Sheffield Hallam (UK Parliament constituency)

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Coordinates: 53°21′18″N1°31′23″W / 53.355°N 1.523°W / 53.355; -1.523

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Sheffield, Hallam
County constituency
for the House of Commons
SheffieldHallam2007Constituency.svg
Boundary of Sheffield, Hallam in South Yorkshire
EnglandSouthYorkshire.svg
Location of South Yorkshire within England
County South Yorkshire
Population84,912 [1]
Electorate 69,323 (December 2019) [2]
Current constituency
Created 1885
Member of Parliament Olivia Blake (Labour)
Created from Sheffield

Sheffield Hallam is a constituency [n 1] represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2019 by Olivia Blake of the Labour Party. [n 2]

The Hallam seat was previously held by Nick Clegg, the former Leader of the Liberal Democrats and Deputy Prime Minister of the United Kingdom until he was unseated by Labour in 2017.

Constituency profile

It has returned a Labour MP for the first time since its first election in 1885 and, apart from a brief period between 1916 and 1918, was held by the Conservatives from 1885 until 1997, when the Liberal Democrats won it. This long period of Conservative dominance included all 3 elections under Margaret Thatcher's premiership, starkly contrasting with the consensus within most seats in the county and the other county which Sheffield Hallam borders, Derbyshire.

On income-based 2004 statistics, this is the most affluent constituency one place below the top ten seats of the 650, which were spread across the South East of England (including London), with almost 12% of residents earning over £60,000 a year. [3] This measure placed Sheffield Hallam above Windsor and Twickenham.

Based on 2011–12 income and tax statistics from HMRC, [4] Sheffield Hallam has the 70th highest median income of the 650 parliamentary constituencies, with those above it almost exclusively in London and the South East, and placing it above Tunbridge Wells (76th), The Cotswolds (92nd), Cambridge (97th), Hemel Hempstead (103rd), and David Cameron's former Witney constituency (121st).

The 2001 Census showed Hallam to have the highest number of people classified as professionals of any of the UK constituencies. [5] Furthermore, 60% of working-age residents hold a degree, [6] 7th highest and exceeding Cambridge. [n 3]

Before the 1997 general election, the constituency was a safe Conservative seat, and was the only Conservative seat in South Yorkshire in the three previous elections to that. From 2005 to 2017, it was represented in the House of Commons by Nick Clegg, who was leader of the Liberal Democrats from 2007 to 2015 and Deputy Prime Minister from 2010 to 2015.

Hallam constituency extends from Stannington and Loxley in the north to Dore in the south and includes small parts of the city centre in the east. It includes the wards of Crookes, Dore and Totley, Ecclesall, Fulwood and Stannington.

The majority of Hallam is rural, spreading in the west into the Peak District National Park. It also contains some of the least deprived wards in the country, has low unemployment (1.5% jobseekers claimants in November 2012) [7] and a high rate of owner occupancy with few occupants who rent their home. [8] Since the 2010 boundary changes, neither of Sheffield's universities have a campus in the constituency [9] but it still includes areas where many students live.[ citation needed ]

In the 2017 general election, the Labour party candidate, Jared O'Mara, won the seat from Clegg. [10] This was the first time in the seat's history that it has returned a Labour MP.

From 25 October 2017 until 3 July 2018, O'Mara had the whip withdrawn as a Labour MP and sat as an independent. It was later restored but he quit the Labour Party shortly afterwards. [11] He then sat as an independent MP until leaving parliament. [12] O'Mara announced he would resign as an MP in September 2019, citing mental health issues, which would have triggered a by-election in the constituency. [13] However, he later postponed his resignation until the 2019 general election. [14]

Olivia Blake won the seat for the Labour party in the 2019 general election in a narrowly fought contest.

In her maiden speech to Parliament, Olivia Blake said that the Sheffield Hallam constituency had a "very long history of social justice", as mythology points to a Yorkshire origin for Robin Hood in Loxley, thereby lending her support to the idea that Loxley was the birthplace of Robin Hood. [15]

Boundaries

1885–1918: The Borough of Sheffield wards of Nether and Upper Hallam, and parts of the wards of Ecclesall and St George's.

1918–1950: The County Borough of Sheffield wards of Crookesmoor and Hallam, and part of Broomhill ward.

1950–1955: The County Borough of Sheffield wards of Broomhill, Ecclesall, and Hallam.

1955–1974: The County Borough of Sheffield wards of Broomhill, Crookesmoor, Ecclesall, and Hallam.

1974–1983: The County Borough of Sheffield wards of Broomhill, Dore, Ecclesall, Hallam, and Nether Edge.

1983–1997: The City of Sheffield wards of Broomhill, Dore, Ecclesall, Hallam, and Nether Edge.

1997–2010: The City of Sheffield wards of Broomhill, Dore, Ecclesall, and Hallam.

2010–present: The City of Sheffield wards of Crookes, Dore and Totley, Ecclesall, Fulwood, and Stannington.

Hallam [n 4] borders High Peak, North East Derbyshire, Penistone and Stocksbridge, Sheffield Central, Sheffield Heeley and Sheffield Brightside and Hillsborough.

History

Prior to its creation Hallam was a part of the larger Sheffield Borough constituency, which was represented by two Members of Parliament (MPs). In 1885 the Redistribution of Seats Act, which sought to eliminate constituencies with more than one MP and for the first time allow approximately equal representation of the people, led to the break-up of the constituency into five divisions: each represented by a single MP, as today. Hallam was one of these new divisions. Its first MP, the Conservative Charles Stuart-Wortley, had previously been an MP in the Sheffield constituency, elected for the first time in 1880.

Hallam was regarded in 2004 as the wealthiest constituency in the north of England [3] and was held by the Conservative Party for all but two years from 1885 to 1997. At the 1997 general election Richard Allan of the Liberal Democrats took the seat with an 18.5% swing, becoming only the second non-Tory ever to win it. He handed the seat to fellow Lib Dem Nick Clegg in 2005, who held it until his defeat by Labour's Jared O'Mara in the 2017 general election. That year saw the constituency record its highest turnout since 1951, with 77.8% of voters going to the polls.

Constituency polls during the 2010–2015 Parliament

Due in part to the high profile of the constituency's then-MP Nick Clegg, who served as Deputy Prime Minister during the 2010–15 Parliament, Sheffield Hallam is unusual in having had seven constituency-specific opinion polls conducted between 2010 and 2015. Each of these polls suggested significant changes in the vote share compared to 2010 general election. The first poll, in October 2010, suggested a drop in the Lib Dem lead in the seat to just 2%, from nearly 30% at the general election five months earlier. Five of the six remaining polls, which appeared between May 2014 and May 2015, suggested that Labour was in the lead in the seat by this time, with the Labour lead fluctuating to between 1% and 10%, and one put the Lib Dems in the lead. On average across all seven opinion polls, Labour had a lead over the Lib Dems of 2.5%. The Conservatives came second in one poll, and third in the other six polls. The May 2015 ICM poll scores displayed are those of the constituency voting intention question. The same poll also carried the standard voting intention question, which showed a Labour lead. [16] [17] [18] [19] [20] [21] [22]

Date(s)
conducted
Polling organisation/clientSample size Lab Con LD UKIP Green Others Lead
8 June 2017 General Election 2017 [23] 57,02038.4%23.8%34.7%1.6%1.4%0.1%3.8% over LD
7 May 2015 General Election 2015 55,48135.8%13.6%40.0%6.4%3.2%0.9%4.2% over Lab
1–3 May 2015 ICM/Guardian 50135%12%42%7%3%2%7% over Lab
22–28 Apr 2015 Lord Ashcroft 1,00037%15%36%7%4%1%1% over LD
22–28 Mar 2015 Lord Ashcroft 1,00136%16%34%7%6%1%2% over LD
22–29 Jan 2015 Survation/Unite 1,01133%22%23%9%12%<0.5%10% over LD
20–22 Nov 2014 Survation/Lord Ashcroft 96230%19%27% [24] 13%10%1%3% over LD
29 Apr–4 May 2014 ICM/Lord Oakeshott 50033%24%23%10%8%1%9% over Con
1–4 Oct 2010 Populus/Lord Ashcroft 1,00031%28%33%N/AN/A8%2% over Lab
6 May 2010 General Election Result 51,13516.1%23.5%53.4%2.3%1.8%2.7%29.9% over Con

Members of Parliament

ElectionMemberParty
1885 Charles Stuart-Wortley Conservative
1916 b H. A. L. Fisher Liberal
1918 Douglas Vickers Conservative
1922 Frederick Sykes [n 5] Conservative
1928 b Louis Smith Conservative
1939 b Roland Jennings Conservative
1959 John Osborn Conservative
1987 Irvine Patnick Conservative
1997 Richard Allan Liberal Democrats
2005 Nick Clegg Liberal Democrats
2017 Jared O'Mara Labour
October 2017 Independent
July 2018 Labour
July 2018 Independent
2019 Olivia Blake Labour

Elections

Election results for Sheffield Hallam HallamGraph.svg
Election results for Sheffield Hallam

Elections in the 2010s

General election 2019: Sheffield Hallam [25]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Olivia Blake 19,709 34.6 Decrease2.svg 3.8
Liberal Democrats Laura Gordon18,99733.4Decrease2.svg 1.3
Conservative Ian Walker14,69625.8Increase2.svg 2.0
Green Natalie Thomas1,6302.9Increase2.svg 1.5
Brexit Party Terence McHale1,5622.7New
UKIP Michael Virgo1680.3Decrease2.svg 1.3
Independent Liz Aspden1230.2New
Majority7121.2Decrease2.svg 2.5
Turnout 56,88578.2Increase2.svg 0.4
Labour hold Swing Decrease2.svg 1.2
General election 2017: Sheffield Hallam [26] [23]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Jared O'Mara 21,881 38.4 Increase2.svg 2.6
Liberal Democrats Nick Clegg 19,75634.7Decrease2.svg 5.3
Conservative Ian Walker13,56123.8Increase2.svg 10.2
UKIP John Thurley9291.6Decrease2.svg 4.8
Green Logan Robin8231.4Decrease2.svg 1.8
SDP Steven Winstone700.1New
Majority2,1253.7N/A
Turnout 57,02077.8Increase2.svg 2.5
Labour gain from Liberal Democrats Swing Increase2.svg 4.0
General election 2015: Sheffield Hallam [27] [28]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Democrats Nick Clegg 22,215 40.0 Decrease2.svg 13.4
Labour Oliver Coppard19,86235.8Increase2.svg 19.7
Conservative Ian Walker7,54413.6Decrease2.svg 9.9
UKIP Joe Jenkins3,5756.4Increase2.svg 4.1
Green Peter Garbutt1,7723.2Increase2.svg 1.4
Independent Carlton Reeve2490.4New
English Democrat Steve Clegg1670.3Decrease2.svg 0.8
Independent Jim Stop the Fiasco Wild970.2New
Majority2,3534.2Decrease2.svg 25.7
Turnout 55,48175.3Increase2.svg 1.6
Liberal Democrats hold Swing Decrease2.svg 16.5
General election 2010: Sheffield Hallam [29] [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Democrats Nick Clegg 27,324 53.4 Increase2.svg 7.2
Conservative Nicola Bates12,04023.5Decrease2.svg 6.6
Labour Jack Scott8,22816.1Decrease2.svg 1.7
UKIP Nigel James1,1952.3Increase2.svg 1.0
Green Steve Barnard9191.8Decrease2.svg 0.8
English Democrat David Wildgoose5861.1New
Independent Martin Fitzpatrick4290.8New
Christian Ray Green2500.5New
Monster Raving Loony Mark Adshead1640.3New
Majority15,28429.9Increase2.svg 8.5
Turnout 51,13573.7Increase2.svg 11.5
Liberal Democrats hold Swing Increase2.svg 6.9

In 2010, Sheffield Hallam was one of a number of constituencies which experienced problems on polling day leading to some people being unable to cast their vote. In this case, voters at the Ranmoor polling station were subjected to long queues and some voters were turned away when polls closed at 10 pm, with Liberal Democrat candidate Nick Clegg apologising to those voters affected. Acting Returning Officer John Mothersole said that staff had been "caught out" by a high turnout, and the Electoral Commission instigated a review of procedures in Hallam and other constituencies where similar problems had occurred. [31]

Elections in the 2000s

General election 2005: Sheffield Hallam [32]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Democrats Nick Clegg 20,710 51.2 −4.2
Conservative Spencer Pitfield12,02829.7−1.3
Labour Mahroof Hussain5,11012.6+0.2
Green Rob Cole1,3313.3New
CPA Sidney Cordle4411.1New
UKIP Nigel James4381.10.0
BNP Ian Senior3690.9New
Majority8,68221.4−3.0
Turnout 40,52762.2−2.6
Liberal Democrats hold Swing -1.5
General election 2001: Sheffield Hallam [33]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Democrats Richard Allan 21,203 55.4 +4.1
Conservative John Harthman11,85631.0−2.1
Labour Gillian Furniss 4,75812.4−1.1
UKIP Leslie Arnott4291.1New
Majority9,34724.4+6.2
Turnout 38,24664.8−7.6
Liberal Democrats hold Swing +3.1

Elections in the 1990s

General election 1997: [n 6] Sheffield Hallam [34] [35]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Democrats Richard Allan 23,345 51.3 +18.2
Conservative Irvine Patnick 15,07433.1−12.4
Labour Stephen G. Conquest6,14713.5−6.6
Referendum Ian S. Davidson7881.7New
IndependentPhilip Booler1250.3New
Majority8,27118.2N/A
Turnout 45,47972.4+1.6
Liberal Democrats gain from Conservative Swing +15.3
General election 1992: Sheffield Hallam [36]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Irvine Patnick 24,693 45.5 −0.8
Liberal Democrats Peter J. Gold17,95233.1+0.6
Labour Veronica Hardstaff 10,93020.1−0.3
Green Mallen Baker 4730.9+0.1
Natural Law Richard E. Hurtford1010.2New
Revolutionary Communist Theresa M. Clifford990.2New
Majority6,74112.4−1.4
Turnout 54,24870.8−3.9
Conservative hold Swing -0.7

Elections in the 1980s

General election 1987: Sheffield Hallam [37]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Irvine Patnick [n 7] 25,649 46.3 −4.3
Liberal Peter Gold18,01232.5+4.1
Labour Mukesh Savani11,29020.4+0.7
Green Leela Spencer4590.8New
Majority7,63713.8−2.4
Turnout 55,41074.7+1.9
Conservative hold Swing -4.2
General election 1983: Sheffield Hallam [38]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative John Osborn 26,851 50.6 −4.3
Liberal Malcolm S. Johnson15,07728.4+12.7
Labour Jean McCrindle10,46319.7−9.1
Ind. Conservative Philip Booler6561.2New
Majority11,77422.2−3.9
Turnout 53,04772.8+0.3
Conservative hold Swing -8.5

Elections in the 1970s

General election 1979: Sheffield Hallam
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative John Osborn 31,436 54.9 +5.9
Labour Mike Bower16,50228.8−0.2
Liberal Kenneth Salt8,98215.7−6.3
National Front G. F. Smith3000.5New
Majority14,93426.1+6.1
Turnout 57,22072.5+2.7
Conservative hold Swing +3.05
General election October 1974: Sheffield Hallam
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative John Osborn 26,083 49.0 +0.1
Labour Clive Betts [n 8] 15,41929.0+1.8
Liberal Malcolm Johnson11,72422.0−1.9
Majority10,66420.0−1.8
Turnout 5322668.8−8.4
Conservative hold Swing -0.85
General election February 1974: Sheffield Hallam
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative John Osborn 29,062 48.9 −12.4
Labour David Blunkett [n 9] 16,14927.2−4.2
Liberal Malcolm Johnson14,16023.9+16.6
Majority12,91321.7−8.2 [n 10]
Turnout 59,37177.2+7.4
Conservative hold Swing -4.1
General election 1970: Sheffield Hallam
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative John Osborn 25,134 61.3 +10.0
Labour Alan Broadley12,88431.4-1.1
Liberal Preetam Singh2,9727.3-8.9
Majority12,25029.9+11.1
Turnout 40,99069.8-5.2
Conservative hold Swing +5.55

Elections in the 1960s

General election 1966: Sheffield Hallam
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative John Osborn 21,593 51.3 -3.7
Labour Peter Hardy 13,66332.5+5.5
Liberal Denis Lloyd6,79916.2-1.9
Majority7,93018.8-9.2
Turnout 42,05575.0+0.9
Conservative hold Swing -4.6
General election 1964: Sheffield Hallam
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative John Osborn 23,719 55.0 -7.8
Labour Arthur Kingscott11,63527.0+0.9
Liberal George Manley7,80718.1+6.9
Majority12,08428.0-8.7
Turnout 43,16174.1-2.0
Conservative hold Swing -4.4

Elections in the 1950s

General election 1959: Sheffield Hallam [39]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative and National Liberal John Osborn 28,747 62.8 -3.4
Labour Solomon Sachs 11,93826.1-7.7
Liberal Bernard Roseby5,11911.2New
Majority16,80936.7+4.3
Turnout 45,80476.1+2.0
Conservative and National Liberal hold Swing +5.6
General election 1955: Sheffield Hallam [40]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative and National Liberal Roland Jennings 30,069 66.2 -4.6
Labour James Marsden15,33033.8+4.6
Majority14,73932.4-9.2
Turnout 45,39974.1-7.9
Conservative and National Liberal hold Swing
General election 1951: Sheffield Hallam [41]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative and National Liberal Roland Jennings 29,016 70.8 +5.7
Labour Frederick Beaton11,98829.2+2.7
Majority17,02841.6+3.0
Turnout 41,00482.0-4.4
Conservative and National Liberal hold Swing
General election 1950: Sheffield Hallam [42]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative and National Liberal Roland Jennings 28,159 65.1 +18.0
Labour H. C. Spears11,44426.5-12.0
Liberal Alfred E Jones3,6418.4+0.7
Majority16,71538.6+30.0
Turnout 43,24486.4+10.7
Conservative and National Liberal hold Swing

Elections in the 1940s

General election 1945: Sheffield Hallam [n 11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Roland Jennings 15,874 47.1 -20.2
Labour John Frederick Drabble13,00938.5+5.8
Liberal Gerald Abrahams 2,6147.7New
Communist Gordon Cree2,2536.7New
Majority2,8658.6-24.0
Turnout 33,75075.7+4.0
Conservative hold Swing -13.0

Elections in the 1930s

1939 Sheffield Hallam by-election [n 12]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Roland Jennings 16,033 61.7 -5.6
Labour C. S. Darvill9,93938.3+5.6
Majority6,09423.4-11.2
Turnout 25,97257.8-13.9
Conservative hold Swing +5.6
General election 1935: Sheffield Hallam
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Louis Smith 21,298 67.3 -10.2
Labour Grace Colman 10,34632.7+10.2
Majority10,95234.6-20.4
Turnout 31,64471.7-8.6
Conservative hold Swing +10.2
General election 1931: Sheffield Hallam
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Louis Smith 26,857 77.5 +16.6
Labour Henry McGhee 7,80722.5-16.6
Majority19,05055.0+23.2
Turnout 34,66480.3+7.1
Conservative hold Swing +16.6

Elections in the 1920s

General election 1929: Sheffield Hallam
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Unionist Louis Smith 18,920 60.9 +7.2
Labour Basil Rawson12,13339.1+8.3
Majority6,78721.8-1.1
Turnout 31,05373.2+18.5
Unionist hold Swing
1928 Sheffield Hallam by-election [n 13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Unionist Louis Smith 9,417 53.7 -10.0
Labour Charles Flynn 5,39330.8-5.5
Liberal Joseph Burton Hobman 2,71515.5New
Majority4,02422.9-4.5
Turnout 17,52554.7-23.1
Unionist hold Swing
General election 1924: Sheffield Hallam
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Unionist Frederick Sykes 15,446 63.7 +6.0
Labour Edward Snelgrove8,80736.3+12.4
Majority6,63927.4-1.4
Turnout 24,25377.8+2.8
Unionist hold Swing
General election 1923: Sheffield Hallam
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Unionist Frederick Sykes 12,119 57.7 -1.7
Labour Arnold Freeman 5,50623.9New
Liberal Cuthbert Snowball Rewcastle 5,38323.4-17.2
Majority6,61328.8+10.0
Turnout 23,00875.0+1.3
Unionist hold Swing N/A
General election 1922: Sheffield Hallam
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Unionist Frederick Sykes 13,405 59.4 N/A
Liberal Cuthbert Snowball Rewcastle 9,17340.6New
Majority4,23218.8N/A
Turnout 22,57873.7N/A
Unionist hold Swing

Elections in the 1910s

General election 1918: Sheffield Hallam
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
C Unionist Douglas Vickers Unopposed
Unionist hold
Cindicates candidate endorsed by the coalition government.
1916 by-election

This followed the resignation of Charles Stuart-Wortley on 16 December. Herbert Fisher of the Liberal Party was elected unopposed, becoming Hallam's first non-Unionist MP.

1916 Sheffield Hallam by-election [43]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal H. A. L. Fisher Unopposed
Liberal gain from Unionist
Arthur Neal 1919 Arthur Neal.jpg
Arthur Neal
General election December 1910: Sheffield Hallam [43]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Charles Stuart-Wortley 5,788 50.9 0.0
Liberal Arthur Neal 5,59349.10.0
Majority1951.8+0.0
Turnout 11,38184.15.7
Registered electors 13,527
Conservative hold Swing +0.0
General election January 1910: Sheffield Hallam [43]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Charles Stuart-Wortley 6,181 50.9 +0.5
Liberal Arthur Neal 5,96549.10.5
Majority2161.8+1.0
Turnout 12,14689.8+4.8
Registered electors 13,527
Conservative hold Swing +0.5

Elections in the 1900s

General election 1906: Sheffield Hallam [43]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Charles Stuart-Wortley 5,546 50.4 N/A
Liberal A. Grant5,46549.6New
Majority810.8N/A
Turnout 11,01185.0N/A
Registered electors 12,956
Conservative hold Swing N/A
General election 1900: Sheffield Hallam [43]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Charles Stuart-Wortley Unopposed
Conservative hold

Elections in the 1890s

General election 1895: Sheffield Hallam [43]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Charles Stuart-Wortley Unopposed
Conservative hold
General election 1892: Sheffield Hallam [43]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Charles Stuart-Wortley 4,057 54.3 3.5
Liberal Robert Hammond3,41445.7+3.5
Majority6438.67.0
Turnout 7,47187.3+8.4
Registered electors 8,561
Conservative hold Swing 3.5

Elections in the 1880s

General election 1886: Sheffield Hallam [43]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Charles Stuart-Wortley 3,581 57.8 +3.4
Lib-Lab T. R. Threlfall 2,61242.23.4
Majority96915.6+6.8
Turnout 6,19378.99.3
Registered electors 7,846
Conservative hold Swing +3.4
General election 1885: Sheffield Hallam [43]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Charles Stuart-Wortley 3,764 54.4
Liberal Charles Warren 3,15545.6
Majority6098.8
Turnout 6,91988.2
Registered electors 7,846
Conservative win (new seat)

See also

Notes

  1. A county constituency (for the purposes of election expenses and type of returning officer)
  2. As with all constituencies, the constituency elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election at least every five years.
  3. Also above Cities of London and Westminster and Hammersmith and Fulham.
  4. The constituency should not be confused with the former Hallamshire constituency.
  5. Knighted in 1928 and appointed Governor of Bombay
  6. At the 1997 general election the seat saw an unprecedented 18.2% one-party swing from the other parties, particularly the large Conservative vote, towards the Liberal Democrat winning candidate.
  7. After 28 years as MP for the seat, John Osborn stood down at the 1987 general election. His replacement as the Conservative Party candidate, local businessman Irvine Patnick, held the seat for the Conservatives with a slightly reduced majority.
  8. Clive Betts, the losing Labour candidate at the October 1974 general election, won the Sheffield Attercliffe seat in 1992.
  9. David Blunkett, the losing February 1974 Labour candidate, won the Sheffield Brightside seat in 1987 enabling his later positions in government as Secretary of State (1997–2005).
  10. The constituency boundaries were redrawn prior to the February 1974 general election, perhaps accounting for the reduced majority of the incumbent, John Osborn.
  11. "Conservative and Liberal"
  12. "Conservative and Liberal"
  13. The 1928 by-election followed the resignation of Frederick Sykes on 26 June to take up an appointment as Governor of Bombay.

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Manchester Withington is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2015 by Jeff Smith of Labour. Of the 30 seats with the highest percentage of winning majority in 2017, the seat ranks 25th with a 55.7% margin, and is the only one of the twenty nine of these seats won by the Labour Party in which the second-placed candidate was a Liberal Democrat, rather than Conservative. This is despite being a Conservative seat right up to 1987, then becoming relatively safely Labour, then Liberal Democrat from 2005-2015 before they lost on a large swing in 2015, after which Smith substantially increased his majority.

Stockton South (UK Parliament constituency)

Stockton South is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since December 2019 by Matt Vickers, a Conservative MP.

Redcar (UK Parliament constituency)

Redcar is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2019 by Jacob Young, a Conservative.

Pudsey (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom

Pudsey is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2010 by Stuart Andrew, a Conservative.

Nottingham North (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom

Nottingham North is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2017 by Alex Norris of the Labour and Co-operative party.

Nuneaton (UK Parliament constituency)

Nuneaton is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2010 by Marcus Jones, a Conservative. Since 1997, the seat has been seen as an important national bellwether.

Stoke-on-Trent Central (UK Parliament constituency)

Stoke-on-Trent Central is a constituency in Staffordshire. It has been represented by Jo Gideon of the Conservative Party since the general election of 2019.

Birmingham Ladywood (UK Parliament constituency)

Birmingham Ladywood is a constituency of part of the city of Birmingham, represented in the House of Commons since 2010 by Shabana Mahmood of the Labour Party.

Richmond Park (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom

Richmond Park is a parliamentary constituency in the House of Commons of the United Kingdom. Sarah Olney of the Liberal Democrats won the seat at a by-election in 2016 after Zac Goldsmith of the Conservative Party stood down in protest over expansion of Heathrow Airport. Goldsmith stood as an independent at the by-election, but the Conservative whip was restored for the 2017 general election, where he regained the seat with a slim majority. Olney won the seat from Goldsmith a second time at the 2019 general election.

Sutton and Cheam (UK Parliament constituency)

Sutton and Cheam is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2015 by Paul Scully, a Conservative.

Woking (UK Parliament constituency)

Woking is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2010 by Jonathan Lord, a Conservative. Since it was first created for the 1950 general election, it has returned solely Conservative Party candidates.

Harrow West (UK Parliament constituency)

Harrow West is a constituency which was created in 1945 and is represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament. Until 1997, it only returned Conservative MPs; since then, it has elected the Labour Co-operative MP Gareth Thomas on a fluctuating majority. Since 2010, this has been bolstered by the loss of Pinner from the seat and the gain of a favourable ward for Labour from Harrow East.

Paul Scriven

Paul James Scriven, Lord Scriven is a Liberal Democrat politician and former Leader of Sheffield City Council (2008–11), who was once described as Nick Clegg's "closest ally in local government".

References

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  2. "Constituency data: electorates – House of Commons Library". Parliament UK. 15 June 2020. Retrieved 22 July 2020.
  3. 1 2 Wealth hotspots 'outside London' BBC News
  4. Income and tax by Parliamentary constituency HMRC
  5. Sheffield – a city of class division The Guardian
  6. UCU – University and College Union – National ranking – degree level and above University and College Union
  7. Unemployment claimants by constituency The Guardian
  8. "2011 Census Interactive – ONS". ons.gov.uk. Archived from the original on 29 January 2016.
  9. "OpenStreetMap". openstreetmap.org.
  10. "Former Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg loses seat amid Labour surge". The Telegraph. Retrieved 9 June 2017.
  11. Elgot, Jessica (24 August 2018). "Labour reinstates suspended MP Jared O'Mara". The Guardian. Retrieved 3 July 2018.
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  13. "Jared O'Mara: Sheffield MP to resign from Parliament". BBC News. 27 July 2019.
  14. "MP O'Mara 'postpones' his resignation". 3 September 2019 via www.bbc.co.uk.
  15. "'Jared O'Mara had his faults, but he highlighted crucial issues,' says new MP for Sheffield Hallam Olivia Blake". Yorkshire Post. 15 January 2020. Retrieved 5 June 2020.
  16. "Populus/Lord Ashcroft opinion poll of Sheffield Hallam, 1–4 October 2010, full data charts" (PDF).
  17. "ICM/Lord Oakeshott opinion poll of Sheffield Hallam, 29 April-4 May 2014, full data charts" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 24 September 2015.
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  23. 1 2 "Sheffield Hallam Result 2017". BBC News. Retrieved 11 June 2017.
  24. This poll originally, erroneously, showed a small lead for the LDs: see http://lordashcroftpolls.com/2015/02/sheffield-hallam-doncaster-north-thanet-south/#more-7536
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  31. "Nick Clegg apologises to voters in polling queues". BBC News. 7 May 2010. Retrieved 11 May 2010.
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  33. "Election Data 2001". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  34. "Election Data 1997". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  35. "Sheffield Hallam". ElectionWeb Project. Cognitive Computing Limited. Retrieved 20 May 2016.
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  38. "Election Data 1983". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
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  41. "Data". tools.assembla.com. 1951. Retrieved 16 November 2019.
  42. "Data". tools.assembla.com. 1950. Retrieved 16 November 2019.
  43. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Craig, FWS, ed. (1974). British Parliamentary Election Results: 1885-1918. London: Macmillan Press. ISBN   9781349022984.

External sources