Kingston upon Hull East (UK Parliament constituency)

Last updated

Kingston upon Hull East
Borough constituency
for the House of Commons
KingstonUponHullEast2007Constituency.svg
Boundary of Kingston upon Hull East in Humberside
EnglandHumberside.svg
Location of Humberside within England
County East Riding of Yorkshire
Electorate 65,116 (December 2019) [1]
Current constituency
Created 1885
Member of Parliament Karl Turner (Labour)
Number of membersOne
Created from Kingston upon Hull

Kingston upon Hull East is a borough constituency for the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It elects one Member of Parliament (MP) at least once every five years by the first-past-the-post electoral system. The constituency has been represented by Karl Turner of the Labour Party since the 2010 general election.

Contents

Boundaries

Kingston upon Hull East (UK Parliament constituency)
Map of present boundaries

1885–1918: The Municipal Borough of Hull wards of Alexandra, Beverley, Drypool, Sutton, and part of Central.[ citation needed ]

1918–1950: The County Borough of Hull wards of Alexandra, Drypool, and Southcoates.[ citation needed ]

1950–1955: The County Borough of Hull wards of Alexandra, Drypool, Marfleet, Southcoates, Stoneferry, and Sutton.[ citation needed ]

1955–1974: The County Borough of Hull wards of Alexandra, Drypool, East Central, Marfleet, Myton, Southcoates, Stoneferry, and Sutton.[ citation needed ]

1974–1983: The County Borough of Hull wards of Bransholme, Drypool, Greatfield, Holderness, Longhill, Marfleet, Stoneferry, and Sutton.[ citation needed ]

1983–2010: The City of Hull wards of Drypool, Holderness, Ings, Longhill, Marfleet, Southcoates, and Sutton.[ citation needed ]

2010–present: The City of Hull wards of Drypool, Holderness, Ings, Longhill, Marfleet, Southcoates East, Southcoates West, and Sutton. [2]

Constituency profile

The constituency covers most of the city of Kingston upon Hull east of the River Hull, excluding the Bransholme estate which lies in the Kingston upon Hull North constituency. It is a constituency of diversity, divided by Holderness Road, it can be split into two very separate areas. It includes the now-redeveloped residential Victoria Docks, which can be considered alongside Sutton Village, Garden Village and the private housing suburbs to the north of East Park. Away from the prestigious dockside developments and middle-class suburbs, the southern area of the constituency is largely social housing with a large amount of unemployment and underemployment [3] alongside the vast docks and industrial estates.[ citation needed ]

History

In the early years of the constituency, it continually changed hands between the Conservative Party and the then-Liberal Party. Kingston upon Hull East has returned Labour MPs since 1935, and from 1945 to 2010 was represented by only two members, former seamen, Harry Pursey and John Prescott (who became Deputy Prime Minister, at the time in charge of town and country planning policy).[ citation needed ]

Members of Parliament

ElectionMember [4] Party
1885 William Saunders Liberal
1886 Frederick Brent Grotrian Conservative
1892 Clarence Smith Liberal
1895 Thomas Firbank Conservative
1906 Thomas Ferens Liberal
1918 Charles Murchison Conservative
1922 Roger Lumley Conservative
1929 George Muff Labour
1931 John Nation Conservative
1935 George Muff Labour
1945 Harry Pursey Labour
1970 John Prescott Labour
2010 Karl Turner Labour

Elections

Elections in the 2010s

2019 general election: Kingston upon Hull East [5]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Karl Turner 12,713 39.2 −19.1
Conservative Rachel Storer11,47435.4+5.5
Brexit Party Marten Hall5,76417.8New
Liberal Democrats Bob Morgan1,7075.3+1.9
Green Julia Brown7842.4+1.1
Majority1,2393.8−24.6
Rejected ballots540
Turnout 32,44249.3−6.2
Registered electors 65,745
Labour hold Swing −12.3

The turnout of 49.3% in Kingston upon Hull East was the lowest in any constituency in the United Kingdom at the 2019 general election, and was the only example of a seat where fewer than half of the eligible electorate voted. [6] It was also the seat with the lowest number of votes for a winning candidate in England.

2017 general election: Kingston upon Hull East [7]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Karl Turner 21,355 58.3 +6.6
Conservative Simon Burton10,95929.9+14.0
UKIP Mark Fox2,5737.0−15.4
Liberal Democrats Andrew Marchington1,2583.4−3.1
Green Julia Brown4931.3−1.0
Majority10,39628.4−0.9
Turnout 36,63855.5+2.0
Registered electors 65,959
Labour hold Swing
2015 general election: Kingston upon Hull East [8]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Karl Turner 18,180 51.7 +3.8
UKIP Richard Barrett7,86122.4+14.4
Conservative Christine Mackay5,59315.9−0.7
Liberal Democrats David Nolan2,2946.5−16.3
Green Sarah Walpole8062.3New
Yorkshire First Martin Clayton2700.8New
National Front Mike Cooper860.2−2.4
SDP Val Hoodless540.2New
Majority10,31929.3+4.2
Turnout 35,14453.5+2.9
Registered electors 65,710
Labour hold Swing
2010 general election: Kingston upon Hull East [9]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Karl Turner 16,387 47.9 −8.9
Liberal Democrats Jeremy Wilcock7,79022.8+3.9
Conservative Christine Mackay5,66716.6+3.6
UKIP Mike Hookem 2,7458.0New
National Front Joe Uttley8802.6New
English Democrat Michael Burton7152.1New
Majority8,59725.1−12.8
Turnout 34,18450.6+3.2
Registered electors 67,530
Labour hold Swing −6.4

Elections in the 2000s

2005 general election: Kingston upon Hull East [10]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour John Prescott 17,609 56.8 −7.8
Liberal Democrats Andy Sloan5,86218.9+4.0
Conservative Katy Lindsay4,03813.0−0.8
BNP Alan Siddle1,0223.3New
Liberal Janet Toker1,0183.3New
Veritas Graham Morris7502.4New
Independent Roland Noon3341.1New
Socialist Labour Linda Muir2070.7−2.0
Legalise Cannabis Carl Wagner1820.6New
Majority11,74737.9-11.8
Turnout 31,02247.4+1.0
Labour hold Swing -5.9
2001 general election: Kingston upon Hull East [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour John Prescott 19,938 64.6 −6.7
Liberal Democrats Jo Swinson 4,61314.9+5.1
Conservative Sandip Verma 4,27613.8+0.1
UKIP Jeanette Jenkinson1,2183.9New
Socialist Labour Linda Muir8302.7New
Majority15,32549.7−7.9
Turnout 30,87546.4−12.5
Labour hold Swing

Elections in the 1990s

1997 general election: Kingston upon Hull East [12] [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour John Prescott 28,87071.3+8.4
Conservative Angus West5,55213.7-10.1
Liberal Democrats Jim Wastling3,9659.8-2.8
Referendum Gordon Rogers1,7884.4New
ProLife Alliance Margaret Nolan1900.5New
Natural Law David Whitley1210.3-0.4
Majority23,31857.6+18.5
Turnout 40,48658.9-10.4
Labour hold Swing +9.2
1992 general election: Kingston upon Hull East [14] [15]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour John Prescott 30,096 62.9 +6.6
Conservative John L. Fareham11,37323.8−2.2
Liberal Democrats James H. Wastling6,05012.6−5.1
Natural Law Cliff Kinzell3230.7New
Majority18,72339.1+8.8
Turnout 47,84269.3−1.3
Labour hold Swing +4.4

Elections in the 1980s

1987 general election: Kingston upon Hull East [16]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour John Prescott 27,28756.31
Conservative Philip Jackson12,59826.00
Liberal T. Wright8,57217.69
Majority14,68930.31
Turnout 48,45770.58
Labour hold Swing
1983 general election: Kingston upon Hull East [17]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour John Prescott 23,61549.90
Conservative D. Leng13,54128.61
Liberal C. Grurevitch10,17221.49
Majority10,07421.29
Turnout 47,32867.58
Labour hold Swing

Elections in the 1970s

1979 general election: Kingston upon Hull East[ citation needed ]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour John Prescott 39,41162.51
Conservative M. M. B. Bean15,71924.93
Liberal M. J. Horne7,54311.96
National Front D. J. Matson3740.59New
Majority23,69237.58
Turnout 63,04770.82
Labour hold Swing
October 1974 general election: Kingston upon Hull East[ citation needed ]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour John Prescott 34,19062.41
Conservative Stephen Dorrell 10,39718.98
Liberal J. Adamson10,19618.61New
Majority23,79343.43
Turnout 54,78367.12
Labour hold Swing
February 1974 general election: Kingston upon Hull East[ citation needed ]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour John Prescott 41,30069.99
Conservative E. D. M. Todd17,70730.01
Majority23,59339.98
Turnout 59,00773.14
Labour hold Swing
1970 general election: Kingston upon Hull East[ citation needed ]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour John Prescott 36,85971.44
Conservative Norman Lamont 14,73628.56
Majority22,12342.88
Turnout 51,59568.18
Labour hold Swing

Elections in the 1960s

1966 general election: Kingston upon Hull East[ citation needed ]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Harry Pursey 34,45765.46
Conservative Maude Heath11,38521.63
Liberal Norman W. Turner6,79512.91
Majority23,07243.83
Turnout 52,63773.42
Labour hold Swing
1964 general election: Kingston upon Hull East[ citation needed ]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Harry Pursey 30,63456.00
Conservative Maude Heath13,28426.11
Liberal Norman W. Turner9,78117.88
Majority16,35029.89
Turnout 53,69974.78
Labour hold Swing

Elections in the 1950s

1959 general election: Kingston upon Hull East[ citation needed ]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Harry Pursey 30,66752.55
Conservative Maude Heath17,64830.24
Liberal John J. MacCallum10,04317.21
Majority13,01922.31
Turnout 58,35880.56
Labour hold Swing
1955 general election: Kingston upon Hull East[ citation needed ]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Harry Pursey 28,99055.20
Conservative Harry Richman16,28431.01
Liberal John J. MacCallum7,24213.79
Majority12,70624.19
Turnout 52,51675.66
Labour hold Swing
1951 general election: Kingston upon Hull East[ citation needed ]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Harry Pursey 27,89257.07
Conservative Harry Richman16,36833.49
Liberal Ronald W. Sykes4,6119.44
Majority11,52423.58
Turnout 48,87184.22
Labour hold Swing
1950 general election: Kingston upon Hull East[ citation needed ]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Harry Pursey 26,90356.20
Conservative William John Cornelis Heyting13,98829.22
Liberal Thomas Ernest Dalton6,98114.58
Majority12,91526.98
Turnout 47,87285.28
Labour hold Swing

Election in the 1940s

1945 general election: Kingston upon Hull East[ citation needed ]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Harry Pursey 19,44364.25
Conservative Rupert Alec-Smith 7,43924.58
Liberal Albert Edward Marshall3,37911.17
Majority12,00439.67
Turnout 30,26175.61
Labour hold Swing

Elections in the 1930s

1935 general election: Kingston upon Hull East[ citation needed ]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour George Muff 19,05449.32
Conservative John Nation 15,44839.98
Liberal Rodway Stephens4,13310.70New
Majority3,6069.33N/A
Turnout 38,61575.63
Labour gain from Conservative Swing
1931 general election: Kingston upon Hull East[ citation needed ]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative John Nation 24,00357.11
Labour George Muff 18,02642.89
Majority5,97714.22N/A
Turnout 42,02983.24
Conservative gain from Labour Swing

Elections in the 1920s

1929 general election: Kingston upon Hull East [18]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour George Muff 20,023 48.8 +10.4
Unionist Roger Lumley 13,81033.6−8.8
Liberal Rodway Stephens7,21717.6−0.1
Majority6,21315.2N/A
Turnout 41,05083.4+1.6
Registered electors 49,212
Labour gain from Unionist Swing +9.6
1924 general election: Kingston upon Hull East [18]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Unionist Roger Lumley 12,296 42.4 +3.9
Labour George Muff 11,13038.4+11.5
Liberal F. C. Thornborough5,14017.7−16.9
Independent W. E. Mashford4441.5New
Majority1,1664.0+0.1
Turnout 29,01081.8+2.4
Registered electors 35,467
Unionist hold Swing −3.8
C.J.Vasey Charles James Vasey.jpg
C.J.Vasey
1923 general election: Kingston upon Hull East [18]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Unionist Roger Lumley 10,657 38.5 −5.4
Liberal Charles Vasey9,60034.6+3.4
Labour Archibald Stark7,46826.9+2.0
Majority1,0573.9−8.8
Turnout 27,72579.4−3.1
Registered electors 34,908
Unionist hold Swing −4.4
1922 general election: Kingston upon Hull East [19]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Unionist Roger Lumley 12,248 43.9 −8.6
Liberal Charles Vasey8,71131.2+4.1
Labour Archibald Stark6,93424.9+4.5
Majority3,53712.7−12.7
Turnout 27,89382.5+24.3
Registered electors 33,795
Unionist hold Swing −6.9

Elections in the 1910s

1918 general election: Kingston upon Hull East [19]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
C Unionist Charles Murchison 9,56652.5+9.7
Liberal Thomas Ferens 4,94727.1−30.1
Labour R. H. Farrah 3,72520.4New
Majority4,61925.4N/A
Turnout 18,23858.2−27.5
Registered electors 31,316
Unionist gain from Liberal Swing +19.9
Cindicates candidate endorsed by the coalition government.
December 1910 general election: Kingston upon Hull East [20]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Thomas Ferens 7,196 57.2 −0.4
Conservative R. M. Sebag-Montefiore5,38742.8+0.4
Majority1,80914.4−0.8
Turnout 12,58385.7−4.4
Registered electors 14,687
Liberal hold Swing −0.4
January 1910 general election: Kingston upon Hull East [20]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Thomas Ferens 7,627 57.6 −2.8
Conservative R. M. Sebag-Montefiore5,61142.4+2.8
Majority2,01615.2−5.6
Turnout 13,23890.1+2.9
Registered electors 14,687
Liberal hold Swing −2.8

Elections in the 1900s

1906 general election: Kingston upon Hull East [20]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Thomas Ferens 6,881 60.4 +14.7
Conservative L. R. Davies4,51939.6−14.7
Majority2,36220.8N/A
Turnout 11,40087.2+6.9
Registered electors 13,073
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +14.7
1900 general election: Kingston upon Hull East [20]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Thomas Firbank 5,264 54.3 +3.4
Liberal Thomas Ferens 4,42845.7−3.4
Majority8368.6+6.8
Turnout 9,69280.3−0.9
Registered electors 12,066
Conservative hold Swing +3.4

Elections in the 1890s

1895 general election: Kingston upon Hull East [20]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Thomas Firbank 4,305 50.9 +5.9
Liberal Clarence Smith 4,15249.1−5.9
Majority1531.8N/A
Turnout 8,45781.2−4.7
Registered electors 10,419
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +5.9
1892 general election: Kingston upon Hull East [20]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Clarence Smith 4,570 55.0 +5.3
Conservative Frederick Brent Grotrian 3,73845.0−5.3
Majority83210.0N/A
Turnout 8,30885.9+8.4
Registered electors 9,677
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +5.3

Elections in the 1880s

1886 general election: Kingston upon Hull East [20]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Frederick Brent Grotrian 3,139 50.3 +5.3
Liberal William Saunders 3,10249.7−5.3
Majority370.6N/A
Turnout 6,24177.5−4.3
Registered electors 8,053
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +5.3
1885 general election: Kingston upon Hull East [20]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal William Saunders 3,625 55.0
Conservative Frederick Brent Grotrian 2,96045.0
Majority66510.0
Turnout 6,58581.8
Registered electors 8,053
Liberal win (new seat)

See also

Related Research Articles

Rushcliffe (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1885 onwards

Rushcliffe is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament from 2019 by Ruth Edwards, a Conservative.

Beverley and Holderness (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom

Beverley and Holderness is a county constituency for the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It elects one Member of Parliament (MP) at least once every five years by the first-past-the-post electoral system. The constituency has been represented by Graham Stuart of the Conservative Party since the 2005 general election.

Kingston upon Hull West and Hessle (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom

Kingston upon Hull West and Hessle is a borough constituency for the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It elects one Member of Parliament (MP) at least once every five years by the first-past-the-post electoral system. The constituency has been represented by Emma Hardy of the Labour Party since the 2017 general election.

Leeds East (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom

Leeds East is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2015 by Richard Burgon of the Labour Party.

Kingston upon Hull North (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom

Kingston upon Hull North is a borough constituency for the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It elects one Member of Parliament (MP) at least once every five years by the first-past-the-post electoral system. The constituency has been represented by Diana Johnson of the Labour Party since the 2005 general election.

Lewisham West (UK Parliament constituency)

Lewisham West was a borough constituency in south-east London represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It elected one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election from 1918, until it was abolished for the 2010 general election.

Kingston and Surbiton (UK Parliament constituency)

Kingston and Surbiton is a constituency created in 1997 represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2017 by Ed Davey, the Leader of the Liberal Democrats. Kingston and Surbiton has been considered relative to others a very marginal seat, as well as a swing seat since 2010, as the seat has changed hands twice since that year, and its winner's majority did not exceed 6.6% of the vote since the 13.2% majority won in 2010 prior to 2019, when Davey won a 17.2% majority and a majority of the votes cast.

Richmond Park (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom

Richmond Park is a parliamentary constituency in the House of Commons of the United Kingdom. Sarah Olney of the Liberal Democrats won the seat at a by-election in 2016 after Zac Goldsmith of the Conservative Party stood down in protest over expansion of Heathrow Airport. Goldsmith stood as an independent at the by-election, but the Conservative whip was restored for the 2017 general election, where he regained the seat with a slim majority. Olney won the seat from Goldsmith a second time at the 2019 general election.

Sutton and Cheam (UK Parliament constituency)

Sutton and Cheam is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2015 by Paul Scully, a Conservative.

Plymouth Sutton (UK Parliament constituency)

Plymouth, Sutton was, from 1918 until 2010, a borough constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It elected one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election.

Kingston upon Hull West (UK Parliament constituency)

Kingston upon Hull West was a borough constituency in Kingston upon Hull which returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1885 until it was abolished for the 1918 general election.

Surbiton was a borough constituency created for the 1955 general election and abolished for the 1997 general election, in Surrey until 1965 and thereafter in outer south-west London. It returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom by the first past the post system of election.

Plymouth Drake (UK Parliament constituency)

Plymouth Drake was a borough constituency in the city of Plymouth, in Devon. It elected one Member of Parliament to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom by the first past the post system of election.

Drypool Area of Kingston upon Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire, England

Drypool is an area within the city of Kingston upon Hull, England.

Marfleet is an area of Kingston upon Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire, England, in the east of the city, near King George Dock.

2012 Hull City Council election

The 2012 Hull City Council election took place on 3 May 2012 to elect members of Hull City Council in England. This was held on the same day as other 2012 United Kingdom local elections. One third of the council was up for election and Labour retained control of the council with an increased majority.

2011 Hull City Council election

The 2011 Hull City Council election took place on 5 May 2011 to elect members of Hull City Council in England. One third of the council was up for election and Labour gained control of the council from the Liberal Democrats.

2010 Hull City Council election

The 2010 Hull City Council election took place on 6 May 2010 to elect members of Hull City Council in England. One third of the council was up for election and Liberal Democrats retained control of the council.

References

  1. "Constituency data: electorates – House of Commons Library". Parliament UK. 15 June 2020. Retrieved 22 July 2020.
  2. Text of the Parliamentary Constituencies (England) Order 2007 as originally enacted or made within the United Kingdom, from legislation.gov.uk . Retrieved 26 November 2019.
  3. 2011 census interactive maps Archived 29 January 2016 at the Wayback Machine
  4. Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "H" (part 4)
  5. "Hull East". BBC News. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  6. Colin Rallings; Michael Thrasher (2020). "Statistical Analysis: Labour's Struggle". The Times Guide to the House of Commons 2019. Glasgow: Times Books. p. 37. ISBN   978-0-00-839258-1.
  7. "Kingston upon Hull East – 2017 Election Results". General Elections Online. Parliament of the United Kingdom. Retrieved 24 November 2019.
  8. "Kingston upon Hull East – 2015 Election Results". General Elections Online. Parliament of the United Kingdom. Retrieved 24 November 2019.
  9. "Kingston upon Hull East – 2010 Election Results". General Elections Online. Parliament of the United Kingdom. Retrieved 24 November 2019.
  10. "Election Data 2005". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  11. "Election Data 2001". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  12. "Election Data 1997". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  13. "Hull East". The Guardian. Retrieved 22 November 2013.
  14. "Election Data 1992". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  15. "Politics Resources". Election 1992. Politics Resources. 9 April 1992. Archived from the original on 24 July 2011. Retrieved 6 December 2010.
  16. "Election Data 1987". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  17. "Election Data 1983". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  18. 1 2 3 British Parliamentary Election Results 1918–1949, FWS Craig
  19. 1 2 British Parliamentary Election Results 1918–1949, F W S Craig
  20. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Craig, FWS, ed. (1974). British Parliamentary Election Results: 1885–1918. London: Macmillan Press. ISBN   9781349022984.

Coordinates: 53°46′01″N0°17′13″W / 53.767°N 0.287°W / 53.767; -0.287