Parang Nabur

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Parang Nabur
Parang Nabur.jpg
An illustration of a Parang Nabur.
TypeSword, Cutlass
Place of origin Borneo (South Kalimantan, Indonesia)
Service history
Used by Banjarese
Specifications
Length50–90 cm

Blade  typePartial double edge, convex grind
Hilt  typeBuffalo horn, bone, wood
Scabbard/sheath Wood

Parang Nabur (other names also include Belabang or Beladah, while older variants are called Pacat Gantung or Pacat Bagantung) is a sword that originates from Banjarmasin, South Kalimantan, Indonesia. Most of these swords were made during the Banjarmasin Sultanate period in the 19th century.

Contents

Description

The Parang Nabur is a sword with a curved blade broadening towards the point, with its widest section at the curvature. [1] The edge is convex, while the back is concave. It has a double edge for about 2/3 to 3/8 of the blade from its front tip. The edge may bend towards the back or the back may bend towards the edge at the point. The hilt is usually made of horn or bone, sometimes of wood, and often has protection for the hand and fingers made of brass or iron. The hand guard and parry are made similar to European models, strongly influenced from the naval cutlasses carried by the Dutch sailors, and shows a blend of European and Islamic styles. The scabbard is usually made of wood. It is built in two parts held together by bands of metal, and it follows the blade's shape. [2] The Parang Nabur is also not to be mistaken with the Niabor.

See also

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Pandat Type of Chopper, War Sword

The Pandat is the war sword of the Dayak people of northwest Borneo and is never used as a tool. On October 18, 2016, this weapon was featured in season 3 episode 9 of the American bladesmithing competition series Forged in Fire.

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References

  1. Nick Evangelista (1995). The Encyclopedia of the Sword. Greenwood Publishing Group. ISBN   0-313-27896-2.
  2. Albert G Van Zonneveld (2002). Traditional Weapons of the Indonesian Archipelago. Koninklyk Instituut Voor Taal Land. ISBN   90-5450-004-2.

Further reading