Finland-Sweden Athletics International

Last updated
Finland-Sweden athletics international
Sport Athletics
Inaugural season1925
No. of teams2
Countries Flag of Finland.svg Finland
Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden
Flag of Germany (1935-1945).svg Germany (1940 only)
Most recent
champion(s)
Men: Sweden
Women: Sweden
Most titlesMen: Finland (46)
Women: Sweden (38)
Official website www.ruotsiottelu.fi (in Finnish)
www.finnkampen.se (in Swedish)

Finnkampen (Swedish, literally The Finn Battle), Suomi-Ruotsi-maaottelu (literally The Finland-Sweden match) or Ruotsi-ottelu (Sverigekampen, literally The Sweden Battle), is a yearly international athletics competition held between Sweden and Finland since 1925.

Contents

It is (since the late 1980s) the only annual athletics international with only two participating countries still held at a professional level. The two-day event attracts significant audiences, with a combined total of over 50,000 tickets sold for the 2011 competition. [1] Three-time heptathlon world champion Carolina Klüft made her final international appearance for Sweden at the meeting in 2012. [2]

Competition

2013 Finland-Sweden international in Stockholm Fantastiskt vader pa Stadion idag.jpg
2013 Finland-Sweden international in Stockholm

The competition is actually divided into two internationals, one for men and one for women. Youth competitions for men and women are also held. Each country provides their three best participants in each of the events, except for the relays where there are four participants (one team) from each country. Traditionally, the competitions have been arranged alternatively, with Finland hosting in even years and Sweden in odd years. This has changed few times in recent years, seeing one country arranging the international twice in a row a few times. The reasons for this include stadium renovations and major international competitions. Points are given to all contestants completing their event (no points are given to athletes who are disqualified, do not finish the event or don't get the result in field competitions), based on the final position in every event. Points given in each event are, from 1st to 6th place: 7-5-4-3-2-1, and in relays 1st and 2nd place are awarded with 5 and 2 points.

The competition may not be a world class one looking at the results, no single world record has been set, but there are few competitions in the world that are fiercer and more prestigious. This is most often seen in the middle-distance running, where tactics are more important than time, and these events have seen many foul tricks during the years, in 1992 resulting in the disqualification of all six runners in the men's 1500 metres event.

Another important aspect of the event is that it is a team competition. A competitor who manages to reach fourth place instead of a projected sixth place can be just as important, or even more important, for the end result as a "star" that secures the expected first place. A fight to the finish between competitor number five and six, half a lap behind the winner, can be just as important as the actual winner. The race is not over until the last competitor crosses the line. For many of the competitors the international is the most prestigious competition of the year.

The events in Finland have always been held in Helsinki, after 1939 at the Helsinki Olympic Stadium, but 2016 and 2018 events took place in Tampere Ratina Stadium due to renovation of the Olympic Stadium. The Swedish events have mostly been held in Stockholm at the Stockholm Olympic Stadium. From 1999 until 2012 they were held in Gothenburg at the Ullevi Stadium because of larger spectator capacity.

Events

History

1500 meters in 1939 Arne Andersson 1939.jpg
1500 meters in 1939

Finnkampen was held for the first time in Helsinki in 1925, with one of the participants being the five-time Olympic champion in the 1924 Summer Olympics, Paavo Nurmi. Competitions were held in 1927, 1929 and 1931. After a pause of eight years the next competition was held in 1939, just before the outbreak of the Second World War, which led to the cancellation of the competition between 1941 and 1944. The 1940 competition was held as a triple event between Finland, Sweden and Germany, with only two athletes from each country competing in each event. The international has been continually held for men since 1945 and for women since 1964, although the first women's competition was held already in 1953.

1931 breakup

The first competitions were very much influenced by the love-hate relationship between Sweden and Finland. The 1931 event was a victory for Finland, but tensions at the track led to a knuckle fight between the runners-up in the 800 metres race.

At the banquet after the games, the new chairman of the Finnish athletics union and future president of Finland, Urho Kekkonen announced that Finland would no longer take part in the event. The tension was in a large part caused by Swedish attempts, spearheaded by Sigfrid Edström, the Swedish president of the IAAF and vice-president of the IOC, to have Paavo Nurmi declared a professional athlete, and thus banned from international competitions. After Kekkonen's speech Swedish efforts intensified, and Nurmi was banned from the 1932 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles.

It took eight years until 1939, before the Finns again decided to participate in the games, at the eve of the planned 1940 Summer Olympics in Helsinki. [3]

Results

YearLocationWinner (men)ResultWinner (women)Result
1925 Helsinki Flag of Finland.svg Finland99–85
1927 Stockholm Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden98–86
1929 Helsinki Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden93–90
1931 Stockholm Flag of Finland.svg Finland104–76
1939 Stockholm Flag of Finland.svg Finland112–102
1940 Helsinki Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden111–103
1945 Stockholm Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden105–79
1946 Helsinki Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden114.5–68.5
1947 Gothenburg Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden106–78
1948 Helsingborg Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden138–76
1950 Stockholm Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden123–88
1951 Helsinki Flag of Finland.svg Finland216–194
1953 Stockholm/Jyväskylä [4] Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden217–193 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden58–48
1954 Helsinki/Eskilstuna Flag of Finland.svg Finland207–202 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden64–42
1955 Stockholm/Valkeakoski Flag of Finland.svg Finland213–196 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden58–48
1956 Helsinki Flag of Finland.svg Finland209–201
1957 Stockholm/Lahti Flag of Finland.svg Finland208–201 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden64–42
1958 Helsinki/Jönköping Flag of Finland.svg Finland232–177 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden66–51
1959 Gothenburg/Vammala Flag of Finland.svg Finland209–200 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden64–53
1960 Helsinki/Linköping Flag of Finland.svg Finland216–194 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden67–50
1961 Stockholm/Kouvola Flag of Finland.svg Finland220.5–189.5 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden68.5–48.5
1962 Helsinki Flag of Finland.svg Finland219–190
1963 Stockholm Flag of Finland.svg Finland220–190
1964 Helsinki Flag of Finland.svg Finland210.5–199.5 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden64–53
1965 Stockholm Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden210–200 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden65-52
1966 Helsinki Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden208.5–199.5 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden62–55
1967 Stockholm Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden212–198 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden66–51
1968 Helsinki Flag of Finland.svg Finland208.5–199.5 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden64–52
1969 Stockholm Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden212.5–195.5 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden75–60
1970 Helsinki Flag of Finland.svg Finland227–182 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden82–53
1971 Gothenburg Flag of Finland.svg Finland224–183 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden71–64
1972 Helsinki Flag of Finland.svg Finland236.5–173.5 Flag of Finland.svg Finland73–60
1973 Stockholm Flag of Finland.svg Finland223–187 Flag of Finland.svg Finland77–69
1974 Helsinki Flag of Finland.svg Finland207–200 Flag of Finland.svg Finland75–60
1975 Stockholm Flag of Finland.svg Finland214–191 Flag of Finland.svg Finland94–62
1976 Helsinki Flag of Finland.svg Finland223–187 Flag of Finland.svg Finland91–66
1977 Stockholm Flag of Finland.svg Finland212–194 Flag of Finland.svg Finland86–69
1978 Helsinki Flag of Finland.svg Finland240–168 Flag of Finland.svg Finland85–72
1979 Stockholm Flag of Finland.svg Finland214–194 Flag of Finland.svg Finland80–77
1980 Helsinki Flag of Finland.svg Finland232–178 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden79–78
1981 Stockholm Flag of Finland.svg Finland214–196 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden81–75
1982 Helsinki Flag of Finland.svg Finland215–193 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden79–78
1983 Stockholm Flag of Finland.svg Finland234–176 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden83–74
1984 Helsinki Flag of Finland.svg Finland216–193 Flag of Finland.svg Finland155–145
1985 Stockholm Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden219–185 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden166–156
1986 Helsinki Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden210.5–198.5 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden184–138
1987 Stockholm Flag of Finland.svg Finland210.5–197.5 Flag of Finland.svg Finland165–157
1988 Helsinki Flag of Finland.svg Finland229.5–180.5 Flag of Finland.svg Finland170–150
1989 Stockholm Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden213–197 Flag of Finland.svg Finland184–138
1990 Helsinki Flag of Finland.svg Finland217–193 Flag of Finland.svg Finland182–140
1991 Stockholm Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden226–183 Flag of Finland.svg Finland197–147
1992 Helsinki Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden198–187 Flag of Finland.svg Finland195–149
1993 Stockholm Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden215–192 Flag of Finland.svg Finland198–144
1994 Stockholm Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden219–190 Flag of Finland.svg Finland174–170
1995 Helsinki Flag of Finland.svg Finland213–196 Flag of Finland.svg Finland196–146
1996 Helsinki Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden205.5–202.5 Flag of Finland.svg Finland215–173
1997 Stockholm Flag of Finland.svg Finland207.5–198.5 Flag of Finland.svg Finland223–165
1998 Helsinki Flag of Finland.svg Finland206–200 Flag of Finland.svg Finland210–178
1999 Gothenburg Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden210–198 Flag of Finland.svg Finland212–175
2000 Helsinki Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden216–194 Flag of Finland.svg Finland219–191
2001 Gothenburg Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden218–185 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden213–197
2002 Helsinki Flag of Finland.svg Finland223–187 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden215.5–192.5
2003 Helsinki Flag of Finland.svg Finland205–203 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden208.5–201.5
2004 Gothenburg Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden217–191 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden228.5–178.5
2005 Gothenburg Flag of Finland.svg Finland212–197 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden230–179
2006 Helsinki Flag of Finland.svg Finland204–201 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden226–183
2007 Gothenburg Flag of Finland.svg Finland203–199 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden219–189
2008 Helsinki Flag of Finland.svg Finland215–193 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden209.5–197.5
2009 Gothenburg Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden208–200 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden213–197
2010 Helsinki Flag of Finland.svg Finland214–195 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden226–182
2011 Helsinki Flag of Finland.svg Finland206–194 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden225–182
2012 Gothenburg Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden220–187 Flag of Finland.svg Finland223–187
2013 Stockholm Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden235–173 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden215–195
2014 Helsinki Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden216–193 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden206–204
2015 Stockholm Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden231–179 Flag of Finland.svg Finland213.5–193.5
2016 Tampere Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden210–200 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden213–197
2017 Stockholm Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden216–188 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden232.5–177.5
2018 Tampere Flag of Finland.svg Finland206–202 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden216–194
2019 Stockholm Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden228–181 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden217.5–192.5
2020 Tampere Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden206–201 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden221–186
2021 Stockholm Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden230–201 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden223.5–207.5

Totals

Finland Flag of Finland.svg 46 – 35 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden

Finland Flag of Finland.svg 25 – 41 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden

Finland Flag of Finland.svg 71 – 76 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden

Competition records

Men

EventRecordAthleteNationalityDatePlaceRef
100 m 10.19 Peter Karlsson Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden1996 Flag of Finland.svg Helsinki, Finland
200 m 20.47 Johan Wissman Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden2007 Flag of Sweden.svg Gothenburg, Sweden
400 m 45.79 Markku Kukkoaho Flag of Finland.svg Finland1974 Flag of Finland.svg Helsinki, Finland
800 m 1:44.5 Pekka Vasala Flag of Finland.svg Finland1972 Flag of Finland.svg Helsinki, Finland
1500 m 3:38.02 Ulf Högberg Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden1974 Flag of Finland.svg Helsinki, Finland
5000 m 13:29.26 Andreas Almgren Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden2021 Flag of Sweden.svg Stockholm, Sweden [5]
10000 m 28:04.86 Martti Vainio Flag of Finland.svg Finland1978 Flag of Finland.svg Helsinki, Finland
3000 m steeplechase 8:20.8 Anders Gärderud Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden1974 Flag of Finland.svg Helsinki, Finland
110 m hurdles 13.44 Robert Kronberg Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden2000 Flag of Finland.svg Helsinki, Finland
400 m hurdles 48.86 Niklas Wallenlind Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden1992 Flag of Finland.svg Helsinki, Finland
High jump 2.35 m Stefan Holm Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden2004 Flag of Sweden.svg Gothenburg, Sweden
Pole vault 6.00 m Armand Duplantis Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden24 August 2019 Flag of Sweden.svg Stockholm, Sweden [6]
Long jump 8.24 m Thobias Montler Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden2021 Flag of Sweden.svg Stockholm, Sweden [7]
Triple jump 17.51 m Christian Olsson Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden2003 Flag of Finland.svg Helsinki, Finland
Shot put 20.86 m Reijo Ståhlberg Flag of Finland.svg Finland1978 Flag of Finland.svg Helsinki, Finland
Discus throw 69.42 m Daniel Ståhl Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden25 August 2019 Flag of Sweden.svg Stockholm, Sweden [8]
Hammer throw 79.35 m Olli-Pekka Karjalainen Flag of Finland.svg Finland2002 Flag of Finland.svg Helsinki, Finland
Javelin throw 89.36 m Seppo Räty Flag of Finland.svg Finland1990 Flag of Finland.svg Helsinki, Finland
10000 m walk (track)38:03.95 Perseus Karlström Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden24 August 2019 Flag of Sweden.svg Stockholm, Sweden [9]
4 × 100 m relay 39.27Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden1996 Flag of Finland.svg Helsinki, Finland
4 × 400 m relay 3:05.81Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden2021 Flag of Sweden.svg Stockholm, Sweden

Women

EventRecordAthleteNationalityDatePlaceRef
100 m 11.31 Linda Haglund Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden1978 Flag of Finland.svg Helsinki, Finland
200 m 22.95 Irene Ekelund Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden2013 Flag of Sweden.svg Stockholm, Sweden
400 m 50.78 Riitta Salin Flag of Finland.svg Finland1974 Flag of Finland.svg Helsinki, Finland
800 m 2:00.50 Malin Ewerlöf Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden1998 Flag of Finland.svg Helsinki, Finland
1500 m 4:09.40 Sara Kuivisto Flag of Finland.svg Finland2021 Flag of Sweden.svg Stockholm, Sweden
5000 m 15:19.17 Annemari Sandell Flag of Finland.svg Finland1995 Flag of Finland.svg Helsinki, Finland
10000 m 31:57.15 Midde Hamrin Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden1990 Flag of Finland.svg Helsinki, Finland
3000 m steeplechase 9:38.38 Sandra Eriksson Flag of Finland.svg Finland2013 Flag of Sweden.svg Stockholm, Sweden
100 m hurdles 12.80 Susanna Kallur Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden2007 Flag of Sweden.svg Gothenburg, Sweden
400 m hurdles 54.58 Anne-Louise Skoglund Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden1986 Flag of Finland.svg Helsinki, Finland
High jump 2.01 m Kajsa Bergqvist Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden2002 Flag of Finland.svg Helsinki, Finland
Pole vault 4.61 m Angelica Bengtsson Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden25 August 2019 Flag of Sweden.svg Stockholm, Sweden [10]
Long jump 6.82 m Ringa Ropo-Junnila Flag of Finland.svg Finland1989 Flag of Sweden.svg Stockholm, Sweden
Triple jump 14.34 m Heli Koivula Flag of Finland.svg Finland2002 Flag of Finland.svg Helsinki, Finland
Shot put 18.65 m Fanny Roos Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden2021 Flag of Sweden.svg Stockholm, Sweden
Discus throw 61.87 m Anna Söderberg Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden2008 Flag of Finland.svg Helsinki, Finland
Hammer throw 71.26 m Ida Storm Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden3 September 2017 Flag of Sweden.svg Stockholm, Sweden [11]
Javelin throw 63.56 m Paula Tarvainen Flag of Finland.svg Finland2006 Flag of Finland.svg Helsinki, Finland
5000 m walk (track)20:54.62 Sari Essayah Flag of Finland.svg Finland1995 Flag of Finland.svg Helsinki, Finland
4 × 100 m relay 43.61 Emma Rienas
Carolina Klüft
Jenny Kallur
Susanna Kallur
Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden2005 Flag of Sweden.svg Gothenburg, Sweden
4 × 400 m relay 3:33:30Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden2002 Flag of Finland.svg Helsinki, Finland

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References

  1. Sonninen, A-P (2011-09-12). Finland and Sweden share match victories in famous annual match. IAAF. Retrieved on 2011-09-17.
  2. Julin, A. Lennart (2012-09-03). Swedish men, Finnish women victorious in Gothenburg as Klüft takes final bow. IAAF. Retrieved on 2013-01-19.
  3. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2006-10-09. Retrieved 2006-08-27.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
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  5. "Almgren raderade ut 49 år gammalt Finnkampsrekord". SVT Sport (in Swedish). 2021-09-04. Retrieved 2021-09-05.
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  7. "Montlers jättehopp – nytt Finnkampsrekord". SVT Sport (in Swedish). 2021-09-05. Retrieved 2021-09-05.
  8. "Finland-Sweden Athletics International 2019 Results". SF. 25 August 2019. Retrieved 3 September 2019.
  9. "Finland-Sweden Athletics International 2019 Racewalking Results". SF. 25 August 2019. Retrieved 3 September 2019.
  10. "Finland-Sweden Athletics International 2019 Results". SF. 25 August 2019. Retrieved 3 September 2019.
  11. Jon Mulkeen (3 September 2017). "Stahl leads Sweden to record-breaking victory at Finnkampen". IAAF. Retrieved 4 September 2017.