Jeffreys Bay

Last updated

Jeffreys Bay

Jeffreysbaai
Jeffrey's Bay Jet Ski Area & Main Beach..jpg
Jeffreys Bay Beach
South Africa Eastern Cape location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Jeffreys Bay
South Africa adm location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Jeffreys Bay
Coordinates: 34°2′S24°55′E / 34.033°S 24.917°E / -34.033; 24.917 Coordinates: 34°2′S24°55′E / 34.033°S 24.917°E / -34.033; 24.917
Country South Africa
Province Eastern Cape
District Sarah Baartman
Municipality Kouga
Area
[1]
  Total20.79 km2 (8.03 sq mi)
Population
 (2011) [1]
  Total27,107
  Density1,300/km2 (3,400/sq mi)
Racial makeup (2011)
[1]
   Black African 37.5%
   Coloured 22.7%
   Indian/Asian 0.2%
   White 38.9%
  Other0.7%
First languages (2011)
[1]
   Afrikaans 54.4%
   Xhosa 28.8%
   English 11.8%
  Other5.0%
Time zone UTC+2 (SAST)
Postal code (street)
6330
PO box
6330
Area code +27 (0)42

Jeffreys Bay (Afrikaans : Jeffreysbaai, also known as J-bay) is a town located in the Eastern Cape province of South Africa. The town is situated just off the N2 Highway, about 75 km southwest of Port Elizabeth.

Contents

History

Jeffreys Bay is named after the senior partner of the firm Jeffrey & Glendinnings that opened a store in 1849 on the location where the town is today. [2] Jeffrey is believed to be the first person to have settled there. [3]

In the late 1960s and early 1970s, Jeffreys Bay was known as a hippie hangout, where the now-burgeoning surf community originated. [4] Jeffreys Bay has grown from a sleepy little fishing town over the past few years and is one of the fastest expanding urban areas in the country. [5]

Demographics

Xhosa, Afrikaans and English are the three most spoken languages.

Jeffreys Bay is a constituent part of the Kouga Local Municipality of the Sarah Baartman District in the Eastern Cape Province.

Sport

Surfing

Jeffreys Bay is one of the five most famous surfing destinations (no.2 on one "best in the world" surfing list) in the world and hosts the annual World Surf League (WSL) surfing event at Super Tubes during July. Spectators and professional surfers from all over the world flock to this event. In 2015, Mick Fanning was attacked by a shark two minutes into the J-Bay Open finals in Jeffreys Bay. Fanning was in the water with Julian Wilson during the final of the J-Bay Open 2015 when he was attacked by what is suspected to be a great white shark. Fanning punched the shark and tried to wedge his board between the shark and his body, and he emerged from the attack physically unharmed. [6]

The Jeffreys Bay Surf Break

A very long, fast, tubing right hand point break breaks along the west side of the bay. The break is regarded as one of the best right hand point breaks in the entire world, in both consistency and quality, in season. [4] [7] [8] It has been divided up into several sections, including, from the top of the point, Kitchen Windows, Magna tubes, Boneyards, Supertubes, Impossibles, Tubes, the Point, and Albatross. [9] "Supertubes", which itself breaks for about 300m or more, is regarded as the best part of the wave. On rare occasions (large wave sizes, wide-breaking waves, and even swells), Boneyards can link up all the way to the Point for a ride over one kilometre long. Optimal size is considered to be from about 4 to 10 feet (Hawaiian scale), or about 8 to 20 feet wave faces.

The initial discovery and promotion of the wave is curious. Another nearby right hand point wave at St. Francis Bay was first idolised and promoted in the surf movie The Endless Summer in the 1960s (although both Jeffreys Bay and St. Francis Bay were probably surfed much earlier). Surfers who travelled to the area soon stumbled upon the nearby Jeffreys Bay surf break, which was found to be not only a faster, more powerful, and hollower wave, but also much more consistent. [10]

The J-Bay surf village is situated at the top of Da Gama Road. It provides a large collection of the best surf goods, clothing and more in conveniently arranged shops.

Tourism

Jeffreys Bay is a popular tourist destination because of its surfing opportunities and the Blue Flag beach. [11]

Jeffreys Bay is famous for abundant seashells, great seafood and calamari. The nearby Kabeljous, Seekoei and Krom River lagoons host numerous water birds, and are also ideal for watersports like canoeing, boardsailing, and fishing. Every year, migrating whales make their way to Hermanus and Witsand to give birth, and whales can be seen breaching almost every day during the season.

Just northeast of the town, on the Kabeljous River, lies the Kabeljous Nature Reserve. It is a walk-about reserve, well known to anglers for a diverse number of fish. The Kabeljous estuary is one of the best preserved estuaries in the Eastern Cape. The lagoon is home to waterfowl, herons, and a variety of waders. Nearby, the Seekoei River Nature Reserve lies between Aston Bay and Paradise Beach. The reserve lies on the estuary formed by the Seekoei and Swart rivers. The reserve is rich in birdlife with over 120 species of birds. The lagoon is also home to numerous red-knobbed coots and small antelope. There is also a circular hiking trail that takes about three hours to complete. The trail starts with a trip on a raft across the lagoon and runs through fynbos and subtropical vegetation.

See also

Related Research Articles

Surfing sport that consists of riding a wave

Surfing is a surface water sport in which the wave rider, referred to as a surfer, rides on the forward or face of a moving wave, which usually carries the surfer towards the shore. Waves suitable for surfing are primarily found in the ocean, but can also be found in lakes or rivers in the form of a standing wave or tidal bore. However, surfers can also utilize artificial waves such as those from boat wakes and the waves created in artificial wave pools.

Kelly Slater American surfer

Robert Kelly Slater is an American professional surfer, author, actor, model, businessman, and innovator, best known for his unprecedented 11 world surfing championships. He is widely regarded as the greatest professional surfer of all time.

Bells Beach, Victoria Town in Victoria, Australia

Bells Beach is a coastal locality of Victoria, Australia in Surf Coast Shire and a renowned surf beach, located 100 km south-west of Melbourne, on the Great Ocean Road near the towns of Torquay and Jan Juc.

Disneys Typhoon Lagoon one of two water parks at the Walt Disney World Resort in Orlando, Florida

Disney's Typhoon Lagoon is a water theme park located at the Walt Disney World Resort in Lake Buena Vista, Florida near Orlando, and is one of two operating water parks at the resort. It is the second water park to open at the resort, preceded by Disney's River Country which closed in November 2001.

Scottburgh Place in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Scottburgh is a coastal resort town located on the south coast of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. It situated on the mouth of the Mpambanyoni River (confuser of birds). Neighbouring towns include Pennington, Renishaw, Freeland Park, Umkomaas, Sezela, Bazley, Amahlongwa, Clansthal, Park Rynie and Dududu.

Mtunzini Place in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Mtunzini is a small coastal town that is situated almost exactly halfway along KwaZulu-Natal's coastline in South Africa approximately 140 km north of Durban. In 2011, the town's population was 2,199.

Torrey Pines State Beach

Torrey Pines State Beach is a coastal beach located in the San Diego, California community of Torrey Pines, and is located south of Del Mar and north of La Jolla. Coastal erosion from the adjacent Torrey Pines State Reserve makes for a picturesque landscape. It is a local favorite among surfers and remains a quintessential Southern California beach. Occurrences of bioluminescence have been noted.

Snapper Rocks

Snapper Rocks is a small rocky outcrop on the northern side of Point Danger at the southern end of Rainbow Bay on the Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia. It is a famous surf break and today the start of the large sand bank known to surfers as the Superbank.

Malibu Lagoon State Beach

Malibu Lagoon State Beach is a state protected beach of California, United States, and a unit of the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area. Also known as Surfrider Beach, it has a long-standing reputation as a premier surfing beach. Located in Malibu, California, it was dedicated as the first World Surfing Reserve on October 9, 2010. The 110-acre (45 ha) site was established as a California state park in 1951.

Peahi, Hawaii beach of Peahi, Maui Island, Hawaï, USA

Peʻahi is a place on the north shore of the island of Maui in the U.S. state of Hawaii. It has lent its name to a big wave surfing break, also known as Jaws.

Rodeo Beach

Rodeo Beach is a beach in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area located in Marin County, California, two miles north of the Golden Gate Bridge. It is characterized by a spit of around 50 meters width at the mouth of a long embayment, known as Rodeo Lagoon; for much of the year the lagoon is cut off from the ocean, making the beach spit a baymouth bar. Part of the beach is sheltered by cliffs. Rodeo Beach is known for its dark, pebbly sand, its uses for surfing and sunbathing, and its locale as a place for viewing, but not collecting, semi-precious stones. This beach is unique among California beaches in that it is largely made up of coarse, pebbly chert grains, both red and green in color. Its mineral composition sets it apart from every other beach in the state Surfing is possible throughout the year and at all tidal stages, but is best in summer — although there is a risk of shark attacks. Due to the North bar offshore of this beach it results in big waves in the winter months with the big swells that come in. Strong currents make swimming dangerous.

Ghost Tree is a famed big wave surfing location off the 18th hole of Pebble Beach Golf Links in Pebble Beach, California. The wave breaks off the rock-strewn shoreline known as Pescadero Point. On rare winter days with the proper westerly angle, waves are focused by the deep Carmel Canyon to rear up as much as 60 feet in height. Formerly known as Pesky's, Ghost Tree is considered one of the most dangerous waves in the world due to its slab shape, massive boils, strong current, bull kelp, and the underwater labyrinth of natural rock pillars in the impact zone. It is also frequented by white sharks.

Gracetown, Western Australia Town in Western Australia

Gracetown is a small town in Western Australia. It is located 269 kilometres (167 mi) south of the Perth central business district, and 21.5 kilometres (13.4 mi) north-west of the township of Margaret River in the Augusta-Margaret River Shire Council area on the coast at Cowaramup Bay.

Mick Fanning Australian surfer

Michael Eugene Fanning, nicknamed "White Lightning" is a former Australian professional surfer. Fanning won the 2007, 2009 and 2013 ASP World Tour. In 2015 he survived a shark attack with what is suspected to be a great white shark during the J-Bay Open finals in Jeffreys Bay, South Africa.

Troncones Village in Guerrero, Mexico

Troncones is a relatively undeveloped, uncrowded beach village located about 20 miles (32 km) north west of Zihuatanejo on the coast of the state of Guerrero. It is located in the municipality of La Unión de Isidoro Montes de Oca and has a population of about 593 people. Hammocks and palm trees are in most yards, chickens roam the streets and loud nightlife is limited to very few weekly events, making for quiet nights. Some local hotels and restaurants offer special events such as Movie Nights and Dance Parties, mostly during the Oct-May high season. On Sundays, El Burro Boracho has shows of Mexican folkdance.

Surf break A permanent obstruction on the seabed which causes waves to break

A surf break is a permanent obstruction such as a coral reef, rock, shoal, or headland that causes a wave to break, forming a barreling wave or other wave that can be surfed, before it eventually collapses. The topography of the seabed determines the shape of the wave and type of break. Since shoals can change size and location, affecting the break, it takes commitment and skill to find good breaks. Some surf breaks are quite dangerous, since the surfer can collide with a reef or rocks below the water.

Shipstern Bluff Tasmania, Australia

Shipstern Bluff is a globally-renowned big wave surfing location on the south eastern coast of Tasmania, Australia, on the Tasman Peninsula.

Sidi Kaouki is a small town located 25 km south of Essaouira. It is a rural commune in Essaouira Province of the Marrakech-Tensift-Al Haouz region of Morocco. At the time of the 2004 census, the commune had a total population of 4335 people living in 902 households.

Julian Wilson (surfer) Australian surfer

Julian Wilson is an Australian professional surfer who competes on the World Surf League Men's World Tour.

Surfing locations in the Capes region of South West Western Australia surfing locations between Cape Leeuwin, Western Australia and Cape Naturaliste, Western Australia

Most surf breaks in the Capes region – from Cape Naturaliste to Cape Leeuwin – within the larger area known as the South West region of Western Australia tend to have the name Margaret River attached, despite the wide geographic range of locations where the breaks are located.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 "Main Place Jeffreys Bay". Census 2011.
  2. Sellick, W.S.J. (1904). Uitenhage, past and present : souvenir of the Centenary, 1804–1904. pp.  122, 127.
  3. The Africa Pilot (1889). United Kingdom Hydrographic Office. 1889.
  4. 1 2 Marcus Sanders. "Down the line at the world's best pointbreak". Surfline. Retrieved 6 July 2008.
  5. "Integrated Development Plan (2007–2012)" (PDF). Kouga Local Municipality. p. 22. Archived from the original (PDF) on 22 November 2009. Retrieved 22 June 2009.
  6. "Mick Fanning speaks of 'miracle' survival after arriving back in Sydney following shark attack". ABC. Retrieved 21 July 2015.
  7. Ben Marcus (SurferMag.com Correspondent) (30 June 2008). "A Revisionist Glance at Historic Surfing Locales: J Bay". Surfer Magazine. Archived from the original on 22 November 2008. Retrieved 6 July 2008.
  8. "Surfing's Meccas". Transworld Surf. 14 October 2005. Archived from the original on 22 December 2005. Retrieved 5 July 2008.
  9. "The Wave". Archived from the original on 4 August 2008. Retrieved 6 July 2008.
  10. Laurence Platt (10 August 2003). "The Original Jeffrey's Bay". Conversations For Transformation. Retrieved 10 August 2003.
  11. "Blue flag beaches – Dolphin Beach, Jeffreys Bay". Blueflag.org. Archived from the original on 7 November 2007. Retrieved 5 July 2008.