Jansenville

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Jansenville
Dutch Reformed Church Jansenville-001.jpg
Dutch Reformed Church, Jansenville
South Africa Eastern Cape location map.svg
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Jansenville
South Africa adm location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Jansenville
Coordinates: 32°36′S24°40′E / 32.600°S 24.667°E / -32.600; 24.667 Coordinates: 32°36′S24°40′E / 32.600°S 24.667°E / -32.600; 24.667
Country South Africa
Province Eastern Cape
District Sarah Baartman
Municipality Dr Beyers Naudé
Established1855 [1]
Area
[2]
  Total24.9 km2 (9.6 sq mi)
Population
 (2011) [2]
  Total5,612
  Density230/km2 (580/sq mi)
Racial makeup (2011)
[2]
   Black African 42.9%
   Coloured 48.7%
   Indian/Asian 0.2%
   White 7.8%
  Other0.5%
First languages (2011)
[2]
   Afrikaans 65.4%
   Xhosa 30.7%
   English 1.7%
  Other2.2%
Time zone UTC+2 (SAST)
Postal code (street)
6265
PO box
6265
Area code 049

Jansenville is a town in Sarah Baartman District Municipality in the Eastern Cape province of South Africa.

Sarah Baartman District Municipality District municipality in Eastern Cape, South Africa

Sarah Baartman District Municipality is situated in the western part of the Eastern Cape province, covering an area of 58 242 square kilometres. The area of the district municipality includes nine local municipalities. The seat of Sarah Baartman is the city of Port Elizabeth, although Port Elizabeth is not itself in the district. The languages most spoken among the 388,201 people are Xhosa and Afrikaans.. The district code is DC10.

Eastern Cape Province of South Africa

The Eastern Cape is a province of South Africa. Its capital is Bhisho, but its two largest cities are East London and Port Elizabeth, South Africa. The second largest province in the country at 168 966 km2 after Northern Cape. It was formed in 1994 out of the Xhosa homelands or bantustans of Transkei and Ciskei, together with the eastern portion of the Cape Province. The central and eastern part of the province is the traditional home of the indigenous Xhosa people. In 1820 this area began to be settled by Europeans who originally came from England and some from Scotland and Ireland.

South Africa Republic in the southernmost part of Africa

South Africa, officially the Republic of South Africa (RSA), is the southernmost country in Africa. It is bounded to the south by 2,798 kilometres (1,739 mi) of coastline of Southern Africa stretching along the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans; to the north by the neighbouring countries of Namibia, Botswana, and Zimbabwe; and to the east and northeast by Mozambique and Eswatini (Swaziland); and it surrounds the enclaved country of Lesotho. South Africa is the largest country in Southern Africa and the 24th-largest country in the world by land area and, with over 58 million people, is also the world's 24th-most populous nation. It is the southernmost country on the mainland of the Old World or the Eastern Hemisphere. About 80 percent of South Africans are of Bantu ancestry, divided among a variety of ethnic groups speaking different African languages, nine of which have official status. The remaining population consists of Africa's largest communities of European, Asian (Indian), and multiracial (Coloured) ancestry.

Contents

Town on the Sundays River, 87 km south of Graaff-Reinet. Laid out on the farm Vergenoegd in 1854, it was proclaimed in 1855 and became a municipality in 1881. Said to have been named after General Jan Willem Janssens (1762-1838), the last Batavian Governor of the Cape. [1]

Sundays River river in South Africa

The Sundays River or Nukakamma is a river in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. It is said to be the fastest flowing river in the country. The Khoisan people originally named this river Nukakamma because the river's banks are always green and grassy despite the arid terrain that it runs through.

Graaff-Reinet Place in Eastern Cape, South Africa

Graaff-Reinet is a town in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. It is the fourth-oldest town in South Africa, after Cape Town, Stellenbosch, and Swellendam. The town was the center of a short-lived republic in the late 18th century. The town was a starting point for Great Trek groups led by Gerrit Maritz and Piet Retief and furnished large numbers of the Voortrekkers in 1835–1842.

Jan Willem Janssens Dutch noble

Jonkheer Jan Willem Janssens GCMWO was a Dutch nobleman, soldier and statesman who served both as the governor of the Cape Colony and governor-general of the Dutch East Indies.

History

In the late 1700s, outposts of the Cape Colony, in the form of the trek boer and hunters had reached and crossed the Sundays River.

The greater portion of what now constitutes the Janesville district fell under Uitenhage. The first European to settle here was Christiaan Ernst Schutte, who obtained title to land surveyed by James Swan in June 1818 described as "Late Loan Place Vergenoegd" of 3000 morgen, and granted to C.E. Schutte in 1820. Schutte was required to pay to "The Receiver General of Land Revenue" an annual quitrent of 50 Rix dollars. Schutte later sold to Prinsloo and moved northwards, to be followed by the latter when fierce, impetuous Petrus Fourie, arrived from Swellendam in 1838, to become the new owner of Vergenoegd.

His veins flowing with Huguenot industry, Fourie found the land good. The muddy waters of the Sundays spread fertile, alluvial soil along its banks. Fourie and his sons began to cultivate, and before long one hundred morgen were under crops.

The Great North tract passed over Vergenoegd. It was used by hundreds of ox wagons en route to Port Elizabeth, and returning with merchandise. The transport riders found good pasture and ample provisions in wheat, mealies and meat; the district was becoming populous.

Port Elizabeth Place in Eastern Cape, South Africa

Port Elizabeth or The Bay is one of the major cities in South Africa; it is situated in the Eastern Cape Province. The city, often shortened to PE and nicknamed "The Windy City", stretches for 16 kilometres (10 mi) along Algoa Bay, and is one of the major seaports in South Africa. Port Elizabeth is the southernmost large city on the African continent, farther south than Cape Town.

In 1853 Petrus Fourie arranged for layout and survey of about 80 erven for the establishment of a township named Alexandria in honor of Ds. Alexander Smith, NGK Minister at Uitenhage, who visited the congregation once a quarter. However, by the time the application reached the authorities at the Cape, another community near the coast had beaten Fourie to the name. Jansenville was then decided on in honor of General Janssens, last of the Dutch Governors at the Cape, and Commander of the Dutch forces at the fateful Battle of Muizenberg

In 1881 Jansenville became a municipality, and the large surrounding electoral division was named after it (returning two members to the Cape Parliament). [3]

Parliament of the Cape of Good Hope

The Parliament of the Cape of Good Hope functioned as the legislature of the Cape Colony, from its founding in 1853, until the creation of the Union of South Africa in 1910, when it was dissolved and the Parliament of South Africa was established. It consisted of the House of Assembly and the legislative council.

About

The little town of Jansenville owes its origins to the Dutch Reformed Church which formed a parish there in 1854 named after the last Dutch Governor of the Cape.

The Dutch Reformed Church was the largest Christian denomination in the Netherlands from the onset of the Protestant Reformation until 1930. It was the foremost Protestant denomination, and—since 1892—one of the two major Reformed denominations along with the Reformed Churches in the Netherlands.

Jansenville is north of the Zuurberg Mountains in an area known as the Noorsveld, after a cactus-like succulent that is common in the district. Between Jansenville and the Zuurberg to the south is a plain that marks the northern boundary of the Addo National Park, while to the north are some hills which have a scenic drive and, at the summit, shortly before the descent through the Ratelskloof Pass, there are views across the Camdeboo plains to the peaks of the Sneeuberg.[ citation needed ]

Jansenville is game country and there are game farms and hunting concessions in the area as well as nature reserves including the Addo Elephant National Park.

The town's notable buildings include the large Dutch Reformed Church, a building in the basilican style made of local stone which is a heritage site. The Anglo-Boer War fort north of the town attests to the guerrilla activity in the area in that conflict. The restored Sid Fourie House serves as a museum.

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References

  1. 1 2 "Dictionary of Southern African Place Names (Public Domain)". Human Science Research Council. p. 229.
  2. 1 2 3 4 Sum of the Main Places Jansenville and KwaZamukucinga from Census 2011.
  3. J.L McCracken: The Cape Parliament, 1854-1910. Clarendon Press, Oxford. 1967.