.

Elliot gets a job at an improvisational theatre, and is soon seen by a film producer. He is offered an opportunity for a role in a film that he cannot turn down, the only catch being that the job is in Seattle and Elliot will be gone for four weeks. Paula is informed of this and is scared that Elliot is leaving her, never to return, like all the other men in her life. Later, Elliot calls Paula from the phone booth across the street from the apartment, telling her that the flight was delayed, and at the last minute, Elliot invites Paula to go with him while he is filming the picture and suggests Lucy stay with a friend until they return. Paula declines but is happy because she knows that Elliot's invitation is evidence that he loves her and will come back. Before hanging up, Elliot asks Paula to have his prized guitar restrung, which he had deliberately left at the apartment, and she realizes this as further proof that he will indeed return and that he really does love her.

Improvisational theatre theatrical genre

Improvisational theatre, often called improvisation or improv, is the form of theatre, often comedy, in which most or all of what is performed is unplanned or unscripted: created spontaneously by the performers. In its purest form, the dialogue, action, story, and characters are created collaboratively by the players as the improvisation unfolds in present time, without use of an already prepared, written script.

A film producer is a person who oversees film production. Either employed by a production company or working independently, producers plan and coordinate various aspects of film production, such as selecting the script; coordinating writing, directing, and editing; and arranging financing.

Seattle City in Washington, United States

Seattle is a seaport city on the West Coast of the United States. It is the seat of King County, Washington. With an estimated 744,955 residents as of 2018, Seattle is the largest city in both the state of Washington and the Pacific Northwest region of North America. According to U.S. Census data released in 2018, the Seattle metropolitan area's population stands at 3.94 million, and ranks as the 15th largest in the United States. In July 2013, it was the fastest-growing major city in the United States and remained in the top 5 in May 2015 with an annual growth rate of 2.1%. In July 2016, Seattle was again the fastest-growing major U.S. city, with a 3.1% annual growth rate. Seattle is the northernmost large city in the United States.

Cast

Production

The film began as a screenplay called Bogart Slept Here (essentially the story of what happened to Dustin Hoffman after he became a star), that was to star Robert De Niro and Mason for Warner Bros. [2] It would have been the film De Niro would have made immediately after Taxi Driver . Mike Nichols was hired to direct. [3]

Simon recalled the original idea for the film:

The basic idea of the story was that Marsha, an ex-dancer, was married to a very promising but struggling off-Broadway actor who gets discovered in a small play and is whisked out to Hollywood, where he reluctantly moves with his family. He feels very out of place there...and they have trouble adjusting, especially after his first film makes him an international star...and it creates chaos in their marriage. The story was coming out a little darker than I had imagined, but I envisioned the character of the wife as a very good role for Marsha. [3]

Filming began on Bogart Slept Here when it became apparent that De Niro wasn't right for the role. Simon recalled: "...it was clear that any of the humor I had written was going to get lost. It's not that De Niro is not funny, but his humor comes mostly from his nuances, a bemused expression on his face or the way he would look at a character, smile and then look up at the ceiling." Nichols insisted on recasting De Niro. Soon after, Nichols left the project. [3]

Dreyfuss was brought in to try out with Mason. At the end of the reading, Neil Simon decided that the chemistry was there, but the script needed work. He rewrote the screenplay in six weeks.

[The screenplay] had to be funnier, more romantic, the way Marsha and I first imagined the picture would be. What I wanted to do was a prequel. In other words, instead of an off-Broadway actor, married with a child, why don't I start from the beginning? I'd start when they first meet. Not liking each other at first and then falling in love. [3]

The film's exteriors were shot in New York City and the interiors were shot on sets in Los Angeles. Warner Bros. was less enthused about Simon's script, and considered selling the project to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, while others at the studio preferred to partner MGM on the film, so this option was chosen. [3] With the 1996 acquisition of Turner Entertainment Company, which owned the pre- May 1986 MGM film library by Time Warner, Warner Bros. now controls the rights and distribution of the movie.

Soundtrack

The title song, "Goodbye Girl," was written and performed by David Gates in 1977, and was a Top 20 hit on the Billboard Hot 100 chart that same year, peaking at #15.

Reception

Roger Ebert gave the film a mostly favorable review, awarding three stars out of four. He was unimpressed with Mason's performance and the character as written, calling it "hardly ever sympathetic." [4] However, he praised Dreyfuss and cited his Richard III scenes as "the funniest in a movie since Mel Brooks staged Springtime for Hitler ." [4] Ebert criticized the beginning as "awkward at times and never quite involving," but "enjoyed its conclusion so much that we almost forgot our earlier reservations." [4] Gene Siskel awarded an identical three-star grade and said, "Make no mistake about it, the very best thing about 'The Goodbye Girl' is the character of Elliot Garfield as played by Dreyfuss, a character that comes very close to Dreyfuss' own self-and-profession centered lifestyle. But like Dreyfuss himself, Elliott Garfield, who initially comes off as [a] pushy, prickly type, ultimately wins you over." [5] Vincent Canby of The New York Times found the film to be "exhausting without being much fun" [6] and "relentlessly wisecracked." [6] Charles Champlin of The Los Angeles Times lauded it as "the best and most blissfully satisfying romantic comedy of the year and then some." [7] Arthur D. Murphy of Variety called the film "another feather in Herbert Ross' directorial cap," with Dreyfuss giving "his best screen performance to date." [8] Gary Arnold of The Washington Post wrote that the film "evolves into the most satisfying comedy Simon has written directly for the movies. One tolerates the plot mechanics for the sake of the genuinely amusing aspects of his script, the bright remarks and the distinctive or appealing character traits that provide good performers with live ammunition." [9] Pauline Kael of The New Yorker was negative, commenting, "It' not Neil Simon's one-liners that get you down in 'The Goodbye Girl,' it's his two-liners. The snappiness of the exchanges is so forced it's almost macabre." [10] David Ansen of Newsweek said, "It's pure formula, and Simon plays it straight, all cards on the table, with the conservative professionalism of a gambler used to winning. As directed by the ubiquitous Herbert Ross, The Goodbye Girl is a modest, bittersweet comedy that will delight Simon fans and leave his critics staunchly unconverted." [11]

The film holds a score of 88% on Rotten Tomatoes based on 16 reviews. [12]

Awards

50th Academy Awards

-Wins

-Nominations

Thirty-year-old Dreyfuss was, at that time, the youngest ever to win the Best Actor Oscar. This record stood for 25 years until it was broken by Adrien Brody, who was one month shy of 30 when he won for The Pianist .

Golden Globes

-Wins

-Nominations

British Academy of Film and Television Arts Awards

-Wins

-Nominations

American Film Institute

Musical and remake

There were three failed attempts to turn The Goodbye Girl into a half-hour, television sitcom, according to Lee Goldberg's book "Unsold Television Pilots." The first pilot aired on NBC in May 1982 and was entitled Goodbye Doesn't Mean Forever, [17] starred Karen Valentine and Michael Lembeck, and was directed by James Burrows from a script by Allan Katz. The second, unaired pilot was produced a year later starring Jobeth Williams and was directed by Charlotte Brown from a script by Brown and Pat Nardo. The third pilot, which also never aired, once again starred Valentine and was directed by Jay Sandrich.

The Goodbye Girl was subsequently developed into a 1993 Broadway musical of the same name starring Martin Short and Bernadette Peters.

A 2004 TNT remake [18] with Jeff Daniels and Patricia Heaton keeps the screenplay from the original version. [19]

Blu-ray release

On October 25, 2016 it was announced on the Home Theater Forum: [20] that The Goodbye Girl will be released by WAC (Warner Archive Collection) on High Definition Blu-ray on November 8, 2016.

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References

  1. Box Office Information for The Goodbye Girl. Worldwide Box Office. September 13, 2013.
  2. Sarah Heiman. "Spotlight - The Goodbye Girl". tcm.com. Retrieved March 16, 2008.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 Articles on The Goodbye Girl at TCM.com
  4. 1 2 3 Roger Ebert (January 1, 1977). "The Goodbye Girl". rogerebert.com. Retrieved March 16, 2008.
  5. Siskel, Gene (December 21, 1977). "Dreyfuss saves the day in Simon-ized 'Goodbye'". Chicago Tribune . Section 5, p. 3.
  6. 1 2 Vincent Canby (December 1, 1977). "'Goodbye Girl' Full of Wisecracks". The New York Times (movies.nytimes.com). Retrieved March 16, 2008.
  7. Champlin, Charles (December 4, 1977). "'Goodbye Girl': Welcoming a Romantic Comedy". Los Angeles Times . Calendar, p. 1.
  8. Murphy, Arthur D. (November 16, 1977). "Film Reviews: The Goodbye Girl". Variety . 20.
  9. Arnold, Gary (December 21, 1977). "A Fine Romance". The Washington Post . D6.
  10. Kael, Pauline (January 16, 1978). "The Current Cinema". The New Yorker . 83.
  11. Ansen, David (December 5, 1977). "Another Odd Couple". Newsweek . 109.
  12. "The Goodbye Girl". Rotten Tomatoes . Retrieved April 26, 2019.
  13. "AFI's 100 Years...100 Movies Nominees" (PDF). Retrieved May 1, 2017.
  14. "AFI's 100 Years...100 Laughs Nominees" (PDF). Retrieved May 1, 2017.
  15. "AFI's 100 Years...100 Songs Nominees" (PDF). Retrieved May 1, 2017.
  16. Institute, American Film. "AFI.com Error" (PDF). Retrieved May 1, 2017.
  17. IMDb. "Goodbye Doesn't Mean Forever (1982)".
  18. IMDb. "The Goodbye Girl (2004)".
  19. IMDb Trivia. "The Goodbye Girl (2004)".
  20. "The Goodbye Girl (1977) (Blu-ray) Available for Preorder" . Retrieved May 1, 2017.