Grey noise

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Colors of noise
White
Pink
Red (Brownian)
Grey

Grey noise is random noise whose frequency spectrum follows a psychoacoustic equal loudness curve (such as an inverted A-weighting curve).

Grey noise spectrum Gray noise spectrum.svg
Grey noise spectrum

The result is that grey noise contains all frequencies with equal loudness, as opposed to white noise, which contains all frequencies with equal energy. The difference between the two is the result of psychoacoustics, more specifically the fact that the human hearing is more sensitive to some frequencies than others.

Since equal-loudness curves depend not only on the individual but also on the volume at which the noise is played back, there is no one true grey noise. [1] A mathematically simpler and clearly defined approximation of an equal-loudness noise is pink noise which creates an equal amount of energy per octave, not per hertz (i. e. a logarithmic instead of a linear behavior), so pink noise is closer to "equally loud at all frequencies" than white noise is. [2]

Inverse ITU-R 468 weighted "grey noise"

See also

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Phon unit of loudness level for pure tones

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Weighting

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Sub-band coding

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References

  1. Pigeon, Dr. Ir. Stéphane. "High Quality Grey Noise - wav mp3 Audio Files Download". www.audiocheck.net.
  2. "White Noise Definition Vs. Pink Noise – Acoustic Fields". 12 February 2014.