Buxton, North Carolina

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Buxton, North Carolina
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Location in Dare County and the state of North Carolina.
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Buxton
Location in North Carolina and the United States
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Buxton
Buxton (the United States)
Coordinates: 35°16′4″N75°32′33″W / 35.26778°N 75.54250°W / 35.26778; -75.54250 Coordinates: 35°16′4″N75°32′33″W / 35.26778°N 75.54250°W / 35.26778; -75.54250
Country United States of America
State North Carolina
County Dare
Named for Ralph P. Buxton [1]
Area
  Total2.98 sq mi (7.73 km2)
  Land2.96 sq mi (7.67 km2)
  Water0.02 sq mi (0.06 km2)
Elevation
11 ft (3 m)
Population
 (2010)
  Total1,273
  Density430/sq mi (166.0/km2)
ZIP code
27920

Buxton is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) on Hatteras Island (part of the Outer Banks) near Cape Hatteras. It is located in Dare County in the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of the 2010 census, it had a population of 1,273. [2] Located at the widest part of Hatteras Island, it is the largest community on Hatteras Island both in terms of area and population, and is home to the island's schools and other major public buildings and offices.

Contents

North Carolina Highway 12 links the community to other Outer Banks communities such as Avon, Frisco, and Hatteras. Buxton is most famous for being the location of Cape Hatteras Light and of the accompanied beaches; it is also the home of the Cape Hatteras Anglers Club.

The residents of Buxton are governed by the Dare County Board of Commissioners. Buxton is part of District 4, along with Avon, Frisco, Hatteras, Rodanthe, Waves and Salvo.

In addition to Cape Hatteras Light, the SS Lancing shipwreck was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2013. [3]

Recreation

A view of the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse from the beach HatterasLighthousefromBeachJune2007.JPG
A view of the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse from the beach

Watersports are common on both the Pamlico Sound side and the Atlantic Ocean side of the community. Proximity to the convergence of the Labrador Current and the Gulf Stream result in the largest surf available [ citation needed ] on the East Coast. On the protected soundside of the island, watersports such as windsurfing, kayaking, kiteboarding, and swimming are all readily available and accessible.

Education

Construction of the new Cape Hatteras Secondary School HatterasSchoolJune2007.JPG
Construction of the new Cape Hatteras Secondary School

Residents are served by the new Cape Hatteras Elementary School, opened in 2001 (home of the Tropical Storms) and Cape Hatteras Secondary School of Coastal Studies, a combination middle school and high school (Home of the Hurricanes) newly rebuilt in 2007 on the NC 12 site of the original Cape Hatteras Elementary and Cape Hatteras Secondary Schools, in Buxton. [4] Both schools are part of the Dare County Schools district. [5]

British Cemetery

On May 21, 1942, the body of a British seaman, unidentifiable but presumed to be from the HMT Bedfordshire, sunk by a German U-boat, washed ashore. The month prior, a British sailor from the sunken merchant ship San Delfino had been buried in Buxton. The Bedfordshire seaman was interred in an adjacent plot, resulting in a British Cemetery, formally known as Cape Hatteras Coast Guard Burial Ground. [6]

Climate

According to the Trewartha climate classification system, Buxton, North Carolina has a humid subtropical climate with hot and humid summers, cool winters and year-around precipitation (Cfak). Cfak climates are characterized by all months having an average mean temperature > 32.0 °F (> 0.0 °C), at least eight months with an average mean temperature ≥ 50.0 °F (≥ 10.0 °C), at least one month with an average mean temperature ≥ 71.6 °F (≥ 22.0 °C) and no significant precipitation difference between seasons. During the summer months in Buxton, a cooling afternoon sea breeze is present on most days, but episodes of extreme heat and humidity can occur with heat index values ≥ 100 °F (≥ 38 °C). Buxton is prone to hurricane strikes, particularly during the Atlantic hurricane season which extends from June 1 through November 30, sharply peaking from late August through September. During the winter months, episodes of cold and wind can occur with wind chill values < 15 °F (< -9 °C). The plant hardiness zone in Buxton is 8b with an average annual extreme minimum air temperature of 19.3 °F (-7.1 °C). [7] The average seasonal (Dec-Mar) snowfall total is < 2 inches (< 5 cm), and the average annual peak in nor'easter activity is in February.

Climate data for Buxton, NC (1981-2010 Averages)
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Average high °F (°C)52.6
(11.4)
54.1
(12.3)
59.1
(15.1)
66.5
(19.2)
73.6
(23.1)
80.9
(27.2)
84.5
(29.2)
84.0
(28.9)
80.3
(26.8)
72.4
(22.4)
64.4
(18.0)
56.5
(13.6)
69.1
(20.6)
Daily mean °F (°C)45.8
(7.7)
47.2
(8.4)
52.1
(11.2)
59.8
(15.4)
67.5
(19.7)
75.4
(24.1)
79.3
(26.3)
78.9
(26.1)
75.0
(23.9)
66.5
(19.2)
58.1
(14.5)
49.9
(9.9)
63.0
(17.2)
Average low °F (°C)39.0
(3.9)
40.3
(4.6)
45.1
(7.3)
53.1
(11.7)
61.3
(16.3)
70.0
(21.1)
74.2
(23.4)
73.8
(23.2)
69.7
(20.9)
60.7
(15.9)
51.9
(11.1)
43.3
(6.3)
56.9
(13.8)
Average precipitation inches (mm)5.11
(130)
3.90
(99)
4.63
(118)
3.80
(97)
3.63
(92)
4.01
(102)
4.89
(124)
6.75
(171)
6.26
(159)
5.07
(129)
4.77
(121)
4.15
(105)
56.97
(1,447)
Average relative humidity (%)72.071.370.070.573.477.078.977.675.271.873.671.973.6
Average dew point °F (°C)37.3
(2.9)
38.4
(3.6)
42.6
(5.9)
50.2
(10.1)
58.7
(14.8)
67.7
(19.8)
72.2
(22.3)
71.3
(21.8)
66.6
(19.2)
57.1
(13.9)
49.7
(9.8)
41.2
(5.1)
54.5
(12.5)
Source: PRISM [8]
Climate data for Cape Hatteras, NC Ocean Water Temperature (6 S Buxton)
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Daily mean °F (°C)49
(9)
46
(8)
52
(11)
59
(15)
68
(20)
74
(23)
78
(26)
80
(27)
77
(25)
70
(21)
58
(14)
55
(13)
64
(18)
Source: NOAA [9]

Ecology

According to the A. W. Kuchler U.S. potential natural vegetation types, Buxton, North Carolina would have a dominant vegetation type of Live oak/Sea Oats Uniola paniculata (90) with a dominant vegetation form of Coastal Prairie (20). [10]

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Avon, North Carolina Census-designated place in North Carolina, United States

Avon is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) in Dare County in the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of the 2010 census, it had a permanent population of 776.

Corolla, North Carolina

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Rodanthe, North Carolina Census-designated place in North Carolina, United States

Rodanthe is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) located in Dare County, North Carolina, United States, on Hatteras Island, part of North Carolina's Outer Banks. As of the 2010 census it had a population of 261. Rodanthe, along with Waves and Salvo, are part of the settlement of Chicamacomico. Rodanthe includes the original Chicamacomico Life-Saving Station, decommissioned in 1954, but now a museum.

Waves, North Carolina Census-designated place in North Carolina, United States

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Salvo, North Carolina Census-designated place in North Carolina, United States

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Hatteras Island

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Frisco, North Carolina Census-designated place in North Carolina, United States of America

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Cape Hatteras National Seashore

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Cape Lookout (North Carolina)

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Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge

Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge is a national wildlife refuge located on North Carolina's Pea Island, a coastal barrier island and part of a chain of islands known as the Outer Banks, adjacent to Cape Hatteras National Seashore. The sanctuary is located 10 miles (16 km) south of Nags Head, North Carolina on NC 12.

Carova Beach, North Carolina

Carova Beach or Carova is an unincorporated community in Currituck County in the extreme northeast corner of North Carolina, United States. The community, begun in the 1960s, is found on Currituck Banks, north of Bodie Island, and can only be accessed by boat or by four-wheel drive vehicle. There are no paved roads connecting Carova to the town of Corolla, North Carolina. The neighboring settlement of Sandbridge in Virginia Beach, Virginia is not accessible by vehicle from Carova. In the 1960s when development began in Carova there were plans to construct a paved road from Sandbridge south to Carova through the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge but these never materialized. Today there is a permanent fence from ocean to sound to keep vehicles from crossing but, more importantly, to keep the wild horses from migrating to the Virginia side of the border. To reach Carova, four-wheel drive vehicles must drive north along the beach from Corolla into the community, as access from Virginia is limited to pedestrians and bicyclists.

Currituck National Wildlife Refuge

Currituck National Wildlife Refuge, located on the northern end of North Carolina's Outer Banks, was established in 1984 to preserve and protect the coastal barrier island ecosystem. Refuge lands are managed to provide wintering habitat for waterfowl and to protect endangered species such as piping plover, sea turtles, and seabeach amaranth.

Core Banks, North Carolina

The Core Banks are barrier islands in North Carolina, part of the Outer Banks and Cape Lookout National Seashore. Named after the Coree tribe, they extend from Ocracoke Inlet to Cape Lookout, and consist of two low-relief narrow islands, North Core Banks and South Core Banks, and, since September 2011, two smaller islands. New Drum Inlet, Old Drum Inlet and Ophelia Inlet now separate the islands. The Core Banks are now uninhabited. However, Portsmouth, at the north end of the North Core Banks, was once a substantial port, and Cape Lookout Village, about one and half miles south of the Cape Lookout Lighthouse, contains the historic Lookout Life-Saving Station, a U.S. Coast Guard Station, and several island homes.

References

  1. "North Carolina Gazetteer" . Retrieved March 27, 2021.
  2. "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Buxton CDP, North Carolina". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved November 24, 2015.
  3. "National Register of Historic Places Listings". Weekly List of Actions Taken on Properties: 6/24/13 through 6/28/13. National Park Service. 2013-07-05.
  4. Davis, Kristin (August 26, 2007). "Cape Hatteras Secondary goes back to school in style". The Virginian-Pilot. Archived from the original on 2018-01-15. Retrieved July 1, 2017.
  5. "Attendance Areas - Dare County Schools". www.dare.k12.nc.us. Archived from the original on 2015-12-22. Retrieved 2015-12-17.
  6. "Cape Hatteras (U.S. Coast Guard) Burial Ground". Commonwealth War Graves Commission. Retrieved 25 October 2012.
  7. "USDA Interactive Plant Hardiness Map". United States Department of Agriculture . Retrieved August 6, 2019.
  8. "PRISM Climate Group, Oregon State University" . Retrieved August 6, 2019.
  9. "Water Temperature Table of All Coastal Regions" . Retrieved August 6, 2019.
  10. "U.S. Potential Natural Vegetation, Original Kuchler Types, v2.0 (Spatially Adjusted to Correct Geometric Distortions)" . Retrieved August 6, 2019.
Preceded by
Avon
Beaches of The Outer BanksSucceeded by
Cape Hatteras