2021 London Marathon

Last updated

41st London Marathon
2021 London Marathon logo.png
Venue London, England
Date3 October 2021
Champions
Men Sisay Lemma (2:04:01)
Women Joyciline Jepkosgei (02:17:43)
Wheelchair men Marcel Hug (1:26:27)
Wheelchair women Manuela Schär (1:39:52)
  2020
2022  

The 2021 London Marathon was the 41st running of the annual London Marathon on 3 October 2021. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the race was postponed from April until October to maximise the chances of a mass participation event.

Contents

The elite events were won by Sisay Lemma of Ethiopia and Joyciline Jepkosgei of Kenya, in 2:04:01 and 2:17:43, respectively. The wheelchair races were won by Marcel Hug and Manuela Schär, both of Switzerland, in 1:26:27 and 1:39:52, respectively. Both Hug and Schär set course records, with Hug breaking Australian Kurt Fearnley's record of 1:28:57 set in 2009, and Schär breaking her own record of 1:39:57 set in 2017.

Background

The Mall, the location of the finish of the race. The mall london.jpg
The Mall, the location of the finish of the race.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the race was postponed from April until October to maximise the chances of a mass participation event. [1] The race was run on 3 October, and was the second of the five World Marathon Majors held in 2021; all events in the series are being run in the space of six weeks between late September and early November. [2] [lower-alpha 1] All competitors in the elite event had to take regular COVID PCR tests, whilst those in the mass participation event had to provide proof of a negative lateral flow test. [4] Elite African athletes were flown to the event on charter planes to minimise the COVID-19 risk. [5] Approximately 40,000 runners participated in the event. [6]

The prize money for winners of the elite race was $55,000, with the total prize money awarded being $313,000. [7]

Course

The 2021 race was run on the traditional London Marathon course; the 2020 event was run on a special course around St James's Park as the race was held behind closed doors. [8] It was the first time that the race was run in October on the traditional course. [5]

The marathon distance is officially 42.195 kilometres (26.219 mi) long as sanctioned by World Athletics (IAAF). [9] The London Marathon is run over a mainly flat course, starting in Blackheath. [10] The course begins at three separate points and they converge just before 3 miles (4.8 km) into the race. [11] At just after 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) into the race, the runners reach the 19th-century clipper Cutty Sark docked in Greenwich [12] and at about halfway into the race, the runners cross Tower Bridge [13] before heading east into Shadwell and Canary Wharf. [10] After winding through Canary Wharf, the route returns through Shadwell on the other side of the road to which it entered before passing through Tower Hill. [13] The runners enter the underpass in Blackfriars before running along the Thames Embankment, past Westminster and onto Birdcage Walk. [13] [10] The course then runs parallel to St James's Park before turning onto The Mall and finishing in front of Buckingham Palace. [13] [10]

Competitors

Sisay Lemma won the elite men's race, and Joyciline Jepkosgei won the elite women's event. Sisay lemma joyciline jepkosgei for 2021 london marathon.jpg
Sisay Lemma won the elite men's race, and Joyciline Jepkosgei won the elite women's event.

In the elite men's race, 2020 race winner Shura Kitata competed, [14] [15] as did Vincent Kipchumba and Sisay Lemma, who finished second and third in the 2020 event. [14] Mosinet Geremew who finished second at the 2019 London Marathon, also competed. [14] Other competitors included Evans Chebet, who won the 2020 Valencia Marathon [14] and had the world leading marathon time in 2020, [15] and Birhanu Legese, who had previously won two Tokyo Marathons. [14] Seven competitors had a personal best time of under 2:05.00. Eliud Kipchoge, who had won the London Marathon on four occasions [8] and won the men's marathon event at the delayed 2020 Summer Olympics, was not on the race's entry list. [16] Briton Mo Farah did not compete due to a foot injury. [17] Ethiopian Kinde Atanaw tested positive for COVID-19 in the days leading up to the race. He did not race, and the other Ethiopian athletes had to minimise contact with other people. [18]

The elite women's race featured 2019 and 2020 race winner Brigid Kosgei, who came second in the women's marathon event at the delayed 2020 Summer Olympics. [14] [15] Other race favourites included Joyciline Jepkosgei, who won the 2019 New York City Marathon, Roza Dereje, who had the second best personal best time behind Kosgei [14] and Birhane Dibaba, who won the 2015 and 2018 Tokyo Marathons. [14] The race also contained Valary Jemeli, Zeineba Yimer and Tigist Girma, all of whom had personal best times under 2:20.00. [16] 44-year-old Australian Sinead Diver [15] and Allie Kieffer, who won the 2018 Toronto Half Marathon, also competed. [8]

The wheelchair men's race featured 2020 winner Brent Lakatos and 2019 winner Daniel Romanchuk. [19] Eight time former winner David Weir and twice champion Marcel Hug also raced. Hug won the men's marathon T54 at the 2020 Summer Paralympics, and it was Weir's 22nd consecutive appearance at the race. [20]

In the wheelchair women's race, 2020 winner Nikita den Boer competed. Course record holder and twice former winner Manuela Schär competed, as did Tatyana McFadden, who won four times between 2013 and 2016, 2018 champion Madison de Rozario, [19] and Susannah Scaroni, who was third in the 2017 and 2018 London Marathons. [5]

Race summary

Manuela Schar won the women's wheelchair race. Manuela Schar.jpg
Manuela Schär won the women's wheelchair race.
Marcel Hug won the men's wheelchair race. Marcel Hug - Paris 2014, cropped.jpg
Marcel Hug won the men's wheelchair race.

The men's and women's wheelchair races commenced at 08:50 BST (UTC+1), the elite women's event began at 09:00 BST and the elite men's race started at 09:30 BST. [5] The wheelchair and elite races were run in cool, dry conditions. [21]

The elite men's race was won by Ethiopian Sisay Lemma in a time of 02:04:01, [21] [22] the sixth fastest London Marathon time in history. [21] Kenyan Vincent Kipchumba and Ethiopian Mosinet Geremew finished second and third respectively. 2020 winner Shura Kitata finished sixth after struggling with a hamstring injury. [21] Shura had fallen behind the leading group within the first 5 kilometres (3.1 mi). [18] Philip Sesemann was the top finishing Briton in the race; he finished seventh overall. It was his first marathon event, [21] [22] and as a result, he qualified for the marathons events at the 2022 European Athletics Championships and 2022 Commonwealth Games. [23] After around 17 miles (27 km) of the race, Titus Ekiru withdrew. [18] Lemma slowed down to celebrate winning the race, and as a result, he missed out on a $25,000 bonus given to competitors who finished the race in under 02:04:00. Lemma was also unable to give post-race interviews, as he wasn't allowed to mix with new people due to Atanaw's positive COVID test. [18]

The elite women's race was won by Kenyan Joyciline Jepkosgei. [21] [22] Her winning time of 02:17:30 was the seventh fastest London Marathon time ever. [21] Jepkosgei took the lead 22 miles (35 km) into the race. 2020 winner Brigid Kosgei finished fourth overall; [21] she had fallen away from the leading group around 35 kilometres (22 mi) into the race. [24] The top three finishers were Jepkosgei, Degitu Azimeraw, and Ashete Bekere, all of whom had not competed at the 2020 Summer Olympics. [25] The top five finishers all recorded times faster than 02:19:00, the first time in marathon history that this had occurred. [24] [25] Charlotte Purdue was the top British finisher in the race; [21] she finished 10th overall in a personal best time of 02:23:26. [22] Her time was the third fastest marathon time by a British woman ever, and she missed out on the second fastest time, set by Mara Yamauchi, by 14 seconds. [24]

The men's wheelchair race was won by Swiss athlete Marcel Hug in a course record time of 01:26:27; [26] the previous record was set by Australian Kurt Fearnley in 2009. [27] It was Hug's third victory at the event. [26] Hug broke away from American Daniel Romanchuk after 13 miles (21 km) of the race, and maintained it to the end, [26] eventually winning by over three minutes. [28] Romanchuk finished second, and Briton David Weir finished third, beating Canadian Brent Lakatos in a sprint finish. [26]

The women's wheelchair race was won by Swiss athlete Manuela Schär in a course record time of 01:39:52; it was her third victory at the event, [26] [28] and she beat her own course record from 2017 by five seconds. [28] Schär broke away from the field after 5 miles (8.0 km) of the race, [26] and at the halfway point of the race, her lead was a minute and 52 seconds. Merle Menje and Tatyana McFadden finished second and third respectively, and were separated by a few thousands of a second. [28]

Non-elite events

A 2.6 kilometres (1.6 mi) mini-marathon for children between the ages of 11 and 17 began at 08:30 BST. [5] The mass-start in-person event commenced at 09:30 BST. [5] In order to reduce crowding on the course, the event used a staggered start of competitors, [4] in 40 separate groups over the course of 90 minutes. [5] The event did not have pacers to help competitors with their timings; pacers had been used every year for the London Marathon mass participation event since 2000. [29] In July 2021, the race organisers were criticised for refusing to allow a pregnant woman to defer her entry to the mass participation event until 2022. [30]

It was hoped that a record 50,000 people would run in the 2021 mass participation event. [31] [32] It was expected that an additional 50,000 runners would run a virtual marathon. [31] [33] Competitors had to use the official app to record their marathon at any time from 00:00 to 23:59 on 3 October. [34] In reality, around 80,000 people ran the event: about 40,000 in person, and about 40,000 ran virtually. [35] [36] Celebrity competitors included former England cricket captain Andrew Strauss, who ran to support his wife who died in 2018, former Health Secretary Matt Hancock, television presenters Chris Evans and Sophie Raworth. The youngest competitor in the race was 18 years and one day old, and the oldest runner was an 87-year-old from Japan. [36]

Results

Only the top 20 finishers in each race are listed.

Men

Elite men's top 20 finishers
PositionAthleteNationalityTime
Gold medal icon.svg Sisay Lemma Flag of Ethiopia.svg  Ethiopia 02:04:01
Silver medal icon.svg Vincent Kipchumba Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 02:04:28
Bronze medal icon.svg Mosinet Geremew Flag of Ethiopia.svg  Ethiopia 02:04:41
4 Evans Chebet Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 02:05:43
5 Birhanu Legese Flag of Ethiopia.svg  Ethiopia 02:06:10
6 Shura Kitata Flag of Ethiopia.svg  Ethiopia 02:07:51
7 Philip Sesemann Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 02:12:58
8 Josh Griffiths Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 02:13:39
9 Matthew Leach Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 02:15:31
10 Andrew Davies Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 02:15:36
11 Jonny Mellor Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 02:16:09
12 Weynay Ghebresilasie Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 02:16:27
13 Charlie Hulson Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 02:17:02
14 Josh Lunn Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 02:18:06
15 Mo Aaden Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 02:18:19
16 Nicholas Torry Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 02:18:39
17 Doug Musson Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 02:20:28
18 Jamie Crowe Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 02:22:48
19 Tristan Woodfine Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 02:23:35
20 Eoghan Totton Flag of Ireland.svg  Ireland 02:26:08

Source: [37]

Women

Elite women's top 20 finishers
PositionAthleteNationalityTime
Gold medal icon.svg Joyciline Jepkosgei Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 02:17:43
Silver medal icon.svg Degitu Azimeraw Flag of Ethiopia.svg  Ethiopia 02:17:58
Bronze medal icon.svg Ashete Bekere Flag of Ethiopia.svg  Ethiopia 02:18:18
4 Brigid Kosgei Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 02:18:40
5 Lonah Chemtai Salpeter Flag of Israel.svg  Israel 02:18:54
6 Valary Jemeli Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 02:20:35
7 Joan Melly Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 02:21:23
8 Zeineba Yimer Flag of Ethiopia.svg  Ethiopia 02:21:40
9 Tigist Girma Flag of Ethiopia.svg  Ethiopia 02:22:45
10 Charlotte Purdue Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 02:23:26
11 Birhane Dibaba Flag of Ethiopia.svg  Ethiopia 02:24:21
12 Sinead Diver Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 02:27:16
13 Alemu Megurtu Flag of Ethiopia.svg  Ethiopia 02:27:18
14 Eloise Wellings Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 02:29:42
15 Rose Harvey Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 02:29:45
16 Samantha Harrison Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 02:32:22
17 Natasha Cockram Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 02:32:32
18 Becky Briggs Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 02:34:34
19 Naomi Mitchell Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 02:38:06
20 Dylan Hassett Flag of Ireland.svg  Ireland 02:39:28

Source: [37]

Wheelchair men

Wheelchair men's top 20 finishers
PositionAthleteNationalityTime
Gold medal icon.svg Marcel Hug Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 01:26:27
Silver medal icon.svg Daniel Romanchuk Flag of the United States.svg  United States 01:29:27
Bronze medal icon.svg David Weir Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 01:31:34
4 Brent Lakatos Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 01:31:34
5 Aaron Pike Flag of the United States.svg  United States 01:31:36
6 Johnboy Smith Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 01:35:54
7 Sho Watanabe Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 01:35:55
8 Jordi Madera Jimenez Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 01:35:55
9 Kota Hokinoue Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 01:35:56
10 Hiroki Nishida Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 01:35:56
11 Patrick Monahan Flag of Ireland.svg  Ireland 01:35:58
12 Simon Lawson Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 01:36:00
13 Callum Hall Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 01:36:02
14 Sean Frame Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 01:37:18
15 James Senbeta Flag of the United States.svg  United States 01:41:11
16 Rafael Botello Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 01:42:02
17 Sam Kolek Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 01:42:02
18 Mark Millar Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 01:44:37
19 Michael McCabe Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 01:45:45
20 Bret Crossley Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 01:46:02

Source: [38]

Wheelchair women

Wheelchair women's finishers
PositionAthleteNationalityTime
Gold medal icon.svg Manuela Schär Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 01:39:52
Silver medal icon.svg Merle Menje Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 01:44:51
Bronze medal icon.svg Tatyana McFadden Flag of the United States.svg  United States 01:44:51
4 Nikita den Boer Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 01:44:54
5 Aline Rocha Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 01:50:07
6 Shelly Woods Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 01:50:11
7 Vanessa de Souza Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 01:50:13
8 Patricia Eachus Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 01:56:59
9 Jenna Fesemyer Flag of the United States.svg  United States 02:03:08
10 Margriet van den Broek Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 02:06:00
11 Michelle Wheeler Flag of the United States.svg  United States 02:06:02
12 Martyna Snopek Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 02:25:00
13 Elizabeth Mcternan Flag of the United States.svg  United States 02:43:01

Source: [38]

Notes

  1. The Tokyo Marathon, which is the sixth World Marathon Major, was postponed until 2022. [3]

Related Research Articles

London Marathon Annual race held in London, UK

The London Marathon is an annual marathon held in London, United Kingdom. Founded by athletes Chris Brasher and John Disley in 1981, it was typically held in April but has now moved to October. The largely flat course is set around the River Thames, starting in Blackheath and finishing at The Mall. Hugh Brasher is the current Race Director and Nick Bitel its Chief Executive.

The World Marathon Majors (WMM) is a championship-style competition for marathon runners that started in 2006. A points-based competition founded on six major marathon races recognised as the most high-profile on the calendar, the series comprises annual races for the cities of Tokyo, Boston, London, Berlin, Chicago and New York. In addition, each edition of the series recognises and includes the results of the major global championship marathon held in that year, usually on a one-off lapped course. These races are the biennial World Athletics Championships Marathon, and the quadrennial Olympic Games Marathon.

10K run

The 10K run is a long-distance road running competition over a distance of ten kilometres. Also referred to as the 10K road race, 10 km, or simply 10K, it is one of the most common types of road running event, alongside the shorter 5K and longer half marathon and marathon. It is usually distinguished from the 10,000 metres track running event by stating the distance in kilometres, rather than metres.

Mary Jepkosgei Keitany Kenyan long-distance runner

Mary Jepkosgei Keitany is a Kenyan former professional long distance runner. She is the world record holder in a women-only marathon, having won the 2017 London Marathon in a time of 2:17:01. As of November 2019, she sits third all-time at both the marathon and half marathon.

Prague Half Marathon

The Prague Half Marathon is an annual half marathon road running event which takes place in Spring on the city streets of Prague, Czech Republic, first held in 1999. It is managed by the same organisation that holds the Prague Marathon in May. The race has a loop course, starting and ending in Jan Palach Square near the Rudolfinum, and largely follows the Vltava river. The competition has enjoyed an increasing level of participation, with around 6500 participants in 2009 and almost 8500 runners taking part in the 2010 event.

Sisay Lemma Ethiopian long-distance runner

Sisay Lemma Kasaye is an Ethiopian long-distance runner.

2016 London Marathon

The 2016 London Marathon was the 36th running of the annual marathon race in London, England, which took place on Sunday, 24 April. The men's elite race was won by Kenyan Eliud Kipchoge and the women's race was won by Kenyan Jemima Sumgong. The men's wheelchair race was won by Marcel Hug from Switzerland and the women's wheelchair race was won by American Tatyana McFadden.

2017 London Marathon

The 2017 London Marathon was the 37th running of the annual marathon race in London, England, which took place on Sunday, 23 April. Mary Jepkosgei Keitany won the women's race, setting a new women-only marathon world record with a time of 2:17:01, while Daniel Wanjiru came first in the men's race in 2:05:48. David Weir claimed a record breaking seventh win at the London Marathon in the men's wheelchair event. The win broke a tie between Weir and Tanni Gray Thompson for the most wins at the London Marathon.

Joyciline Jepkosgei Kenyan long-distance runner

Joyciline Jepkosgei is a Kenyan female long-distance runner who competes over distances from 10,000 metres to the marathon. She is the current half marathon world record holder in contests with mixed-gender fields with her personal best of 64:51 minutes, and additionally the record holder in the 10 km with 29:43 minutes. She was a bronze medallist over 10,000 m at the African Championships in Athletics in 2016. Jepkosgei ran a pending world record for the half marathon of 1:04:52 at the Sportisimo Prague Half Marathon in April 2017, becoming the first woman ever to break 65 minutes. She also unofficially broke the IAAF-ratified records for 10 km, 15 km and 20 km along the way, breaking a total of four world records in a single event. She also became the first Kenyan ever to break six world records in six months.

The 2018 New York City Marathon was a marathon race held in New York City, United States, which took place on November 4, 2018. It was the 48th edition of the New York City Marathon, which is organised by New York Road Runners. The men's race was won by Lelisa Desisa, who held off a late challenge at the finish by Shura Kitata. The women's race was won by Mary Keitany, her fourth win of the event. Both Desisa and Keitany recorded the second fastest times on the course. In the wheelchair races, Daniel Romanchuk (1:36:21) and Switzerland's Manuela Schär (1:50:27) won the men's and women's races, respectively. A total of 52,704 runners finished the race, comprising 30,592 men and 22,112 women.

Brigid Kosgei Kenyan long-distance runner

Brigid Jepchirchir Kosgei is a Kenyan marathon runner who won the 2018 and 2019 Chicago Marathons and the 2019 and 2020 London Marathons. She is the current marathon world record holder for women running in a mixed-sex race, with a time of 2:14:04 achieved on 13 October 2019 at the Chicago Marathon. This beat the previous world record set 16 years before by 1 minute 24 seconds, and the women's Chicago Marathon record by 3 minutes and 14 seconds.

2019 Boston Marathon 2019 running of the Boston Marathon

The 2019 Boston Marathon was the 123rd running of the annual marathon race held in Boston, Massachusetts. It took place on April 15, 2019. The elite men's race came down to a sprint finish, which Lawrence Cherono won in 2:07:57. The elite women's race was won by Worknesh Degefa, who took an early lead and built up a large gap between herself and the other runners, in 2:23:31. The men's and women's wheelchair races were won by Daniel Romanchuk in 1:21:36 and Manuela Schär in 1:34:19, respectively.

2019 London Marathon 39th running of the London marathon

The 2019 London Marathon was the 39th running of the annual marathon race in London, United Kingdom, which took place on 28 April. The elite men's race was won by Kenyan Eliud Kipchoge, who took his fourth London Marathon victory in a time of 2:02:37, the second fastest marathon ever at that point. The women's race was won by Brigid Kosgei, also of Kenya, in 2:18:20. American Daniel Romanchuk won the men's wheelchair title in 1:33:38 while Switzerland's Manuela Schär won the women's title in 1:44:09. Changes were made to the course to make it more environmentally friendly; the number of plastic bottles used was reduced and biodegradable alternatives were used instead.

The 2019 Chicago Marathon was the 42nd annual running of the Chicago Marathon held in Chicago, Illinois, United States on October 13, 2019. The men's race was won by Kenyan Lawrence Cherono in 2:05:45 while the women's was won by Kenyan Brigid Kosgei in 2:14:04, a world record by 81 seconds. The men's and women's wheelchair races were won by Daniel Romanchuk and Manuela Schär in 1:30:26 and 1:41:08, respectively. More than 45,000 runners completed the race.

2019 Berlin Marathon Running race in 2019

The 2019 Berlin Marathon was a marathon race held on 29 September 2019 in Berlin, Germany. It was the 46th edition of the annual Berlin Marathon. The marathon distance is just over 26 miles (42 km) in length and the course is run around the city and starts and finishes in the Tiergarten. The elite men's race was won by Kenenisa Bekele in 2:01:41, two seconds slower than the world record set by Eliud Kipchoge in 2018. The elite women's race was won by Ashete Bekere following a sprint finish in 2:20:14. The wheelchair men's and women's races were won by Marcel Hug and Manuela Schär in 1:28:09 and 1:38:07, respectively.

2019 New York City Marathon 49th running of the marathon

The 2019 New York City Marathon was the 49th running of the annual marathon race held in New York City, United States, which took place on November 3, 2019. The men's race was won by Kenyan Geoffrey Kamworor in a time of 2:08:13. The women's race was won in 2:22:38 by Kenyan Joyciline Jepkosgei, making her official debut at the distance. The men and women's wheelchair races, were won by American Daniel Romanchuk (1:37:24) and Switzerland's Manuela Schär (1:44:20), respectively. A total of 53,508 runners finished the race, comprising 30,794 men and 22,714 women.

2020 London Marathon 40th annual marathon race in London

The 2020 London Marathon was the 40th running of the annual marathon race in London, United Kingdom, which took place on 4 October 2020. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the race was postponed from 26 April and only allowed elite participants; the mass participation event was cancelled. The event used a different course from usual, consisting of multiple laps around St James's Park.

The 2021 New York City Marathon will be the 50th running of the annual marathon race held in New York City, United States, which is scheduled to take place on November 7, 2021. The number of competitors has been limited to 33,000 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

2021 Boston Marathon 2021 running of the Boston Marathon

The 2021 Boston Marathon was the 125th running of the annual marathon race held in Boston, Massachusetts. It took place on October 11, 2021.

References

  1. "London Marathon: 2020 edition to be elite-only race, with mass event cancelled". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 4 October 2020.
  2. "A look at the tightly packed fall marathon schedule". Running Magazine. 31 January 2021. Archived from the original on 12 August 2021. Retrieved 12 August 2021.
  3. "The 2021 Tokyo Marathon Has Been Postponed From October to March". Runner's World . 17 September 2021. Archived from the original on 21 September 2021. Retrieved 20 September 2021.
  4. 1 2 "London Marathon: Hugh Brasher expects most memorable race ever". BBC Sport . 28 September 2021. Archived from the original on 28 September 2021. Retrieved 28 September 2021.
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 "Virgin Money London Marathon: who, what and when?". Athletics Weekly . 28 September 2021. Archived from the original on 28 September 2021. Retrieved 29 September 2021.
  6. "Lemma wins London Marathon, off podium as COVID precaution". AP NEWS. 3 October 2021. Retrieved 6 October 2021.
  7. "Everything You Need to Know About the 2021 London Marathon". Runner's World . 29 September 2021. Archived from the original on 30 September 2021. Retrieved 30 September 2021.
  8. 1 2 3 "2021 Virgin Money London Marathon elite field announcement". Running Magazine. 12 August 2021. Archived from the original on 12 August 2021. Retrieved 12 August 2021.
  9. "IAAF Competition Rules for Road Races". International Association of Athletics Federations. 2009. Archived from the original on 23 September 2015.
  10. 1 2 3 4 Hughes, David (28 April 2019). "London Marathon 2019 route: map, road closures, start times and where to watch". inews.co.uk. Archived from the original on 12 August 2021. Retrieved 15 February 2021.
  11. "London Marathon 2021 route that runners will take – See every mile". Wimbledon Times. 3 October 2021. Retrieved 4 October 2021.
  12. "History of Cutty Sark". rmg.co.uk. Archived from the original on 11 February 2021. Retrieved 16 February 2021.
  13. 1 2 3 4 Harris-Fry, Nick (25 April 2019). "The Runner's Guide To The London Marathon Route". coachmag.co.uk. Archived from the original on 27 April 2019. Retrieved 30 January 2021.
  14. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 "World record-holder Brigid Kosgei headlines 2021 Virgin Money London Marathon". Athletics Weekly . 12 August 2021. Archived from the original on 12 August 2021. Retrieved 12 August 2021.
  15. 1 2 3 4 "Brigid Kosgei to defend London Marathon title on 3 October". BBC Sport . 12 August 2021. Archived from the original on 12 August 2021. Retrieved 12 August 2021.
  16. 1 2 "No Eliud Kipchoge As London Marathon Release List Of Elite Athletes". Capital Sports . 12 August 2021. Archived from the original on 12 August 2021. Retrieved 12 August 2021.
  17. "No Eliud Kipchoge or Mo Farah leaves opportunity for lesser light to become lead man at London Marathon". Evening Standard . 1 October 2021. Archived from the original on 1 October 2021. Retrieved 3 October 2021.
  18. 1 2 3 4 "Lemma victorious as Sesemann nails marathon debut". Athletics Weekly . 3 October 2021. Retrieved 3 October 2021.
  19. 1 2 "Brent Lakatos and Nikita den Boer to defend London Marathon titles". Athletics Weekly . 13 August 2021. Archived from the original on 13 August 2021. Retrieved 13 August 2021.
  20. "David Weir "proud" ahead of his 22nd consecutive London Marathon". Athletics Weekly . 30 September 2021. Archived from the original on 30 September 2021. Retrieved 1 October 2021.
  21. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 "London Marathon 2021: Jepkosgei and Lemma win London Marathon titles in rapid times". BBC Sport . 3 October 2021. Retrieved 3 October 2021.
  22. 1 2 3 4 "London Marathon 2021: Joyciline Jepkosgei wins the women's race as Sisay Lemma wins the men's — live updates". The Daily Telegraph . 3 October 2021. Retrieved 3 October 2021.
  23. "London Marathon 2021: Junior doctor Phil Sesemann first British male to finish". BBC Sport . 3 October 2021. Retrieved 3 October 2021.
  24. 1 2 3 "Joy for Jepkosgei as Purdue proves a point". Athletics Weekly . 3 October 2021. Retrieved 3 October 2021.
  25. 1 2 "Joyciline Jepkosgei Shone Brightest of All in London, Winning the 2021 Marathon". Runner's World . 3 October 2021. Retrieved 4 October 2021.
  26. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "London Marathon 2021: Marcel Hug & Manuela Schar win wheelchair titles in record times". BBC Sport . 3 October 2021. Archived from the original on 3 October 2021. Retrieved 3 October 2021.
  27. https://archive.is/20211003090456/https://www.virginmoneylondonmarathon.com/results/history-of-the-london-marathon
  28. 1 2 3 4 "Manuela Schär and Marcel Hug break course records at London Marathon". Athletics Weekly . 3 October 2021. Retrieved 3 October 2021.
  29. "The London Marathon 2021 won't feature any RW Pacers". Runner's World . 26 August 2021. Archived from the original on 26 August 2021. Retrieved 26 August 2021.
  30. "London Marathon criticised for pregnancy deferral policy" . The Daily Telegraph . 1 July 2021. Archived from the original on 5 July 2021. Retrieved 6 July 2021.
  31. 1 2 "London Marathon to feature 100,000 runners in virtual and in-person event". Running Magazine. 21 January 2021. Archived from the original on 12 August 2021. Retrieved 12 August 2021.
  32. "London Marathon organisers 'optimistic' 2021 race will have record 50,000 runners". BBC Sport . 21 January 2021. Archived from the original on 21 January 2021. Retrieved 21 January 2021.
  33. "London Marathon organisers hope to set world record for runners in 2021". The Guardian . 21 January 2021. Archived from the original on 12 February 2021. Retrieved 12 February 2021.
  34. "When is the London Marathon 2021? Date, start times, route map, virtual race guide and elite runners list". i . 1 October 2021. Archived from the original on 1 October 2021. Retrieved 1 October 2021.
  35. "London Marathon 2021: Race attracts 80,000 participants". BBC News . 3 October 2021. Retrieved 4 October 2021.
  36. 1 2 "London Marathon: 80,000 runners take part in 'moment of joy' as race returns from two-year Covid gap". The Independent . 3 October 2021. Retrieved 4 October 2021.
  37. 1 2 "Leaderboard: Elite". London Marathon . Retrieved 3 October 2021.
  38. 1 2 "Leaderboard: Wheelchair T53/T54". London Marathon . Retrieved 3 October 2021.