Mau-Mau (card game)

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Mau-Mau
Berlin Pattern Pack - Jack of Diamonds - IMG 7713.jpg
If a player's final card is a Jack, they must call "Mau Mau"
TypeShedding-type
FamilyFirst-out wins
Players2–5
Skills required Tactics, communication
Age range6+
Cards32 or 36
Deck French or German pack
PlayClockwise
Card rank (highest first)A K Q J 10 9 8 7
A K O U 10 9 8 7
A H V B 10 9 8 7
Playing timeVarious
Random chanceMedium
Related games
Switch, Crazy Eights

Mau-Mau is a card game for 2 to 5 players that is popular in Germany, Austria, Serbia, South Tyrol, the United States, Brazil, Poland, Greece, Czech Republic, Slovakia and the Netherlands. Mau-Mau is a member of the larger Crazy Eights or shedding family, to which the proprietary card game Uno belongs. However Mau-Mau is played with standard French or German-suited playing cards.

Contents

History

Rules for Mau have existed at least since the 1930s. The game originated in Germany.

Rules

The game is typically played with a 32-card pack, either a French-suited pack from which the Twos, Threes, Fours, Fives and Sixes have been removed or, especially in Europe, with a 32-card German pack. For more than 5 players, 2 packs of cards may be used.

The aim is to be first to get rid of all of one's cards. Most of the time, the winner will have to say something at this point, usually "Mau". If they fail to say this, they do not win and instead must take penalty cards. If a player's last card is a Jack, they must reply differently, usually saying "Mau Mau".

Before the start of the game, a player who is not the dealer cuts the deck 4 times. If they cut 1-3 significant cards, they are allowed to keep them if they want. However, if four cards where the cards are cut are found to be power cards, the deck needs to be reshuffled and the cut is repeated. [1] The players are each dealt a hand of cards (usually 5 or 6). [2] The rest are placed face down as the stock or stack. At the beginning of the game the topmost card is revealed and placed face up on the table then the players take it in turns to play their cards.

A card can only be played if it corresponds to the suit or value of the face-up card. E.g. if it is the 10 of spades, only another spade or another 10 can be played (but see below for Jacks). If a player is not able to do this, they draw one card from the stack; If they can play this card, they may do so; otherwise, they keep the drawn card and passes on their turn. When the drawing stack is empty, the playing stack (except for the topmost card) is shuffled and turned over to serve as a new drawing stack.

The 7, 8, Jack, and Ace of all suits are significant cards:


Variants

Austria and Bavaria

In Austria and Bavaria a variation is the 32-card game known as Neuner ("Nines") in which a Joker is added and the Nines are used as wild cards. [3]

Czech Republic

The most popular variant of this game in Czech Republic is called Prší (raining in Czech language). [4] It is played with deck of 32 German cards (four card suits, values from 7 to Ace) and has almost identical rules with several differences:

Some may play with less common modifications:

Variation: Quick

Player can play multiple cards at once if these requirements apply:

  • Played cards have same rank
  • The bottom one can by played according to already known rules

When dealing with power cards usually all act as if there was only one of them but sevens in which case the next player has to draw 2 times number of played sevens or play another seven. (When playing the variation with 10 of hearts being power card all sorts of rules are being implemented by each player group, let alone of multiple decks are involved)

Be warned. With some combination of homebrew rules and 5 or more players it is possible that somebody has to draw more cards than there is on the table in total (excluding other players hands). If that happens too often during your games it is adviced to add more decks to the game and/or decrease the penalties of power cards.

Variation: Blind

Players play cards in following manner. "Face-up card" is always played face down and it's rank and suit is verbally specified by the player. If the next player believes him/her it is accepted as "canon" and game continues. If the next player doesn't believe the card is revealed and if the first player told the truth the next player is penalized (has to draw a card or more or doesn't play that round or ...) if the first player lied the first player is penalized (usually takes the card back to his hand and is skipped, draw additional one or both or ...)

Netherlands

In the Netherlands Mau-Mau is mainly known as Pesten (meaning bullying). It is played with a deck of 54 or 55 cards (52 standard plus two or three jokers); multiple decks may be shuffled together if there are too many players to comfortably play with only one deck. The main differences with Mau-Mau are as follows, though there is typically some variation in the rules depending on the group of players.

Portugal

In Portugal, a variation on this game is called Puque. The rules are almost the same, with the 2 replacing the 8 as the "skip turn" card. A player must say Puque when playing their next-to-last card, and doesn't have to say anything different from end with a Jack,[ clarification needed ] still getting the double score.

Russia

Variants are called Чешский Дурак (Czech Fool), Фараон (Pharaoh), Крокодил (Crocodile) or 101. Usually played with 36-card, French pack. The rules are similar to Czech and Slovak rules.

Slovakia

In Slovakia the game is called Faraón (Pharaoh). It is the same as in the Czech Republic with the following exceptions:

Switzerland

A Swiss version of the game called Tschau Sepp, played with 36 cards, has existed at least since the early 1960s.

See also

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. "The Mau Mau Club card game rules". Mau Mau Club. Retrieved 2019-01-29.
  2. "Opening card rules". Mau King.
  3. 1 2 Parlett 2008, p. 447.
  4. Omasta, Vojtěch; Ravik, Slavomír (1969). Hráčy Karty: Karetní Hri (in Czech). Prague: Práce. p. 284. OCLC   42157300.[ verification needed ]

Further reading