1948 in India

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1948
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India

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Timeline of Indian history

Events in the year 1948 in India.

Incumbents

George VI King of the United Kingdom

George VI was King of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Commonwealth from 11 December 1936 until his death on 6 February 1952. He was the last Emperor of India and the first Head of the Commonwealth.

C. Rajagopalachari Political leader

Chakravarti Rajagopalachari, informally called Rajaji or C.R., was an Indian politician, independence activist, lawyer, writer, historian and statesman. Rajagopalachari was the last Governor-General of India, as India soon became a Republic in 1950. Furthermore, he was the first Indian-born governor-general, since before him the posts were held by British nationals. He also served as leader of the Indian National Congress, Premier of the Madras Presidency, Governor of West Bengal, Minister for Home Affairs of the Indian Union and Chief Minister of Madras state. Rajagopalachari founded the Swatantra Party and was one of the first recipients of India's highest civilian award, the Bharat Ratna. He vehemently opposed the use of nuclear weapons and was a proponent of world peace and disarmament. During his lifetime, he also acquired the nickname 'Mango of Krishnagiri'.

Prime Minister of India Leader of the executive of the Government of India

The Prime Minister of India is the leader of the executive of the Government of India. The prime minister is also the chief adviser to the President of India and head of the Council of Ministers. They can be a member of any of the two houses of the Parliament of India—the Lok Sabha and the Rajya Sabha —but has to be a member of the political party or coalition, having a majority in the Lok Sabha.

Events

Assassination of Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi: The Martyr's Column at the Gandhi Smriti, (Birla House), the spot where Gandhi was assassinated. Gandhi Smriti Delhi.jpg
Assassination of Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi: The Martyr's Column at the Gandhi Smriti, (Birla House), the spot where Gandhi was assassinated.
Mahatma Gandhi Pre-eminent leader of Indian nationalism during British-ruled India

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was an Indian activist who was the leader of the Indian independence movement against British colonial rule. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The honorific Mahātmā was applied to him first in 1914 in South Africa – is now used worldwide. In India, he was also called Bapu, a term that he preferred and Gandhi ji, and is known as the Father of the Nation.

Nathuram Godse Hindu assassin of Mahatma Gandhi

Nathuram Vinayak Godse was a right-wing advocate of Hindu nationalism who assassinated Mahatma Gandhi in New Delhi on 30 January 1948. He shot Gandhi in the chest three times at point-blank range. Godse was a member of the right-wing nationalist organisation Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS); he believed that Gandhi favoured the political demands of India's Muslims during the partition of India.

Junagadh City in Gujarat, India

Junagadhpronunciation  is the headquarters of Junagadh district in the Indian state of Gujarat. The city is the 7th largest in Gujarat, located at the foot of the Girnar hills, 355 km southwest of the state capitals Gandhinagar and Ahmedabad. Literally translated, Junagadh means "Old Fort". An alternate etymology gives the name as coming from "Yonagadh", literally "City of the Yona (Greeks)," referring to the ancient inhabitants of the city under the Indo-Greek Kingdom. It is also known as "Sorath", the name of the earlier princely state of Junagadh. After a brief struggle between India and Pakistan, Junagadh joined India on November 9, 1947. It was a part of Saurashtra state and later Bombay state. In 1960, after the Maha Gujarat movement, it became part of the newly formed Gujarat state.

Births

Shobhaa De Indian journalist and novelist

Shobha Rajadhyaksha, also known as Shobha Dey, is an Indian columnist and novelist. De is best known for her depiction of socialites and sex in her works of fiction, for which she has come to be known as the "Jackie Collins of India".

Bal Govind Dwivedi is a prolific Hindi poet.

Danny Denzongpa Indian actor

Danny Denzongpa is an Indian film actor, singer and film director of Sikkimese-Bhutia descent. He has mainly worked in Bollywood films, though he has also appeared in several Nepali, Tamil, Bengali and Telugu films. He has acted in about 190 Hindi films since 1971. In 2003, Denzongpa was awarded the Padma Shree, India's fourth-highest civilian honour. His film career spans more than 4 decades.

Full date unknown

Anant Nag actor and politician from Karnataka

Anant Nagarkatte known as Anant Nag, is an Indian actor, known primarily for his work in Kannada cinema, and in addition he appeared in Marathi, Tamil, Malayalam, Telugu and Hindi movies. He acted in Malgudi Days, directed by his younger brother Shankar Nag, based on the stories by R. K. Narayan. He is fluent in Kannada, Konkani, Marathi and Hindi. He won six Filmfare Awards South and five Karnataka State Film Awards.

Dr Dharanidhar Sahu is an English writer from India. He is a professor in English and currently teaches at Berhampur University, Orissa, India.

Deaths

Indian independence movement Indian struggle for freedom from British

The Indian independence movement was a series of activities whose ultimate aim was to end the British Raj and encompassed activities and ideas aiming to end the East India Company rule (1757–1857) and the British Raj (1857–1947) in the Indian subcontinent. The movement spanned a total of 90 years (1857–1947) considering movement against British Indian Empire. The Indian Independence movement includes both protest and militant (violent) mechanisms to root out British Administration from India.

Assassination murder of a prominent person, often a political leader or ruler

Assassination is the act of killing a prominent person for either political, religious or monetary reasons.

Jatindramohan Bagchi Bengali poet and writer

Jatindramohan Bagchi was a Bengali poet and editor.

See also

Related Research Articles

Princely state Type of vassal state

A princely state, also called native state, feudatory state or Indian state, was a vassal state under a local or regional ruler in a subsidiary alliance with the British Raj. Though the history of the princely states of the subcontinent dates from at least the classical period of Indian history, the predominant usage of the term princely state specifically refers to a semi-sovereign principality on the Indian subcontinent during the British Raj that was not directly governed by the British, but rather by a local ruler, subject to a form of indirect rule on some matters. In actual fact, the imprecise doctrine of paramountcy allowed the government of British India to interfere in the internal affairs of princely states individually or collectively and issue edicts that applied to all of India when it deemed it necessary.

Events in the year 1931 in India.

Events in the year 1944 in India.

Rajpramukh

Rajpramukh was an administrative title in India which existed from India's independence in 1947 until 1956. Rajpramukhs were the appointed governors of certain of India's provinces and states.

Events in the year 1869 in India.

Indian Independence Act 1947 1947 UK parliament act

The 1947 Indian Independence Act is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that partitioned British India into the two new independent dominions of India and Pakistan. The Act received the royal assent on 18 July 1947, and thus modern-day Pakistan and India came into being on 15 August.

Instrument of Accession Treaty for princely states to join India or Pakistan

The Instrument of Accession was a legal document first introduced by the Government of India Act 1935 and used in 1947 to enable each of the rulers of the princely states under British paramountcy to join one of the new dominions of India or Pakistan created by the Partition of British India.

Dominion of India Period of Indian history

India was an independent dominion in the British Commonwealth of Nations with King George VI as the head of state between gaining independence from the United Kingdom on 15 August 1947 and the proclamation of a republic on 26 January 1950. It was created by the Indian Independence Act 1947 and was transformed into the Republic of India by the promulgation of the Constitution of India in 1950.

Samaldas Gandhi was an Indian freedom fighter who headed the Aarzi Hukumat or Temporary Government of the erstwhile princely state of Junagadh.

Political integration of India India was divided into two sets of territories, one under direct British rule

At the time of Indian independence in 1947, India was divided into two sets of territories, one under direct British rule, and the other under the suzerainty of the British Crown, with control over their internal affairs remaining in the hands of their hereditary rulers. The latter included 554 princely states, having different types of revenue sharing arrangements with the British, often depending on their size, population and local conditions. In addition, there were several colonial enclaves controlled by France and Portugal. The political integration of these territories into India was a declared objective of the Indian National Congress, and the Government of India pursued this over the next decade. Through a combination of factors, Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel and V. P. Menon convinced most of the rulers of the various princely states to accede to India. Having secured their accession, they then proceeded, in a step-by-step process, to secure and extend the central government's authority over these states and transform their administrations until, by 1956, there was little difference between the territories that had been part of British India and those that had been princely states. Simultaneously, the Government of India, through a combination of diplomatic and military means, acquired de facto and de jure control over the remaining colonial enclaves, which too were integrated into India.

Events from the year 1947 in Pakistan.

Annexation of Junagadh

Junagadh was a princely state of British India, located in what is now Gujarat, outside but under the suzerainty of British India.

Vijayarajaji Indian ornithologist

Maharajadhiraj Mirza Maharao Sri Sir Vijayarajaji Khengarji Sawai Bahadur, GBE was the ruling Rao of Cutch from 1942 to his death in 1948.

Sir Muhammad Mahabat Khanji III Rasul Khanji,, was the last ruling Nawab of Junagadh of the princely state of Junagadh in British India/India from 1911 to 1948. He was the father of Muhammad Dilawar Khanji – Former Governor of Sindh and his claimed successor. Famed for his extravagant lifestyle and his love of dogs, his decision to accede Junagadh to the Dominion of Pakistan following India's Independence led to the Indian Army taking military action. He is credited with pioneering a conservation effort that saved India's last few lions from almost certain extinction.

Junagadh State

Junagadh was a princely state in Gujarat ruled by the Muslim Babi or Babai dynasty in British India, until its integration into the Indian Union in 1948.

Hyderabad State (1948–56) former state of India

Hyderabad State was a state in Independent India, formed after the accession of the princely state of Hyderabad into the Indian Union on 24 November 1949. It existed from 1948 to 1956.

The princely states of Pakistan were former princely states of the British Indian Empire which acceded to the new Dominion of Pakistan between 1947 and 1948, following the Partition of (British) India and its independence.

A standstill agreement was an agreement signed between the newly independent dominions of India and Pakistan and the princely states of the British Indian Empire prior to their integration in the new dominions. The form of the agreement was bilateral between a dominion and a princely state. It provided that all the administrative arrangements then existing between the British Crown and the state would continue unaltered between the signatory dominion and the princely state, until new arrangements were made.

Gandhi family

The Gandhi family is the family of Mohandas Gandhi. Gandhi was the distinguished leader of the Indian independence movement in British-ruled India. Mahatma Gandhi is also called the Father of the Nation or "Bapu" as the prime minister called him at his funeral; a title given to him by Subhas Chandra Bose on 6 July 1944 during his address on the Singapore Radio. On 28 April 1947, Sarojini Naidu too referred Gandhi with the title Father of the Nation. Gandhi is also referred to as Bapu (Gujarati: endearment for "father", in India. In common parlance in India he is often called Gandhi ji. An anonymous journalist from Jetpur town in Saurashtra he has also been referd to as Gae-ndy or Ga-ndhi as in the a makes an "ah" sound, in an anonymous letter referred Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi as Mahatma, for the first time while he was still in South Africa. Gandhi's family consists of him, his wife and his four sons.