List of London Assembly constituencies

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Greater London is divided into fourteen territorial constituencies for London Assembly elections, each returning one member. The electoral system used is additional member system without an overhang and there are, therefore, a fixed number of eleven additional members elected from a party list.

Contents

List of constituencies

As of the 2016 election, the fourteen single-member constituencies are listed below. Each constituency comprises between two and four local authorities, with an average electorate of around 440,000.

ConstituencyBoroughs2021 electorate [1] Party LondonAssemblyNumbered.svg
1 Barnet and Camden Barnet
Camden
412,332 Labour
2 Bexley and Bromley Bexley
Bromley
423,904 Conservative
3 Brent and Harrow Brent
Harrow
426,373 Labour
4 City and East Barking and Dagenham
City
Newham
Tower Hamlets
637,319 Labour
5 Croydon and Sutton Croydon
Sutton
432,130 Conservative
6 Ealing and Hillingdon Ealing
Hillingdon
447,103 Labour
7 Enfield and Haringey Enfield
Haringey
404,492 Labour
8 Greenwich and Lewisham Greenwich
Lewisham
402,501 Labour
9 Havering and Redbridge Havering
Redbridge
402,404 Conservative
10 Lambeth and Southwark Lambeth
Southwark
461,056 Labour
11 Merton and Wandsworth Merton
Wandsworth
387,795 Labour
12 North East Hackney
Islington
Waltham Forest
529,229 Labour
13 South West Hounslow
Kingston
Richmond
459,309 Conservative
14 West Central Hammersmith and Fulham
Kensington and Chelsea
Westminster
365,443 Conservative
6,191,387

Assembly Members

Constituency AMs

Election Barnet and Camden Bexley and Bromley Brent and Harrow City and East Croydon and Sutton Ealing and Hillingdon Enfield and Haringey Greenwich and Lewisham Havering and Redbridge Lambeth and Southwark Merton and Wandsworth North East South West West Central
2000 Brian Coleman
(Con)
Bob Neill
(Con)
Toby Harris
(Labour)
John Biggs
(Labour)
Andrew Pelling
(Con)
Richard Barnes
(Con)
Nicky Gavron
(Labour)
Len Duvall
(Labour)
Roger Evans
(Con)
Val Shawcross
(Labour)
Elizabeth Howlett
(Con)
Meg Hillier
(Labour)
Tony Arbour
(Con)
Angie Bray
(Con)
2004 Bob Blackman
(Con)
Joanne McCartney
(Labour)
Jennette Arnold
(Labour)
2008 James Cleverly
(Con)
Navin Shah
(Labour)
Steve O'Connell
(Con)
Richard Tracey
(Con)
Kit Malthouse
(Con)
2012 Andrew Dismore
(Labour)
Onkar Sahota
(Labour)
2016 Gareth Bacon
(Con)
Unmesh Desai
(Labour)
Keith Prince
(Con)
Florence Eshalomi
(Labour)
Leonie Cooper
(Labour)
Tony Devenish
(Con)
2021 Anne Clarke
(Labour)
Peter Fortune
(Con)
Krupesh Hirani
(Labour)
Neil Garratt
(Con)
Marina Ahmad
(Labour)
Sem Moema
(Labour)
Nicholas Rogers
(Con)

Additional Members

By seat

Seats allocated using d'Hondt method, in order. Any party gaining less than 5% of the vote is not eligible for an Additional Assembly Member seat. Transfers within parties between elections omitted for simplicity. [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7]

Election1st AM2nd AM3rd AM4th AM5th AM6th AM7th AM8th AM9th AM10th AM11th AM
2000 LD
(Sally Hamwee)
Green
(Darren Johnson)
LD
(Graham Tope)
Green
(Victor Anderson)
LD
(Lynne Featherstone)
Labour
(Trevor Phillips)
Labour
(Samantha Heath)
LD
(Louise Bloom)
Green
(Jenny Jones)
Labour
(David Lammy)
Con
(Eric Ollerenshaw)
2004 LD
(Lynne Featherstone)
Green
(Jenny Jones)
LD
(Graham Tope)
UKIP
(Damian Hockney)
LD
(Sally Hamwee)
Green
(Darren Johnson)
LD
(Michael Tuffrey)
UKIP
(Peter Hulme-Cross)
Labour
(Nicky Gavron)
Labour
(Murad Qureshi)
LD
(Dee Doocey)
2008 LD
(Michael Tuffrey)
Green
(Jenny Jones)
LD
(Dee Doocey)
BNP
(Richard Barnbrook)
Green
(Darren Johnson)
Labour
(Nicky Gavron)
Con
(Andrew Boff)
LD
(Caroline Pidgeon)
Con
(Victoria Borwick)
Labour
(Murad Qureshi)
Con
(Gareth Bacon)
2012 Green
(Jenny Jones)
LD
(Caroline Pidgeon)
Labour
(Nicky Gavron)
Con
(Andrew Boff)
Green
(Darren Johnson)
Labour
(Murad Qureshi)
Con
(Gareth Bacon)
Labour
(Fiona Twycross)
Con
(Victoria Borwick)
Labour
(Tom Copley)
LD
(Stephen Knight)
2016 Green
(Siân Berry)
UKIP
(Peter Whittle)
LD
(Caroline Pidgeon)
Con
(Kemi Badenoch)
Con
(Andrew Boff)
Labour
(Fiona Twycross)
Green
(Caroline Russell)
Labour
(Tom Copley)
Con
(Shaun Bailey)
Labour
(Nicky Gavron)
UKIP
(David Kurten)
2021 LD
(Caroline Pidgeon)
Green
(Caroline Russell)
Con
(Shaun Bailey)
Green
(Zack Polanski)
Con
(Susan Hall)
Labour
(Elly Baker)
LD
(Hina Bokhari)
Labour
(Sakina Sheikh)
Con
(Emma Best)

By party representation

N.B.: The columns of this table do not represent actual constituencies.

YearAMAMAMAMAMAMAMAMAMAMAM
2000 Samantha Heath
(Labour)
David Lammy
(Labour)
Trevor Phillips
(Labour)
Graham Tope
(LD)
Louise Bloom
(LD)
Lynne Featherstone
(LD)
Sally Hamwee
(LD)
Eric Ollerenshaw
(Con)
Victor Anderson
(Green)
Darren Johnson
(Green)
Jenny Jones
(Green)
2000 Jennette Arnold
(Labour)
2002 Michael Tuffrey
(LD)
2003 Diana Johnson
(Labour)
Noel Lynch
(Green)
2004 Dee Doocey
(LD)
Murad Qureshi
(Labour)
Nicky Gavron
(Labour)
Damian Hockney
(UKIP/1L)
Peter Hulme-Cross
(UKIP/1L)
2005 Geoff Pope
(LD)
2008 Richard Barnbrook
(BNP)
Caroline Pidgeon
(LD)
Andrew Boff
(Con)
Gareth Bacon
(Con)
Victoria Borwick
(Con)
2012 Stephen Knight
(LD)
Tom Copley
(Labour)
Fiona Twycross
(Labour)
2015 Kemi Badenoch
(Con)
2016 David Kurten
(UKIP/Brexit Alliance)
Peter Whittle
(UKIP/Brexit Alliance)
Shaun Bailey
(Con)
Siân Berry
(Green)
Caroline Russell
(Green)
2017 Susan Hall
(Con)
2018
2021 Emma Best
(Con)
Zack Polanski
(Green)
Elly Baker
(Labour)
Sakina Sheikh
(Labour)
Hina Bokhari
(LD)

See also

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References

  1. "Results 2021 | London Elects". www.londonelects.org.uk.
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