Winnipeg City Council

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The Winnipeg City Council (French : Conseil municipal de Winnipeg) is the governing body of the city of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. The Council is seated in the Council Building of Winnipeg City Hall. [1] [2]

Contents

The composition of the Council consists of 15 city councillors and a mayor. Each councillor represents an individual ward throughout the city while the mayor is elected every four years by a vote of the city-at-large. [3]

Overview

Part 3 of The City of Winnipeg Charter [4] legislates the composition of Winnipeg City Council, which currently consists of 15 councillors and the Mayor. Each councillor represents an individual ward while the mayor is elected by a vote of the city-at-large. [3]

Councillors have a dual role: they are members of Council, dealing with decisions that affect the whole city; and members of the Community Committees, dealing with issues within local communities. [3]

Wards

Current wards

NamePopulation (2016) [5]
St. James 49,118
Point Douglas 47,063
St. Norbert - Seine River47,765
St. Vital 49,377
Charleswood - Tuxedo - Westwood 45,947
North Kildonan 44,664
Waverley West 44,006
St. Boniface 47,174
Mynarski 49,808
Fort Rouge - East Fort Garry 46,770
River Heights - Fort Garry 50,667
Old Kildonan 47,155
Daniel McIntyre 46,882
Elmwood - East Kildonan 44,268
Transcona 44,581

Past wards

Into its first civic election on 5 January 1874, Winnipeg had a total of 4 city wards—North, South, East, and West. [6]

The city's wards were reorganized in 1881, with the addition of Fort Rouge as Ward One, and existing wards to the north of the Assiniboine River being reorganized into Wards Two through Six. In 1906, Elmwood was added as Ward Seven in 1906, becoming was the city's first extension across the Red River. These seven wards were collapsed into three in 1920: Wards One and Two became Ward One; Wards Three and Four became Ward Two; and Wards Five, Six, and Seven became Ward Three. [6]

Following the amalgamation of Winnipeg, the new unified Council represented 50 wards. [7] [8]

History

Early years

Winnipeg officially became incorporated as a city on 8 November 1873, with the passing of An Act to Incorporate the City of Winnipeg by the Manitoba Legislature. Among other things, the Act outlined the essential powers for Winnipeg City Council. The Act also dictated qualifications for candidates who wished to run for mayor or alderman in the city’s first election. They had to be male freeholders or householders; natural born or naturalized subjects of the British Crown; 21 years of age or more; and resident in the city for at least 3 months prior to the election. [6]

With a total of 4 city wards—North, South, East, and West—Winnipeg's first civic election took place on 5 January 1874, resulting in the election of Francis Evans Cornish as the first mayor of Winnipeg. In addition, the city’s first elected aldermen were: [6]

At this time, the mayor was elected for a one-year term; this would remain until 1955, when the term of office for the mayor was changed to two years. The first Winnipeg City Council established standing committees on finance, printing, board of works, markets, fire & water, and assessment. Council subsequently began to establish itself through the passage of by-laws, with 27 by-laws being passed in the city’s first year of incorporation. After the first election, candidates were required to meet a property qualification; this requirement for alderman was abolished in 1918 and for mayoralty candidates in 1920 through a Charter amendment. [6]

The city's wards were reorganized in 1881, with the addition of Fort Rouge as Ward One, and existing wards to the north of the Assiniboine River being reorganized into Wards Two through Six. In 1906, Elmwood was added as Ward Seven in 1906, becoming was the city's first extension across the Red River. These seven wards were collapsed into three in 1920: Wards One and Two became Ward One; Wards Three and Four became Ward Two; and Wards Five, Six, and Seven became Ward Three. [6]

While the norm in the city's early years was for local elected officials to be English Protestants, there were still exceptions who won elections: Arni Frederickson (Ward 5, 1891) and Arni Eggertson (Ward 4, 1906) were Icelandic; Moses Finkelstein and Altar Skaletar (Ward 5, 1912) were Jewish; and Theodore Stefanik (Ward 5, 1911) was the first Ukrainian elected to City Council. [6]

Over a decade after the first election, in 1887, civic suffrage was afforded to women in Winnipeg, 80 of whom being eligible to vote in that year's civic election and 476 in the election of 1888. [6] In regards to holding office, however, women would not able to in Winnipeg until 1916, after which Alice A. Holling in 1917 (Ward 7) became the first woman to run for Council. (Holling lost to Alexander McLennan, 693 to 358.) In December 1920, Jessie Kirk became the first woman elected to Council, serving a two-year term on Council for Ward 2; she was, however, defeated each time in subsequent elections in 1922, 1923, 1926, and 1934. [6]

The 1920 election that elected Jessie Kirk also saw city elections begin to use proportional representation in the form of Single Transferable Voting. Often mixed crops of councillors were elected in the multi-member wards, with each voter casting only one (transferable) vote. PR was used until 1970 for city elections. (STV was also used to elect Winnipeg MLAs from 1920 to 1952.)

The 1922 election elected Edward Parnell as mayor. He is only Winnipeg mayor to die in office, passing on June 9 of the following year. [9]

Metro Winnipeg

In 1955, the Government of Manitoba created the Greater Winnipeg Investigating Commission to look into inter-municipal issues in the Greater Winnipeg area. The Commission took four years and concluded with the recommendation that a strong central government be formed, which resulted in the incorporation of the Metropolitan Corporation of Greater Winnipeg (Metro Winnipeg) in 1960. [10]

From 1960 until 1971, the Metro Winnipeg administrative system included Winnipeg and 12 other municipalities under a single metropolitan government, in a "two-tier" system in which councillors were elected through single transferable vote. In this framework, each municipality managed their own affairs, levied their own taxes, and took responsibility for local roads, water, and parks. In addition to this, however, an additional metropolitan level of government existed as well, which held responsibility for planning major roads, parks, and water and sewer systems. [11] [12] :vii

In the late 1960s, a reform model was proposed for making this system more efficient and coordinated. Under this model, the coordination of policy and administration was to be facilitated by the close cooperation of a Board of Commissioners, who would act as the senior officers of the city's civil service, and the 50-member City Council with its 3 standing committees (Finance, Environment, and Works and Operations). In order to deliver services at the local level, the city was to be divided into 13 community committee areas, with each community committee composed of the City Councillors within the given community's boundaries. [13] :162

Unicity

On 27 July 1971, the City of Winnipeg Act incorporated the City of Winnipeg (1874–1971); the rural municipalities of Charleswood, Fort Garry, North Kildonan, and Old Kildonan; the Town of Tuxedo; the cities of East Kildonan, West Kildonan, St. Vital, Transcona, St. Boniface, and St. James-Assiniboia; and the Metropolitan Corporation of Greater Winnipeg into one city, commonly referred to as unicity. [7]

The unicity system replaced the two-tier metropolitan system with first-past-the-post voting.

The election of the first new Winnipeg City Council was held on 6 October 1971 and the new City came into legal existence on 1 January 1972. Beginning in 1972, the new unified Council consisted of 50 councillors, one elected from each of the city's 50 wards, and a mayor, elected by voters in the city-at-large. [7] [8] The inaugural meeting of the new City Council subsequently took place in the Council Chamber of the Winnipeg Civic Centre on 4 January 1972. [14]

The number of councillors were reduced to 29 part-time councilors in 1977. [8] It was then further reduced to 15 full-time councillors in 1991 when the Government of Manitoba passed Bill 68, which took effect in the 1992 municipal election and has stayed the same for subsequent elections. [15]

List of Winnipeg City Councils

2018-2022

Councillor [16] WardRole(s) [17]
Brian Bowman N/AMayor
John OrlikowRiver Heights - Fort GarryDeputy Mayor

Council Representative – Partnership of the Capital Region

Vivian SantosPoint DouglasActing Deputy Mayor

Chairperson – Mayor’s Advisory Committee on Heritage, Culture & Art

Kevin KleinCharleswood - Tuxedo - WestwoodCouncillor Responsible for Assiniboine Park Conservancy
Cindy GilroyDaniel McIntyreChairperson – Winnipeg Housing Steering Committee

Secretary of the End Homelessness Strategies

UN Women Safe Cities Global Initiative Steering Committee

Jason SchreyerElmwood - East Kildonan
Sherri RollinsFort Rouge - East Fort GarryCouncil Representative – Mayor’s Indigenous Advisory Council
Ross EadieMynarskiDeputy Speaker
Jeff BrowatyNorth Kildonan
Devi SharmaOld KildonanSpeaker
Matt AllardSt. BonifaceCouncil Liaison – Francophone and Francophile Cities Network

Council Liaison – Intermodal Connectivity

Council Liaison – Labour Relations

Scott GillinghamSt. JamesCouncil Representative – Partnership of the Capital Region

Council Liaison – Veteran and Military Affairs

North American Strategy for Competitiveness (NASCO)

Markus ChambersSt. Norbert - Seine RiverChairperson – Winnipeg Police Board
Brian MayesSt. VitalCouncillor Responsible for Assiniboine Park Conservancy

Council Liaison – School Board and Youth Opportunities

Shawn NasonTranscona
Janice LukesWaverley West

2014-2018

Councillor [18] WardRoles
Brian Bowman N/AMayor
Jenny GerbasiFort Rouge-East Fort GarryDeputy Mayor
Cindy GilroyDaniel McIntyreActing Deputy Mayor
Marty Morantz Charleswood-Tuxedo
Jason SchreyerElmwood-East Kildonan
Ross EadieMynarski
Jeff BrowatyNorth Kildonan
Devi SharmaOld Kildonan
Mike PagtakhanPoint Douglas
John OrlikowRiver Heights-Fort Garry
Matt AllardSt. Boniface
Shawn DobsonSt. Charles
Scott GillinghamSt. James-Brooklands
Janice LukesSt. Norbert
Brian MayesSt. Vital
Russ Wyatt Transcona

2010-2014

CouncillorWardRolesNotes
Sam Katz N/AMayor
Jeff BrowatyNorth Kildonan
Ross EadieMynarski
Scott Fielding St. James-Brooklands
Jenny GerbasiFort Rouge-East Fort Garry
Paula HavixbeckCharleswood-Tuxedo
Brian MayesSt. VitalElected in by-election on November 26, 2011, following resignation of Gord Steeves.
Grant NordmanSt. CharlesActing Deputy Mayor and Council Speaker
John OrlikowRiver Heights-Fort Garry
Mike PagtakhanPoint DouglasDeputy Speaker
Devi SharmaOld Kildonan
Harvey Smith Daniel McIntyre
Thomas Steen Elmwood-East Kildonan
Gord SteevesSt. VitalResigned in 2011 to run in the provincial election.
Justin SwandelSt. NorbertDeputy Mayor (2010-2014)
Dan Vandal St. BonifaceFormer Deputy Mayor (2003-2004)
Russ Wyatt Transcona

2006-2010

CouncillorWardRolesNotes
Sam Katz N/AMayor
Jeff BrowatyNorth Kildonan
Bill Clement†Charleswood-TuxedoDied May 3, 2010.
Scott Fielding St. James-Brooklands
Jenny GerbasiFort Rouge-East Fort Garry
Harry LazarenkoMynarski
Brenda LeipsicRiver Heights-Fort GarryDeputy Mayor (2006-2008)Died December 9, 2008.
Grant NordmanSt. Charles
Mike O'ShaughnessyOld Kildonan
John OrlikowRiver Heights-Fort GarryElected in by-election on March 17, 2009.
Mike PagtakhanPoint Douglas
Harvey Smith Daniel McIntyre
Gord SteevesSt. Vital
Justin SwandelSt. NorbertDeputy Mayor (2008-2010)
Lillian Thomas Elmwood-East Kildonan
Dan Vandal St. BonifaceFormer Deputy Mayor (2003-2004)
Russ Wyatt Transcona

Pre-Unicity municipalities

Reeves and mayors of the municipalities within the Greater Winnipeg area prior to their amalgamation into Winnipeg on 27 July 1971.

Municipality (Type) [10] Incorporation or First electionFirst reeve/mayor
Assiniboia (RM, city)
  • 1880
  • 1969 (City of St. James-Assiniboia)
Charleswood (RM)1913 George Chapman
East Kildonan (RM, city)
  • 1914 (RM)
  • 1957 (city)
Fort Garry (RM)1912 R. A. C. Manning
North Kildonan (RM)1924 H. C. Whellams
Old Kildonan (RM)1921 Charles A. Tanner
St. Boniface (RM, town, city)
  • 1880 (RM)
  • 1883 (town)
  • 1908 (city)
St. James (RM, city)
  • 1921 (RM)
  • 1956 (City of St. James; later St. James-Assiniboia)
St. Vital (RM, city)
  • 1909 (RM)
  • 1962 (city)
Transcona (town, city)
  • 1912
  • 1961
Tuxedo (town)1913 Frederick William Heubach
West Kildonan (RM, town, city)
  • 1914 (RM)
  • 1921 (town)
  • 1961 (city)

Organizations under Council

Committees

Section 63(1) of The City of Winnipeg Charter [4] allows Winnipeg City Council the authority to establish committees of Council. Through by-law, Council is able to delegate powers, duties, or functions to a committee. Committees include standing committees and community committees. [19]

The first Winnipeg City Council established standing committees on finance, printing, board of works, markets, fire & water, and assessment. Council subsequently began to establish itself through the passage of by-laws, with 27 by-laws being passed in the city’s first year of incorporation. [6]

Each of the 15 Councillors represents a ward within Winnipeg, with three wards composing a Community Committee. The five Community Committees of the 2018-2022 period are [20]

The Winnipeg City Council has established six standing policy committees for the period of 1 November 2020 to 31 October 2021, some having ad-hoc committees of their own: [17]

In addition, the Executive Policy Committee is composed of Mayor Brian Bowman (Chairperson) and Councillors Matt Allard, Jeff Browaty, Scott Gillingham, Cindy Gilroy, Brian Mayes, and Sherri Rollins. [17] This Committee also includes the Ad Hoc Committee on Development Standards. [21]

Boards and commissions

Responsibility over the management and administration of certain public services have been delegated by Winnipeg City Council to autonomous organizations (boards and commissions). These boards and commissions are appointed, wholly or partly, by Council and are granted authority either by the relevant Council by-laws or by Act of the Manitoba Legislature. A majority of these boards and commissions are composed of members of the public, as well as members of Council. [21]

As of 2021, the following are the existing boards and commissions of Council: [21]

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References

  1. "Winnipeg City Hall Pamphlet." City of Winnipeg Archives, City Clerk's Department.
  2. "City Hall: The Heart of Winnipeg's Decision Making". Heritage Winnipeg. Retrieved 2021-01-29.
  3. 1 2 3 City Clerk. "Mayor and City Council." City of Winnipeg. Retrieved 2021 June 10.
  4. 1 2 The City of Winnipeg Charter, S.M. 2002, c. 39
  5. https://www.winnipeg.ca/clerks/WardsBoundaries/pdfs/2017_WBC_Final_Report.pdf
  6. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 https://winnipeg.ca/clerks/archives/pathways/AnActOfImagination.stm#
  7. 1 2 3 "History of City government". City of Winnipeg. Retrieved 2021-06-10.
  8. 1 2 3 Boyens, Ingeborg (1979-03-20). "City debates Council's wages". Winnipeg Free Press.
  9. Leah, Pages from the Past, p. 140
  10. 1 2 Archives and Records Control. "More than the Sum of its Parts Exhibit". City Clerk's Department, City of Winnipeg. Retrieved 2021-06-10.
  11. "Forty years after its inception, Unicity is generally considered a noble failure". uniter.ca. Retrieved 2021-06-10.
  12. Klos, Nancy. 1998. "The State of Unicity—25 Years Later: Conference Proceedings (October 3-4, 1997)." Winnipeg: Institute of Urban Studies. hdl : 10680/1202 .
  13. https://www.winnipegarchitecture.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/A-City-at-Leisure.pdf
  14. "History of City government". City of Winnipeg. Retrieved 2021-02-08.
  15. Rollason, Kevin (1991-07-24). "City could save $500,000 yearly under Tory bill". Winnipeg Free Press.
  16. City of Winnipeg (2020). "2018 - 2022 City Council". City of Winnipeg. Retrieved 2021-01-24.
  17. 1 2 3 https://winnipeg.ca/clerks/boards/pdfs/EPCStandingCommitteesMembers.pdf
  18. Winnipeg, City of. "2014 City Council - City of Winnipeg". www.winnipeg.ca. Retrieved 2021-01-25.
  19. https://winnipeg.ca/clerks/council/committees.stm
  20. https://winnipeg.ca/clerks/pdfs/CommunityCommitteeMembers.pdf
  21. 1 2 3 4 https://winnipeg.ca/clerks/boards/boards.stm