Fort Calhoun, Nebraska

Last updated
Fort Calhoun, Nebraska
Fort Calhoun, Nebraska downtown 1.JPG
Downtown Fort Calhoun: U.S. Highway 75
Washington County Nebraska Incorporated and Unincorporated areas Fort Calhoun Highlighted.svg
Location of Fort Calhoun, Nebraska
Coordinates: 41°27′24″N96°1′29″W / 41.45667°N 96.02472°W / 41.45667; -96.02472 Coordinates: 41°27′24″N96°1′29″W / 41.45667°N 96.02472°W / 41.45667; -96.02472
Country United States
State Nebraska
County Washington
Area
[1]
  Total0.66 sq mi (1.70 km2)
  Land0.66 sq mi (1.70 km2)
  Water0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation
1,099 ft (335 m)
Population
 (2010) [2]
  Total908
  Estimate 
(2017) [3]
941
  Density1,434.45/sq mi (553.46/km2)
Time zone UTC-6 (Central (CST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code
68023
Area code(s) 402
FIPS code 31-17145 [4]
GNIS feature ID0829350 [5]

Fort Calhoun is a city in Washington County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 908 at the 2010 census. The city includes Fort Atkinson, the first fort built west of the Missouri River.

Washington County, Nebraska U.S. county in Nebraska

Washington County is a county in the U.S. state of Nebraska. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 20,234. Its county seat is Blair.

Nebraska U.S. state in the United States

Nebraska is a state that lies in both the Great Plains and the Midwestern United States. It is bordered by South Dakota to the north; Iowa to the east and Missouri to the southeast, both across the Missouri River; Kansas to the south; Colorado to the southwest; and Wyoming to the west. It is the only triply landlocked U.S. state.

Fort Atkinson (Nebraska) United States historic place

Fort Atkinson was the first United States Army post to be established west of the Missouri River in the unorganized region of the Louisiana Purchase of the United States. Located just east of present-day Fort Calhoun, Nebraska, the fort was erected in 1819 and abandoned in 1827. The site is now known as Fort Atkinson State Historical Park and is a National Historic Landmark. A replica fort was constructed by the state at the site during the 1980s–1990s.

Contents

History

Fort Calhoun was platted in 1855. [6] It was named for John C. Calhoun. [7]

Plat map showing a piece of land, drawn to scale, with details such as nearby properties, boundaries, land size, flood zones, the surrounding neighborhood, easements, and monuments

In the United States, a plat is a map, drawn to scale, showing the divisions of a piece of land. United States General Land Office surveyors drafted township plats of Public Lands Surveys to show the distance and bearing between section corners, sometimes including topographic or vegetation information. City, town or village plats show subdivisions into blocks with streets and alleys. Further refinement often splits blocks into individual lots, usually for the purpose of selling the described lots; this has become known as subdivision.

John C. Calhoun 7th Vice President of the United States

John Caldwell Calhoun was an American statesman from the Democratic party and political theorist from South Carolina who served as the seventh vice president of the United States from 1825 to 1832. He is remembered for strongly defending slavery and for advancing the concept of minority rights in politics, which he did in the context of protecting the interests of the white South when it was outnumbered by Northerners. He began his political career as a nationalist, modernizer, and proponent of a strong national government and protective tariffs. In the late 1820s, his views changed radically, and he became a leading proponent of states' rights, limited government, nullification, and opposition to high tariffs—he saw Northern acceptance of these policies as a condition of the South remaining in the Union. His beliefs and warnings heavily influenced the South's secession from the Union in 1860–1861.

Geography

Fort Calhoun is located at 41°27′24″N96°1′29″W / 41.45667°N 96.02472°W / 41.45667; -96.02472 (41.456691, -96.024589). [8]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.65 square miles (1.68 km2), all of it land. [9]

United States Census Bureau Bureau of the United States responsible for the census and related statistics

The United States Census Bureau is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce and its director is appointed by the President of the United States.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1870 236
1880 2401.7%
1900 346
1910 324−6.4%
1920 309−4.6%
1930 3090.0%
1940 3296.5%
1950 314−4.6%
1960 45845.9%
1970 64240.2%
1980 641−0.2%
1990 6481.1%
2000 85632.1%
2010 9086.1%
Est. 2017941 [3] 3.6%
U.S. Decennial Census [10]

2010 census

As of the census [2] of 2010, there were 908 people, 391 households, and 253 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,396.9 inhabitants per square mile (539.3/km2). There were 413 housing units at an average density of 635.4 per square mile (245.3/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 96.7% White, 0.2% African American, 0.2% Native American, 0.1% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.7% from other races, and 2.0% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.2% of the population.

Census Acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population

A census is the procedure of systematically acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population. This term is used mostly in connection with national population and housing censuses; other common censuses include traditional culture, business, supplies, and traffic censuses. The United Nations defines the essential features of population and housing censuses as "individual enumeration, universality within a defined territory, simultaneity and defined periodicity", and recommends that population censuses be taken at least every 10 years. United Nations recommendations also cover census topics to be collected, official definitions, classifications and other useful information to co-ordinate international practices.

Population density A measurement of population numbers per unit area or volume

Population density is a measurement of population per unit area, or exceptionally unit volume; it is a quantity of type number density. It is frequently applied to living organisms, and most of the time to humans. It is a key geographical term. In simple terms population density refers to the number of people living in an area per kilometer square.

There were 391 households of which 28.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.9% were married couples living together, 11.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.8% had a male householder with no wife present, and 35.3% were non-families. 32.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 2.95.

Marriage Social union or legal contract between people called spouses that creates kinship

Marriage, also called matrimony or wedlock, is a culturally recognised union between people, called spouses, that establishes rights and obligations between them, as well as between them and their children, and between them and their in-laws. The definition of marriage varies around the world not only between cultures and between religions, but also throughout the history of any given culture and religion, evolving to both expand and constrict in who and what is encompassed, but typically it is principally an institution in which interpersonal relationships, usually sexual, are acknowledged or sanctioned. In some cultures, marriage is recommended or considered to be compulsory before pursuing any sexual activity. When defined broadly, marriage is considered a cultural universal. Article 16 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights declares that "Men and women of full age, without any limitation due to race, nationality or religion, have the right to marry and to found a family. They are entitled to equal rights as to marriage, during marriage and at its dissolution. Marriage shall be entered into only with the free and full consent of the intending spouses."

The median age in the city was 41.4 years. 24.9% of residents were under the age of 18; 4.6% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 24.1% were from 25 to 44; 30.8% were from 45 to 64; and 15.7% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 51.4% male and 48.6% female.

2000 census

As of the census [4] of 2000, there were 856 people, 342 households, and 229 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,380.5 people per square mile (533.1/km²). There were 375 housing units at an average density of 604.8 per square mile (233.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 98.48% White, 0.58% African American, 0.12% Native American, 0.12% from other races, and 0.70% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.29% of the population.

There were 342 households out of which 36.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.7% were married couples living together, 8.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.0% were non-families. 30.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 3.16.

In the city, the population was spread out with 27.9% under the age of 18, 7.6% from 18 to 24, 27.3% from 25 to 44, 22.7% from 45 to 64, and 14.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.5 males.

As of 2000 the median income for a household in the city was $41,500, and the median income for a family was $57,679. Males had a median income of $36,250 versus $25,000 for females. The per capita income for the city was $20,779. About 3.1% of families and 3.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.1% of those under the age of 18 and 6.0% of those 65 and older.

See also

Related Research Articles

Bruno, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Bruno is a village in Butler County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 99 at the 2010 census.

Cedar Creek, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Cedar Creek is a village in Cass County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 390 at the 2010 census.

South Bend, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

South Bend is a village in Cass County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 99 at the 2010 census. The main landmark is a pedestrian bridge across the Platte River which leads to Schramm Park State Recreation Area. It was built in 2004 on the pillars of the abandoned Rock Island Railroad bridge. 35 trains a day—most of them coal trains—still pass through the area on the BNSF Railway main.

Dixon, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Dixon is a village in Dixon County, Nebraska, United States. It is part of the Sioux City, IA–NE–SD Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 87 at the 2010 census.

Maskell, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Maskell is a village in Dixon County, Nebraska, United States. It is part of the Sioux City, IA–NE–SD Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 76 at the 2010 census.

Uehling, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Uehling is a village in Dodge County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 230 at the 2010 census.

Ralston, Nebraska City in Nebraska, United States

Ralston is a city in Douglas County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 5,943 at the 2010 census. Ralston is surrounded on three sides by the city of Omaha, and by Sarpy County on the south side.

Waterloo, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Waterloo is a village in Douglas County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 848 at the 2010 census.

Ashland, Nebraska City in Nebraska, United States

Ashland is a city in Saunders County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 2,453 at the 2010 census.

Ithaca, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Ithaca is a village in Saunders County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 148 at the 2010 census.

Malmo, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Malmo is a village in Saunders County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 120 at the 2010 census.

Memphis, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Memphis is a village in Saunders County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 114 at the 2010 census.

Morse Bluff, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Morse Bluff is a village in Saunders County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 135 at the 2010 census.

Prague, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Prague is a village in Saunders County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 303 at the 2010 census. It was named after Prague, capital of Bohemia.

Walthill, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Walthill is a village in Thurston County, Nebraska, United States, within the Omaha Reservation. The population was 780 at the 2010 census.

Herman, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Herman is a village in Washington County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 268 at the 2010 census.

Washington, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Washington is a village in Washington County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 150 at the 2010 census.

Benedict, Nebraska Village in Nebraska, United States

Benedict is a village in York County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 234 at the 2010 census.

Plaza, North Dakota City in North Dakota, United States

Plaza is a city in Mountrail County, North Dakota, United States. The population was 171 at the 2010 census. Plaza was founded in 1906. The business district is built around a central town square, city park or "plaza". A key feature of the plaza is a recently-completed large covered gazebo.

References

  1. "2017 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Jan 12, 2019.
  2. 1 2 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2012-06-24.
  3. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  4. 1 2 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  5. "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  6. "Fort Calhoun, Washington County". Center for Advanced Land Management Information Technologies. University of Nebraska. Retrieved 24 August 2014.
  7. "Profile for Fort Calhoun, NE". ePodunk . Retrieved 24 August 2014.
  8. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  9. "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-07-02. Retrieved 2012-06-24.
  10. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015.