Thorpe Cloud railway station

Last updated

Thorpe Cloud
Location
Area Derbyshire Dales
Coordinates 53°02′59″N1°45′15″W / 53.0497°N 1.7542°W / 53.0497; -1.7542 Coordinates: 53°02′59″N1°45′15″W / 53.0497°N 1.7542°W / 53.0497; -1.7542
Operations
Original company London and North Western Railway
Pre-groupingLondon and North Western Railway
Post-grouping
Platforms2
History
4 August 1899Station opened
1 November 1954Closed to regular passenger services
7 October 1963Final closure
Disused railway stations in the United Kingdom
Closed railway stations in Britain
A B C D–F G H–J K–L M–O P–R S T–V W–Z

Thorpe Cloud railway station was opened in 1899 between the villages of Thorpe and Fenny Bentley in Derbyshire, south east of Buxton.

Contents

History

The station opened on 4 August 1899 when the London and North Western Railway (LNWR) opened the Parsley Hay to Ashbourne section of the Ashbourne Line, a branch from the Cromford and High Peak Railway (which ran from Whaley Bridge to Cromford) at Parsley Hay. [1] [2]

In common with the other stations on this line, the platforms and buildings were of timber construction. From Parsley Hay to Ashbourne the line was single with passing loops at the stations, though provision was made for doubling which never occurred. Like the previous station at Tissington it was built on a gradient of 1 in 60, downwards towards Ashbourne, and the modular buildings were stepped to accommodate this. [3] [ page needed ] The station took its name from a nearby hill, Thorpe Cloud which is at the entrance to Dovedale, and was therefore a popular venue for ramblers. The station was host to a LMS caravan from 1934 to 1939, a camping coach was also positioned here by the London Midland Region from 1954 to 1955. [4]

Regular passenger services ended on 1 November 1954, though excursions continued until 1963. [1] Freight continued until 7 October 1963. [5] The track to Ashbourne finally being lifted in 1964.

The track bed from Ashbourne to Parsley Hay was acquired by Derbyshire County Council and the Peak National Park in 1968 for a cycle and walking route. This, the Tissington Trail, was one of the first of such ventures in the country. Later, Ashbourne Tunnel was acquired by Sustrans.

Route

Preceding station Disused railways Following station
Tissington
Line and station closed
  LNWR
Ashbourne Line
  Ashbourne
Line and station closed

See also

Related Research Articles

Ashbourne, Derbyshire Human settlement in England

Ashbourne is a market town in the Derbyshire Dales, England, with a population of 8,377 in the 2011 census. It contains many historical buildings and independently owned shops, and offers a historic annual Shrovetide football match. Its position near the southern edge of the Peak District makes it the closest town to Dovedale, to which it is sometimes referred as the "gateway".

Cromford and High Peak Railway Early British railway company (1833–1871)

The Cromford and High Peak Railway (C&HPR) in Derbyshire, England, was completed in 1831, to carry minerals and goods between the Cromford Canal wharf at High Peak Junction and the Peak Forest Canal at Whaley Bridge. It dealt with the hilly rural terrain by using a number of inclines. It was closed by 1967, and the majority of the route, between Dowlow and Cromford, has become the High Peak Trail, a route on the National Cycle Network.

High Peak Trail Bridleway in the English Peak District

The High Peak Trail is a 17-mile (27 km) trail for walkers, cyclists and horse riders in the Peak District of England. Running from Dowlow (53.2059°N 1.8349°W), near Buxton, to High Peak Junction, Cromford (53.1004°N 1.5354°W), it follows the trackbed of the former Cromford and High Peak Railway, which was completed in 1831 to carry minerals and goods between the Cromford Canal wharf at High Peak Junction and the Peak Forest Canal at Whaley Bridge.

Tissington Trail Bridleway in the English Peak District

The Tissington Trail is a bridleway, footpath and cycleway in Derbyshire, England, along part of the trackbed of the former railway line connecting Ashbourne to Buxton. It takes its name from the village of Tissington, which it skirts. Opened in 1971, and now a part of the National Cycle Network, it stretches for 13 miles (21 km) from Parsley Hay (53.1706°N 1.7828°W) in the north to Ashbourne (53.0196°N 1.7397°W) in the south.

Thorpe, Derbyshire Human settlement in England

Thorpe is a village and civil parish in the English county of Derbyshire; it is on the Derbyshire/Staffordshire border, on the east bank of the River Dove, about four miles north of Ashbourne. The population of the civil parish as at the 2011 census was 183.

Parsley Hay railway station Former railway station in Derbyshire, England

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Norbury and Ellaston railway station was opened in 1852 by the North Staffordshire Railway at Norbury north of Ashbourne, Derbyshire.

Tissington railway station Former railway station in Derbyshire, England

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Alsop en le Dale railway station Former railway station in Derbyshire, England

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Hartington railway station Former railway station in Derbyshire, England

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Ashbourne railway station Former railway station in Derbyshire, England

Ashbourne railway station formerly served the town of Ashbourne in Derbyshire. There have been two stations in the town. The first, opened in 1852, was operated by the North Staffordshire Railway (NSR); it was replaced in 1899 by a station at a new location, jointly operated by the NSR and the London and North Western Railway (LNWR). In 1923 the station passed into the ownership of the London, Midland and Scottish Railway and in 1948 that of the London Midland Region of British Railways. It was finally closed to all traffic in 1963.

Bakewell railway station Former railway station in Derbyshire, England

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High Peak Junction

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White Peak Loop Trail Recreational trail in the English Peak District

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References

  1. 1 2 Quick 2019, p. 395.
  2. Jowett 1989, p. 62.
  3. Bentley & Fox 1997.
  4. McRae 1997, pp. 22 & 50.
  5. Hurst 1992, p. 23 (ref 1141).

Bibliography