IEEE 1667

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IEEE 1667 ("Standard Protocol for Authentication in Host Attachments of Transient Storage Devices") is a standard published and maintained by the IEEE that describes various methods for authenticating transient storage devices such as USB flash drives when they are inserted into a computer.[ citation needed ] The protocol is universal, and thus operating-system independent. On 25 November 2008 Microsoft announced that IEEE 1667 will be implemented on Windows 7.[ citation needed ] It is currently part of Windows Vista (SP2) and Windows 7, [1] Server 2008, [2] Server 2012, Windows 8, Windows 8.1 and Windows 10.

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References

  1. "Enhanced Storage". MSDN.Microsoft.com. Microsoft . Retrieved 14 October 2016.
  2. "Introducing Enhanced Storage Access". Technet.Microsoft.com. Microsoft. 9 March 2008. Retrieved 14 October 2016.

Further reading

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