Thomasomys

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Thomasomys
Temporal range: Recent
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Thomasomys monochromos skull Bangs.png
Thomasomys monochromos skull.
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Rodentia
Family: Cricetidae
Subfamily: Sigmodontinae
Tribe: Thomasomyini
Genus: Thomasomys
Coues, 1884
Type species
Hesperomys cinereus
Thomas, 1882
Species

Thomasomys andersoni
Thomasomys antoniobracki
Thomasomys apeco
Thomasomys aureus
Thomasomys baeops
Thomasomys bombycinus
Thomasomys burneoi
Thomasomys caudivarius
Thomasomys cinereiventer
Thomasomys cinereus
Thomasomys cinnameus
Thomasomys daphne
Thomasomys eleusis
Thomasomys erro
Thomasomys gracilis
Thomasomys hudsoni
Thomasomys hylophilus
Thomasomys incanus
Thomasomys ischyrus
Thomasomys kalinowskii
Thomasomys ladewi
Thomasomys laniger
Thomasomys macrotis
Thomasomys monochromos
Thomasomys niveipes
Thomasomys notatus
Thomasomys onkiro
Thomasomys oreas
Thomasomys paramorum
Thomasomys pardignasi
Thomasomys popayanus
Thomasomys praetor
Thomasomys pyrrhonotus
Thomasomys rhoadsi
Thomasomys rosalinda
Thomasomys silvestris
Thomasomys taczanowskii
Thomasomys ucucha
Thomasomys vestitus
Thomasomys vulcani

Thomasomys is a genus of rodent in the family Cricetidae, [1] named after British zoologist Oldfield Thomas. Nuclear DNA sequence analysis has indicated that it is a sister taxon to Rhagomys . [2] It contains the following species:

See also

Related Research Articles

Sigmodontinae Subfamily of rodents

The rodent subfamily Sigmodontinae includes New World rats and mice, with at least 376 species. Many authorities include the Neotominae and Tylomyinae as part of a larger definition of Sigmodontinae. When those genera are included, the species count numbers at least 508. Their distribution includes much of the New World, but the genera are predominantly South American, such as brucies. They invaded South America from Central America as part of the Great American Interchange near the end of the Miocene, about 5 million years ago. Sigmodontines proceeded to diversify explosively in the formerly isolated continent. They inhabit many of the same ecological niches that the Murinae occupy in the Old World.

The Colombian forest mouse is a species of rodent in the family Cricetidae. Some authorities consider it to be the only species in the genus Chilomys, while others accept Chilomys fumeus as being a valid species, and it may form part of a species complex. It is found in Colombia, Ecuador, and Venezuela.

The golden Oldfield mouse or golden thomasomys is a species of rodent in the family Cricetidae. It is found in Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela. Both the common and genus name commemorate the British zoologist Oldfield Thomas who worked at the Natural History Museum, London and studied South American rodents.

The ash-colored Oldfield mouse is a species of rodent in the family Cricetidae. It is found in Ecuador and Peru.

Daphne's Oldfield mouse is a species of rodent in the family Cricetidae. It is found in Bolivia and Peru.

Ladew's Oldfield mouse is a species of rodent in the family Cricetidae. It is found only in Bolivia.

Thomas's Oldfield mouse is a species of rodent in the family Cricetidae.

Rhoads's Oldfield mouse is a species of rodent in the family Cricetidae. It is found only in Ecuador.

Rosalinda's Oldfield mouse is a species of rodent in the family Cricetidae. It is found only in Peru.

Taczanowski's Oldfield mouse is a species of rodent in the family Cricetidae. It is found only in Peru.

The Apeco Oldfield mouse is a species of rodent in the family Cricetidae. It is known only from a single locality in north central Peru, which includes Rio Abiseo National Park, where it was found in cloud forest at an elevation of 3300 m. The species name comes from the acronym for the Asociacion Peruana para la Conservacion de la Naturaleza. It is among the largest members of the genus.

The white-tipped Oldfield mouse is a species of rodent in the family Cricetidae. It is found in the Andes from central Ecuador to northern Peru, at elevations from 2500 to 3350 m, where it lives in montane forest.

The cinnamon-colored Oldfield mouse, also called the "cinnamon-colored Thomasomys", is a species of rodent in the family Cricetidae. It is present in the Cordillera Oriental of the Andes from north central Ecuador to southern Colombia, at elevations from 2,400 to 3,800 m. It has terrestrial habits, and has been found in cloud forest and mossy areas. It was formerly considered a subspecies of T. gracilis.

Hudson's Oldfield mouse is a species of rodent in the family Cricetidae. It is known only from the Andes in southern Ecuador, where it has been found at an elevation of 3100 m. It was formerly considered a subspecies of T. gracilis. It is named after American zoologist Wilfred Hudson Osgood.

The large-eared Oldfield mouse is a species of rodent in the family Cricetidae. It is known only from a single locality in the Andes in north central Peru, in montane forest at an elevation of 3300 m. It has terrestrial habits and is sympatric with T. apeco.

The Ashaninka Oldfield mouse is a species of rodent in the family Cricetidae. It is known only from a single locality in the Cordillera Oriental of the southern Peruvian Andes, in montane forest at an elevation of 3350 m. It has terrestrial habits. The common name refers to the Asháninka, the largest indigenous group of the Peruvian Amazon.

The Popayán Oldfield mouse, also called the "Popayán thomasomys", is a species of rodent in the family Cricetidae. It is present in the Andes of southwestern and central western Colombia, at elevations from 1800 to 3200 m. It has been found in páramo, montane forest, and secondary forest. It was formerly considered a subspecies of T. aureus. T. nicefori, presently considered a synonym, will likely be raised to the status of a separate species. The specific name comes from the Colombian city of Popayán.

<i>Thomasomys ucucha</i> Species of rodent from Ecuador

Thomasomys ucucha, also known as the ucucha thomasomys, is a rodent in the genus Thomasomys of the family Cricetidae. It is known only from high altitude forest and grassland habitats in the Cordillera Oriental of Ecuador. Seven other species of Thomasomys live in the same areas. First collected in 1903, T. ucucha was formally described as a new species in 2003 and most closely resembles T. hylophilus, which occurs further to the north. The species is listed as "vulnerable" in the IUCN Red List as a result of habitat destruction.

The Pichincha Oldfield mouse is a species of rodent in the family Cricetidae. It is present in the Cordillera Occidental of the Andes of Ecuador, where its habitats include shrubby páramo and montane forest. It is nocturnal and terrestrial. The specific and common names are references to the volcano Pichincha, which dominates the city of Quito and on whose slopes the species was discovered at an elevation of 3500 m. The mouse is threatened by conversion of its limited habitat to agricultural use. It has sometimes been considered to be conspecific with Aepeomys lugens.

Rhagomys is a genus of South American rodents in the tribe Thomasomyini of the family Cricetidae. Two species separated by about 3100 km are known, from southeast Peru and Bolivia east of the Andes, and in the Atlantic Forest of southeast Brazil. An undetermined species of Rhagomys has also been reported from Mato Grosso in central Brazil. The species are as follows:

References

  1. Musser, G.G.; Carleton, M.D. (2005). "Superfamily Muroidea". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 894–1531. ISBN   978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC   62265494.
  2. D'Elía, G.; Luna, L.; González, E. M.; Patterson, B. D. (February 2006). "On the Sigmodontinae radiation (Rodentia, Cricetidae): An appraisal of the phylogenetic position of Rhagomys". Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution . Elsevier. 38 (2): 558–564. doi:10.1016/j.ympev.2005.08.011. PMID   16213166.