IIHF European Cup

Last updated
IIHF European Cup
Statuscancelled
Genresports event
Date(s)varying
Frequencybiannual
Location(s)various
Inaugurated1965 (1965)
Most recent1996 (1996)
Organised by IIHF

The IIHF European Cup, also known as the Europa Cup, was a European ice hockey club competition for champions of national leagues which was contested between 1965 and 1997, governed by the International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF).

Contents

History

The competition was originated by Günther Sabetzki, [1] based on the European Cup of association football (now UEFA Champions League).

The tournament encountered problems. Countries had different levels of development in ice hockey, so some teams were weaker than others, resulting in a number of uncompetitive, one-sided games. Organisational difficulties were also posed by the refusal of some Soviet Union teams to play away games in certain places. This resulted in no final being held some years, and more than one final being held in others. The competition was discontinued after 1997. In its place, the European Hockey League and the Continental Cup, and later the IIHF European Champions Cup, were started.

Format

Teams were seeded and drawn into groups of four teams, with the winners of each group progressing to the next round, where they were drawn into groups again. Each round was played over a long weekend (Friday to Sunday) in a single venue, until one final group was left, the winner of which would be considered the champion. After the European Cup was discontinued, the Continental Cup would adopt this format.

Winners

Knockout, 1965/66–1977/78
SeasonWinnerScoreRunner-up
1965–66 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg ZKL Brno 6–4, 7–5, 6–2, 6–1 Flag of Germany.svg EV Füssen
1966–67 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg ZKL Brno 3–2, 5–4 Flag of Finland.svg Ilves
1967–68 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg ZKL Brno 3–0, 3–3 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Dukla Jihlava
1968–69 Flag of the Soviet Union.svg CSKA Moscow 9–1, 14–3 Flag of Austria.svg EC KAC
1969–70 Flag of the Soviet Union.svg CSKA Moscow 2–3, 8–5 Flag of the Soviet Union.svg Spartak Moscow
1970–71 Flag of the Soviet Union.svg CSKA Moscow 7–0, 3–3 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Dukla Jihlava
1971–72 Flag of the Soviet Union.svg CSKA Moscow 8–2, 8–3 Flag of Sweden.svg Brynäs
1972–73 Flag of the Soviet Union.svg CSKA Moscow 6–2, 12–2 Flag of Sweden.svg Brynäs
1973–74 Flag of the Soviet Union.svg CSKA Moscow 2–3, 6–1 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Tesla Pardubice
1974–75 Flag of the Soviet Union.svg Krylya Sovetov Moscow 2–3, 7–0 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Dukla Jihlava
1975–76 Flag of the Soviet Union.svg CSKA Moscow 6–0, 4–2 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Poldi Kladno
1976–77 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Poldi Kladno 4–4, 4–4 (2-1 SO) Flag of the Soviet Union.svg Spartak Moscow
1977–78 Flag of the Soviet Union.svg CSKA Moscow 3–1 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Poldi Kladno
Group, 1978/79–1989/90
SeasonWinnerRunner-upThirdVenue
1978–79 Flag of the Soviet Union.svg CSKA Moscow Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Poldi Kladno Flag of Finland.svg Ässät Innsbruck, Austria
1979–80 Flag of the Soviet Union.svg CSKA Moscow Flag of Finland.svg Tappara Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Slovan Bratislava Innsbruck, Austria
1980–81 Flag of the Soviet Union.svg CSKA Moscow Flag of Finland.svg HIFK Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Poldi Kladno Urtijëi, Italy
1981–82 Flag of the Soviet Union.svg CSKA Moscow Flag of the Czech Republic.svg TJ Vítkovice Flag of Germany.svg SC Riessersee Düsseldorf, West Germany
1982–83 Flag of the Soviet Union.svg CSKA Moscow Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Dukla Jihlava Flag of Finland.svg Tappara Tampere, Finland
1983–84 Flag of the Soviet Union.svg CSKA Moscow Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Dukla Jihlava Flag of East Germany.svg Dynamo Berlin Urtijëi, Italy
1984–85 Flag of the Soviet Union.svg CSKA Moscow Flag of Germany.svg Kölner EC Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Dukla Jihlava Megève, France
1985–86 Flag of the Soviet Union.svg CSKA Moscow Flag of Sweden.svg Södertälje SK Flag of Germany.svg SB Rosenheim Rosenheim, West Germany
1986–87 Flag of the Soviet Union.svg CSKA Moscow Flag of the Czech Republic.svg TJ VSŽ Košice Flag of Sweden.svg Färjestad BK Lugano, Switzerland
1987–88 Flag of the Soviet Union.svg CSKA Moscow Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Tesla Pardubice Flag of Finland.svg Tappara Davos, Switzerland
1988–89 Flag of the Soviet Union.svg CSKA Moscow Flag of the Czech Republic.svg TJ VSŽ Košice Flag of Germany.svg Kölner EC Cologne, West Germany
1989–90 Flag of the Soviet Union.svg CSKA Moscow Flag of Finland.svg TPS Flag of Sweden.svg Djurgårdens IF Berlin, West Germany
Knockout, 1990–1996
SeasonWinnerScoreRunner-upVenue
1990 Flag of Sweden.svg Djurgårdens IF 3–2 Flag of the Soviet Union.svg Dynamo Moscow Düsseldorf, Germany
1991 Flag of Sweden.svg Djurgårdens IF 7–2 Flag of Germany.svg Düsseldorfer EG Düsseldorf, Germany
1992 Flag of Sweden.svg Malmö IF 3–3 (1-0 SO) Flag of Russia (1991-1993).svg Dynamo Moscow Düsseldorf, Germany
1993 Flag of Finland.svg TPS 4–3 Flag of Russia.svg Dynamo Moscow Düsseldorf, Germany
1994 Flag of Finland.svg Jokerit 4–2 Flag of Russia.svg Lada Togliatti Helsinki, Turku, Finland
1995 Flag of Finland.svg Jokerit 3–3 (3-2 SO) Flag of Germany.svg Kölner Haie Cologne, Germany
1996 Flag of Russia.svg Lada Togliatti 4–3 (OT) Flag of Sweden.svg Modo Düsseldorf, Germany

Source: [2]

By nation

Performance by nation
NationWinnersRunners-upthird
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia
2260
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia 4132
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 343
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 342
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
Flag of Germany.svg West Germany
Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany
044
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 001

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References

  1. Ice Hockey and Olympism page 187
  2. "European Cup (1966-1997)". International Ice Hockey Federation . Retrieved 2020-01-23.