320

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
320 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 320
CCCXX
Ab urbe condita 1073
Assyrian calendar 5070
Balinese saka calendar 241–242
Bengali calendar −273
Berber calendar 1270
Buddhist calendar 864
Burmese calendar −318
Byzantine calendar 5828–5829
Chinese calendar 己卯(Earth  Rabbit)
3016 or 2956
     to 
庚辰年 (Metal  Dragon)
3017 or 2957
Coptic calendar 36–37
Discordian calendar 1486
Ethiopian calendar 312–313
Hebrew calendar 4080–4081
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 376–377
 - Shaka Samvat 241–242
 - Kali Yuga 3420–3421
Holocene calendar 10320
Iranian calendar 302 BP – 301 BP
Islamic calendar 311 BH – 310 BH
Javanese calendar 201–202
Julian calendar 320
CCCXX
Korean calendar 2653
Minguo calendar 1592 before ROC
民前1592年
Nanakshahi calendar −1148
Seleucid era 631/632 AG
Thai solar calendar 862–863
Tibetan calendar 阴土兔年
(female Earth-Rabbit)
446 or 65 or −707
     to 
阳金龙年
(male Iron-Dragon)
447 or 66 or −706
The Nydam oak boat at Gottorf Castle, Schleswig, (Germany) Nydamboat.2.jpg
The Nydam oak boat at Gottorf Castle, Schleswig, (Germany)

Year 320 ( CCCXX ) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Constantinus and Constantinus (or, less frequently, year 1073 Ab urbe condita ). The denomination 320 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

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40 Martyrs of Sebaste FortyMartyrsofSebaste.JPG
40 Martyrs of Sebaste
Saint Illuminata Chiesa di San Salvatore di Canzano - Sant'Illuminata di Todi.jpg
Saint Illuminata
Saint Proculus of Verona Sebastiano Ricci 042.jpg
Saint Proculus of Verona

Date Unknown

Related Research Articles

The 300s decade ran from January 1, 300, to December 31, 309.

The 310s decade ran from January 1, 310, to December 31, 319.

The 320s decade ran from January 1, 320, to December 31, 329.

321 Calendar year

Year 321 (CCCXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Crispus and Constantinus. The denomination 321 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

The 180s decade ran from January 1, 180, to December 31, 189.

313 Calendar year

Year 313 (CCCXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Constantinus and Licinianus. The denomination 313 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years. This year is notable for ending of the persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire.

376 Calendar year

Year 376 (CCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Valens and Augustus. The denomination 376 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

The 360s decade ran from January 1, 360, to December 31, 369.

The 330s decade ran from January 1, 330, to December 31, 339.

The 340s decade ran from January 1, 340, to December 31, 349.

The 290s decade ran from January 1, 290, to December 31, 299.

The 280s decade ran from January 1, 280, to December 31, 289.

Year 362 (CCCLXII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Mamertinus and Nevitta. The denomination 362 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

350 Calendar year

Year 350 (CCCL) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Sergius and Nigrinianus. The denomination 350 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Year 344 (CCCXLIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Leontius and Bonosus. The denomination 344 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

335 year

Year 335 (CCCXXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Constantius and Albinus. The denomination 335 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

316 Calendar year

Year 316 (CCCXVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Sabinus and Rufinus. The denomination 316 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Zhang Mao, courtesy name Chengxun (成遜), formally Prince Chenglie of (Former) Liang ( 涼成烈王) or Duke Cheng of Xiping (西平成公) was a ruler and the commonly accepted first ruler of the Chinese state Former Liang. During the brief reign of his grandnephew Zhang Zuo, he was honored as Prince Cheng of Liang (涼成王).

Zhang Jun, courtesy name Gongting (公庭), formally Duke Zhongcheng of Xiping or Duke Wen of Xiping was a ruler of the Chinese state Former Liang. During his reign, he at times used the Jin-created title of Duke of Xiping, but when forced to submit to Han Zhao and Later Zhao, he used the title Prince of Liang. Late in his reign, even when not under Later Zhao's pressure, he claimed the title of "Acting Prince of Liang." During the brief reign of his son Zhang Zuo, he was honored as Prince Wen of Liang (涼文王). The Book of Jin describes Zhang Jun as having an extraordinary appearance and was talented at literature, however he was also an extravagant and dissipated man.

Zhang Shi was the regional warlord and ruler in the Former Liang state. He was the eldest son of Zhang Gui, who was a governor of Liang province under the Jin Dynasty. In 314, Zhang Shi inherited the title Duke of Xiping as well as the governorship of Liang from his father. He was also honored as Prince Ming of Former Liang

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