Worley noise

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Example picture generated with Worley noise's basic algorithm. Tweaking of seed points and colors would be necessary to make this look like stone. Worley.jpg
Example picture generated with Worley noise's basic algorithm. Tweaking of seed points and colors would be necessary to make this look like stone.

Worley noise is a noise function introduced by Steven Worley in 1996. In computer graphics it is used to create procedural textures, [1] i.e. textures that are created automatically with arbitrary precision and do not have to be drawn by hand. Worley noise comes close to simulating textures of stone, water, or biological cells.

Contents

Basic algorithm

The algorithm chooses random points in space (2- or 3-dimensional) and then for every location in space takes the distances dn to the nth-closest point (e.g. the second-closest point) and uses combinations of those to control color information (note that dn+1 > dn). More precisely:

See also

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Procedural texture

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This is a glossary of terms relating to computer graphics.

Noise refers to many types of random or unwanted signals, most commonly acoustic noise, but also including the following:

References

  1. Patrick Cozzi; Christophe Riccio (2012). OpenGL Insights. CRC Press. pp. 113–115. ISBN   978-1-4398-9376-0.

Further reading