806

Last updated

Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
806 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 806
DCCCVI
Ab urbe condita 1559
Armenian calendar 255
ԹՎ ՄԾԵ
Assyrian calendar 5556
Balinese saka calendar 727–728
Bengali calendar 213
Berber calendar 1756
Buddhist calendar 1350
Burmese calendar 168
Byzantine calendar 6314–6315
Chinese calendar 乙酉(Wood  Rooster)
3502 or 3442
     to 
丙戌年 (Fire  Dog)
3503 or 3443
Coptic calendar 522–523
Discordian calendar 1972
Ethiopian calendar 798–799
Hebrew calendar 4566–4567
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 862–863
 - Shaka Samvat 727–728
 - Kali Yuga 3906–3907
Holocene calendar 10806
Iranian calendar 184–185
Islamic calendar 190–191
Japanese calendar Enryaku 25 / Daidō 1
(大同元年)
Javanese calendar 701–703
Julian calendar 806
DCCCVI
Korean calendar 3139
Minguo calendar 1106 before ROC
民前1106年
Nanakshahi calendar −662
Seleucid era 1117/1118 AG
Thai solar calendar 1348–1349
Tibetan calendar 阴木鸡年
(female Wood-Rooster)
932 or 551 or −221
     to 
阳火狗年
(male Fire-Dog)
933 or 552 or −220
The church (oratory) in Germigny-des-Pres Germigny Des Pres 2007 02.jpg
The church (oratory) in Germigny-des-Prés

Year 806 ( DCCCVI ) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Thursday is any non-leap year that begins on Thursday, 1 January, and ends on Thursday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is D. The most recent year of such kind was 2015 and the next one will be 2026 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2010 and 2021 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. This common year contains the most Friday the 13ths; specifically, the months of February, March, and November. Leap years starting on Sunday share this characteristic. From February until March in this type of year is also the shortest period that occurs within a Friday the 13th.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

By place

Asia

February 5 is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 329 days remaining until the end of the year.

Emperor Kanmu Emperor of Japan

Emperor Kanmu was the 50th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. Kanmu reigned from 781 to 806.

Culture of Korea The shared cultural and historical heritage of Korea and southern Manchuria

The culture of Korea is the shared cultural and historical heritage of Korea and southern Manchuria. As one of the oldest continuous cultures in the world, Koreans have passed down their traditional narratives in a variety of ways. Since the mid-20th century, Korea has been split between the North and South Korean states, resulting today in a number of cultural differences. Before the Joseon Dynasty, the practice of Korean shamanism was deeply rooted in Korean culture.

Abbasid Caliphate

Arab–Byzantine wars series of wars between the 7th and 11th centuries

The Arab–Byzantine wars were a series of wars between the mostly Arab Muslims and the Byzantine Empire between the 7th and 11th centuries AD, started during the initial Muslim conquests under the expansionist Rashidun and Umayyad caliphs in the 7th century and continued by their successors until the mid-11th century.

Harun al-Rashid The Fifth Abbasid Caliph

Harun al-Rashid was the fifth Abbasid Caliph. His birth date is debated, with various sources giving dates from 763 to 766. His epithet "al-Rashid" translates to "the Orthodox," "the Just," "the Upright," or "the Rightly-Guided." Al-Rashid ruled from 786 to 809, during the peak of the Islamic Golden Age. He established the legendary library Bayt al-Hikma in Baghdad in present-day Iraq, and during his rule Baghdad began to flourish as a center of knowledge, culture and trade. During his rule, the family of Barmakids, which played a deciding role in establishing the Abbasid Caliphate, declined gradually. In 796, he moved his court and government to Raqqa in present-day Syria.

Abbasid invasion of Asia Minor (806)

The Abbasid invasion of Asia Minor in 806 was the largest operation ever launched by the Abbasid Caliphate against the Byzantine Empire. The expedition was commanded in person by the Abbasid Caliph Harun al-Rashid, who wished to retaliate for the Byzantine successes in the Caliphate's frontier region in the previous year and impress Abbasid might upon the Byzantine emperor, Nikephoros I. The huge Abbasid army, according to Arab sources numbering more than 135,000 men, raided across Cappadocia unopposed, capturing several towns and fortresses, most notably Herakleia, and forcing Nikephoros to seek peace in exchange for tribute. Following Harun's departure, however, Nikephoros violated the terms of the treaty and reoccupied the frontier forts he had been forced to abandon. Harun's preoccupation with a rebellion in Khurasan, and his death three years later, prohibited a reprisal on a similar scale. Moreover, the Abbasid civil war that began after 809 and the Byzantine preoccupation with the Bulgars contributed to a cessation of large-scale Arab–Byzantine conflict for two decades.

Britain

Vikings Norse explorers, warriors, merchants, and pirates

Vikings were Norse seafarers, mainly speaking the Old Norse language, who during the late 8th to late 11th centuries, raided and traded from their Northern European homelands across wide areas of Europe, and explored westwards to Iceland, Greenland, and Vinland. The term is also commonly extended in modern English and other vernaculars to the inhabitants of Norse home communities during what has become known as the Viking Age. This period of Nordic military, mercantile and demographic expansion constitutes an important element in the early medieval history of Scandinavia, Estonia, the British Isles, France, Kievan Rus' and Sicily.

Columba Gaelic Irish missionary monk

Saint Columba was an Irish abbot and missionary Evangelist credited with spreading Christianity in what is today Scotland at the start of the Hiberno-Scottish mission. He founded the important abbey on Iona, which became a dominant religious and political institution in the region for centuries. He is the Patron Saint of Derry. He was highly regarded by both the Gaels of Dál Riata and the Picts, and is remembered today as a Catholic saint and one of the Twelve Apostles of Ireland.

Iona island off the west coast of Scotland

Iona is a small island in the Inner Hebrides off the Ross of Mull on the western coast of Scotland. It is mainly known for Iona Abbey, though there are other buildings on the island. Iona Abbey was a centre of Gaelic monasticism for three centuries and is today known for its relative tranquility and natural environment. It is a tourist destination and a place for spiritual retreats. Its modern Gaelic name means "Iona of (Saint) Columba".

Europe

Al-Hakam I Emir of Cordoba

Al-Hakam Ibn Hisham Ibn Abd-ar-Rahman I was Umayyad Emir of Cordoba from 796 until 822 in the Al-Andalus.

Emirate of Córdoba independent emirate in the Iberian Peninsula (756-929)

The Emirate of Córdoba was an independent emirate in the Iberian Peninsula ruled by the Umayyad dynasty with Córdoba as its capital.

Toledo, Spain City in Castile–La Mancha, Spain

Toledo is a city and municipality located in central Spain; it is the capital of the province of Toledo and the autonomous community of Castile–La Mancha. Toledo was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1986 for its extensive monumental and cultural heritage.

By topic

Religion

April 12 is the 102nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 263 days remaining until the end of the year.

Nikephoros I of Constantinople Patriarch of Constantinople

St. Nikephoros I or Nicephorus I was a Christian Byzantine writer and Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople from April 12, 806, to March 13, 815.

Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople position

The Ecumenical Patriarch is the Archbishop of Constantinople–New Rome and ranks as primus inter pares among the heads of the several autocephalous churches that make up the Eastern Orthodox Church. The term Ecumenical in the title is a historical reference to the Ecumene, a Greek designation for the civilised world, i.e. the Roman Empire, and it stems from Canon 28 of the Council of Chalcedon.

Births

Deaths

Related Research Articles

8th century Century

The 8th century is the period from 701 to 800 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Common Era. The coast of North Africa and the Iberian Peninsula quickly come under Islamic Arab domination. The westward expansion of the Umayyad Empire was famously halted at the Siege of Constantinople by the Byzantine Empire and the Battle of Tours by the Franks. The tide of Arab conquest came to an end in the middle of the 8th century.

The 800s decade ran from January 1, 800, to December 31, 809.

Year 800 (DCCC) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. It was around this time that the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years, so from this time on, the years began to be known as 800 and onwards.

The 810s decade ran from January 1, 810, to December 31, 819.

The 780s decade ran from January 1, 780, to December 31, 789.

817 Year

Year 817 (DCCCXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

810 Year

Year 810 (DCCCX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

809 Year

Year 809 (DCCCIX) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

807 Year

Year 807 (DCCCVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

803 Year

Year 803 (DCCCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

802 Year

Year 802 (DCCCII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

782 Year

Year 782 (DCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 782 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

785 Year

Year 785 (DCCLXXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. The article denomination 785 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years. It is still used today in this manner.

788 Year

Year 788 (DCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 788 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

789 Year

Year 789 (DCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 789 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

813 Year

Year 813 (DCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

830 Year

Year 830 (DCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

895 Year

Year 895 (DCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Battle of Krasos battle in the Arab–Byzantine Wars

The Battle of Krasos was a battle in the Arab–Byzantine Wars that took place in August 804, between the Byzantines under Emperor Nikephoros I and an Abbasid army under Ibrahim ibn Jibril. Nikephoros' accession in 802 resulted in a resumption of warfare between Byzantium and the Abbasid Caliphate. In late summer 804, the Abbasids had invaded Byzantine Asia Minor for one of their customary raids, and Nikephoros set out to meet them. He was surprised, however, at Krasos and heavily defeated, barely escaping with his own life. A truce and prisoner exchange were afterwards arranged. Despite his defeat, and a massive Abbasid invasion the next year, Nikephoros persevered until troubles in the eastern provinces of the Caliphate forced the Abbasids to conclude a peace.

References

  1. Emperor Heizei, Yamamomo Imperial Mausoleum, Imperial Household Agency
  2. Mango & Scott 1997 , pp. 661–662.
  3. Treadgold 1988, p. 145.
  4. Treadgold 1988, pp. 144–145.
  5. Laurent 1919, p. 99.
  6. Whittow 1996, p. 214.
  7. Rucquoi, Adeline (1993). Histoire médiévale de la Péninsule ibérique. Paris: Seuil. p. 85. ISBN   2-02-012935-3.
  8. Brooks, N. P. (2004). "Wulfred (d. 832)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/30095 . Retrieved 7 November 2007.(subscription or UK public library membership required)

Sources