Adams hemisphere-in-a-square projection

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Adams hemisphere-in-a-square projection. 15deg graticule. Adams hemisphere in a square.JPG
Adams hemisphere-in-a-square projection. 15° graticule.
The Adams doubly periodic projection with Tissot's indicatrix of deformation. Adams Doubly-Periodic with Tissot's Indicatrices of Distortion.svg
The Adams doubly periodic projection with Tissot's indicatrix of deformation.

The Adams hemisphere-in-a-square is a conformal map projection for a hemisphere. It is a transverse version of the Peirce quincuncial projection, and is named after American cartographer Oscar Sherman Adams, who published it in 1925. [1] When it is used to represent the entire sphere it is known as the Adams doubly periodic projection. Like many conformal projections, conformality fails at certain points, in this case at the four corners.

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References

  1. Fenna, Donald (2006), Cartographic Science: A Compendium of Map Projections, with Derivations, CRC Press, p. 357, ISBN   9780849381690 .