Kings in the Corner

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Kings in the Corner, or King's Corners is a multi-player solitaire-style card game using one deck of standard playing cards with between two and four players participating.

Contents

Rules

A Kings in the Corner game in progress Kings in the Corner card game.jpg
A Kings in the Corner game in progress

Each player is dealt seven cards from the top of the deck. A gameplay "board" is then set up on the playing surface. Four cards are laid down, face-up, in a cross pattern, with the remainder of the deck face down in the middle. In this fashion there should be a card north, south, east and west of the deck with empty spaces in the "corners".

The player who takes the first turn is determined by each player drawing a random card from the deck; the player with the highest draw takes the first turn. If you are playing with two players, whoever did not deal the cards will go first. Alternatively, the person to the left of the dealer starts.

On their turn, a player may perform any number of the following moves in any order.

  1. attempting to discard from their hand by playing their cards in descending numerical order in a suit of the opposite color using the "foundation" cards as a starting point. For instance, if there is a four of clubs sitting on the playing board, a player can take a three of diamonds or hearts from their hand and discard it onto that four. Players can continue playing as many cards from their hand as are eligible for play in this fashion.
  2. If at any time a player has a King in their hand they have to (during their turn) place it in one of the empty corners (thus the origin of the game's name.) These corner stacks now become active in gameplay and cards can be played on them during turns in the same fashion as the normal game board.
  3. Move an entire foundation pile onto another foundation pile if the bottom card of the moving pile is one rank lower and opposite in color to the top card of the pile you are moving it onto.
  4. Play any card from your hand to any of the original (N, E, S, W) foundation piles that have become empty (because the card(s) that were originally in it have been moved to another pile).

If a player has already laid down a card, then it becomes part of the playing board and can not be picked up even if the players turn is not over. At the end of the player's turn, they draw a card from the stock. [1] If a player cannot play any cards in their hand (or does not wish to), they must draw from the stock/deck and end their turn, or in an alternate version, draw until they find a card that can be played, play it and then end their turn with another draw.

The first player to play all of his or her cards onto the board is the winner. A variation involves a player collecting each corner that they complete, whereby the winner is determined to be the player that owns the most corners by the end of play.

Notes

  1. "Rules of Card Games: Kings Corners". Pagat.com. 2008-01-23. Retrieved 2013-08-15.

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