Waverly, Alabama

Last updated

Waverly, Alabama
Town
Waverly, AL 2012.JPG
Waverly in 2012
Chambers County and Lee County Alabama Incorporated and Unincorporated areas Waverly Highlighted 0180256.svg
Location of Waverly in Chambers County and Lee County, Alabama.
Coordinates: 32°44′8″N85°34′27″W / 32.73556°N 85.57417°W / 32.73556; -85.57417 Coordinates: 32°44′8″N85°34′27″W / 32.73556°N 85.57417°W / 32.73556; -85.57417
CountryUnited States
State Alabama
Counties Chambers, Lee
Area
[1]
  Total2.74 sq mi (7.10 km2)
  Land2.72 sq mi (7.05 km2)
  Water0.02 sq mi (0.05 km2)
Elevation
761 ft (232 m)
Population
 (2010)
  Total145
  Estimate 
(2018) [2]
148
  Density54.33/sq mi (20.98/km2)
Time zone UTC-6 (CST)
  Summer (DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code
36879
Area code(s) 334
FIPS code 01-80256
GNIS feature ID0153904

Waverly is a town in Chambers and Lee counties in the U.S. state of Alabama. It is part of the Auburn Metropolitan Area. It was incorporated in 1910. [3] As of 2010, the town population was 145. [4]

Chambers County, Alabama County in the United States

Chambers County is a county of the U.S. state of Alabama. As of the 2010 census the population was 34,215. Its county seat is Lafayette. Its name is in honor of Henry H. Chambers, who served as a United States Senator from Alabama.

Lee County, Alabama County in the United States

Lee County is a county located in the east central portion of the U.S. state of Alabama. As of the 2010 census the population was 140,247. The county seat is Opelika, and the largest city is Auburn. The county is named for General Robert E. Lee (1807–1870), who served as General in Chief of the Armies of the Confederate States in 1865. Lee County comprises the Auburn-Opelika, AL Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is included in the Columbus-Auburn-Opelika, GA-AL Combined Statistical Area.

U.S. state constituent political entity of the United States

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are currently 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders. Four states use the term commonwealth rather than state in their full official names.

Contents

Waverly has an operating post office, and four churches are located in the town.

History

Waverly was settled in the 1830s, but saw little growth until the 1870s. The name of Waverly, Alabama first appeared on Alabama maps in 1853 (see reference below). It was given the nickname, Pea Ridge, but this was never its official name.

[5]

Annual Town Bar-B-Q

Beginning October 1990, and the second Saturday of each October since, the Town of Waverly hosts the Annual Waverly BBQ. Both pork and chicken BBQ, home made cakes and other sweets, cols, ice tea and lemonade are served. Town members all pitch in cooking, preparing the food,'stirring' the stew pot (a local tradition), and smoking the BBQ with hickory wood from the Friday night prior to the 'BBQ Day' at approximately 5:00pm, and continue this tradition until all the BBQ and stew is sold. Food is served to all attendees from 10:00am until 3:00pm. The event hosts singers, dancers, artists, arts and crafts, petting zoos, and other such events. This town get together serves as one of Waverly's largest fundraising events.

The Old 280 Boogie

The Old 280 Boogie; April 17, 2010. Old280Boogie2010.JPG
The Old 280 Boogie; April 17, 2010.

In 2000, the State of Alabama rerouted U.S. Highway 280 south of the town of Waverly instead of routing it through town. This decision meant the town was saved from destruction. [6] To celebrate, residents in 2001 decided to hold an annual "Waverly Boogie" (or "Old 280 Boogie"), a multi-cultural festival typically held on the third Saturday in April. The event, featuring a wide variety of musicians and visual artists, is held in an open-air amphitheater. [6]

Alabama Department of Transportation government agency

The Department is organized into five geographic regions, with a Central Office located in Montgomery, AL. The Central Office is organized into the Office of the Transportation Director and the Office of the Chief Engineer. The five Region Engineers report to the director and Deputy Director, Operations. The organization of the various bureaus and offices are designed to report to the director and the deputy directors, Chief Engineer, or the Assistant Chief Engineers. The Department has several boards and committees that operate either within a bureau or as a cooperative effort among several bureaus or regions.

Centro-Matic American band from Denton, Texas

Centro-matic was an American band based in Denton, Texas.

Hurray for the Riff Raff

Hurray for the Riff Raff is an Americana band from New Orleans, Louisiana. It was formed by Alynda Segarra, a singer-songwriter from the Bronx, New York, after she had moved to New Orleans in 2007.

The Pine Hill Haints

The Pine Hill Haints are an American traditional bluegrass/folk/honky tonk/country band from Alabama, though the band members themselves describe their unique southern roots music as "Alabama Ghost Music."

Additionally, in 2014, Standard Deluxe hosted its first annual Heart of Waverly Bluegrass Festival. [8] [9] Performers included Larry Keel & Natural Bridge, Packway Handle Band, Dread Clampitt, Dead Winter Carpenters, Dooley's Blue Revue and Blackbird Pickers.

Geography

Waverly is in the southwest corner of Chambers County at 32°44'8.369" North, 85°34'27.736" West (32.735658, −85.574371). [10] The town limit extends south into Lee County. According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 2.7 square miles (7.1 km2), of which 0.02 square miles (0.05 km2), or 0.68%, is water. [4]

United States Census Bureau Bureau of the United States responsible for the census and related statistics

The United States Census Bureau is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce and its director is appointed by the President of the United States.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1920 208
1930 38384.1%
1940 321−16.2%
1950 306−4.7%
1960 250−18.3%
1970 247−1.2%
1980 228−7.7%
1990 152−33.3%
2000 18421.1%
2010 145−21.2%
Est. 2018148 [2] 2.1%
U.S. Decennial Census [11]
2013 Estimate [12]

As of the census [13] of 2000, there were 184 people, 76 households and 50 families living in the town. The population density was 67.3 people per square mile (26.0/km2). There were 87 housing units at an average density of 31.8 per square mile (12.3/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 80.98% White and 19.02% Black or African American.

There were 76 households out of which 28.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.6% were married couples living together, 11.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.9% were non-families. 32.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.42 and the average family size was 3.12.

In the town, the population was spread out with 24.5% under the age of 18, 7.6% from 18 to 24, 31.5% from 25 to 44, 20.1% from 45 to 64, and 16.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 102.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and older, there were 95.8 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $32,917, and the median income for a family was $38,750. Males had a median income of $26,625 while it was $16,071 for females. The per-capita income for the town was $18,406. About 3.7% of families and 7.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including none of those younger than 18 or 65 or older.

Notable person

Works or publications

See also

Related Research Articles

Coosa County, Alabama County in the United States

Coosa County is a county of the U.S. state of Alabama. As of the 2010 census the population was 11,539. Its county seat is Rockford. Its name derives from a town of the Creek tribe and the Coosa River, which forms one of the county borders.

Randolph County, Alabama County in the United States

Randolph County is a county on the central eastern border of the U.S. state of Alabama. As of the 2010 census, the population was 22,913. Its county seat is Wedowee. Its name is in honor of John Randolph, a member of the United States Senate from Virginia. Randolph County was a prohibition or dry county until 2012, when the citizens of Randolph County voted to repeal prohibition.

Talladega County, Alabama County in the United States

Talladega County is a county of the U.S. state of Alabama. As of the 2010 census, the population was 82,291. Its county seat is Talladega.

Tallapoosa County, Alabama County in the United States

Tallapoosa County is a county located in the east central portion of the U.S. state of Alabama. As of the 2010 census, the population was 41,616. Its county seat is Dadeville.

Louisville, Alabama Town in Alabama, United States

Louisville is a town in Barbour County, Alabama, United States. Originally named "Lewisville" and still pronounced as such. At the 2010 census the population was 519.

Five Points, Alabama Town in Alabama, United States

Five Points is a town in Chambers County, Alabama, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 141.

Ranburne, Alabama Town in Alabama, United States

Ranburne is a town in Cleburne County, Alabama, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 409.

Repton, Alabama Town in Alabama, United States

Repton is a town in Conecuh County, Alabama, United States. It was incorporated on January 10, 1899. At the 2010 census the population was 282.

Mentone, Alabama Town in Alabama, United States

Mentone is a town in DeKalb County, Alabama, United States. Mentone, located atop Lookout Mountain, has the highest elevation of any incorporated town in Alabama, narrowly over Hytop.

Killen, Alabama Town in Alabama, United States

Killen is a town in Lauderdale County, Alabama, United States. It is part of the Florence - Muscle Shoals Metropolitan Statistical Area known as "The Shoals". It was incorporated in 1957. As of the 2010 census, the population of the town is 1,108, down from its record high of 1,119 in 2000.

Phenix City, Alabama City in Alabama, United States

Phenix City is a city in Lee and Russell counties in the State of Alabama, and the county seat of Russell County. As of the 2010 census, the population of the city was 32,822.

Vincent, Alabama City in Alabama, United States

Vincent, originally known as Propel or Propel, is a city in Shelby, St. Clair, and Talladega counties in the U.S. state of Alabama. At the 2010 census the population was 1,988. The community was first known as Propel, but later named Vincent in honor of the Vincent family, who were early settlers of the area. It was incorporated in 1897.

Oak Hill, Alabama Town in Alabama, United States

Oak Hill is a town in Wilcox County, Alabama, United States. According to the 1940 U.S. Census, it incorporated in 1938. The population was 26 at the 2010 census, down from 37 in 2000. It is the second smallest incorporated town in Alabama as of 2010, behind McMullen. However, the smallest unincorporated census-designated place in the state is also located in Wilcox County, that of Catherine, which had 22 residents as of 2010. With a median household income of $9,286, Oak Hill is the poorest community in Alabama.

Waverly Hall, Georgia Town in Georgia, United States

Waverly Hall is a town in Harris County, Georgia, United States. It is part of the Columbus, Georgia-Alabama Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 735 at the 2010 census, and in 2015 the estimated population was 823.

McEwen, Tennessee City in Tennessee, United States

McEwen is a city in Humphreys County, Tennessee, United States. The population was 1,750 at the 2010 census.

Hartland, Shawano County, Wisconsin Town in Wisconsin, United States

Hartland is a town in Shawano County, Wisconsin, United States. The population was 825 at the 2000 census. The unincorporated community of Slab City is located within the town. The unincorporated communities of Frazer Corners and Zachow are also located partially in the town. Hartland was established in 1859.

Sherman, New York Town in New York, United States

Sherman is a town in Chautauqua County, New York, United States. It is an interior town in the county, west of Chautauqua Lake. As of the 2010 census, the town population was 1,653. The town contains the village of Sherman.

Standard Deluxe Design and silkscreen print shop located in Waverly, Alabama that sponsors live music festival called Waverly “Old 280” Boogie.

Standard Deluxe Inc. is a design and silkscreen print shop located in Waverly, Alabama. Standard Deluxe sponsors a live music festival each

References

  1. "2018 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 4, 2019.
  2. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved June 4, 2019.
  3. https://books.google.com/books?id=yig3_DMbQwYC&pg=PA188&lpg=PA188&dq=%22waverly%22+%22incorporated%22+%22chambers%22+%22lee+county%22&source=bl&ots=rasLLMoaWN&sig=jeqAnw_tWo-BXq0Nc6pEQ27AGUA&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj6j9PeiOjKAhVLwiYKHQehC2kQ6AEILTAD#v=onepage&q=%22waverly%22%20%22incorporated%22%20%22chambers%22%20%22lee%20county%22&f=false
  4. 1 2 "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Waverly town, Alabama". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved June 3, 2014.
  5. 1853 Waverly is already on the map http://cartweb.geography.ua.edu/lizardtech/iserv/calcrgn?cat=North%20America%20and%20United%20States&item=States/Alabama/alabama1853a.sid&wid=1000&hei=900&props=item(Name,Description),cat(Name,Description)&style=simple/view-dhtml.xsl
  6. 1 2 Reece, Chuck (August 2014). "Rednecks, Hippies & Graphic Design: The Unlikely Cool of Waverly, Alabama". The Bitter Southerner. Retrieved August 10, 2014.
  7. Landers, Emily (April 16, 2014). "Waverly hosts 280 Boogie this weekend". The Corner News. Retrieved September 15, 2014.
  8. Landers, Emily (March 26, 2014). "Standard Deluxe to host first Heart of Waverly Bluegrass Festival". The Corner News. Retrieved September 15, 2014.
  9. "Standard Deluxe to host first Heart of Waverly Bluegrass Festival". The Corner News. February 26, 2014. Retrieved September 15, 2014.
  10. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  11. "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved June 6, 2013.
  12. "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013" . Retrieved June 3, 2014.
  13. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved January 31, 2008.