Thomas W. Jones House

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Thomas W. Jones House
StonehamMA ThomasWJonesHouse.jpg
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Location 34 Warren St., Stoneham, Massachusetts
Coordinates 42°28′31″N71°6′9″W / 42.47528°N 71.10250°W / 42.47528; -71.10250 Coordinates: 42°28′31″N71°6′9″W / 42.47528°N 71.10250°W / 42.47528; -71.10250
Built 1878
Architect Spencer, John
Architectural style Second Empire
MPS Stoneham MRA
NRHP reference #

84002716

[1]
Added to NRHP April 13, 1984

The Thomas W. Jones House is a historic house at 34 Warren Street in Stoneham, Massachusetts. It is Stoneham's best preserved Second Empire house, preserving significant external details, and its carriage house. The two-story wood-frame house has a T shape, and features a bracketed porch and cornice, gable screens, paneled pilasters, and oriel windows. The house was built for Thomas W. Jones, who built the last major shoe factory in Stoneham. [2]

Stoneham, Massachusetts Town in Massachusetts, United States

Stoneham is a town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, nine miles north of downtown Boston. Its population was 21,437 at the 2010 census, and its proximity to major highways and public transportation offer convenient access to Boston and the North Shore coastal region and beaches of Massachusetts. The town is the birthplace of Olympic figure-skating medalist Nancy Kerrigan and is the home of the Stone Zoo.

The house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

See also

National Register of Historic Places listings in Stoneham, Massachusetts Wikimedia list article

This is a list of properties and historic districts in Stoneham, Massachusetts, that are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

National Register of Historic Places listings in Middlesex County, Massachusetts Wikimedia list article

This is a listing of places in Middlesex County in the U.S. state of Massachusetts that are listed in the National Register of Historic Places. With more than 1,300 listings, the county has more listings than any other county in the United States.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2008-04-15). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. "NRHP nomination for Thomas W. Jones House". Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Retrieved 2014-01-27.