Park City, Kentucky

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Park City, Kentucky
Park-City-Renfro-Hotel-ky.jpg
Grand Victorian Inn in Park City
Barren County Kentucky Incorporated and Unincorporated areas Park City Highlighted 2159232.svg
Location of Park City in Barren County, Kentucky.
Coordinates: 37°5′39″N86°2′54″W / 37.09417°N 86.04833°W / 37.09417; -86.04833 Coordinates: 37°5′39″N86°2′54″W / 37.09417°N 86.04833°W / 37.09417; -86.04833
Country United States
State Kentucky
County Barren
Incorporated1871 [1]
Named for nearby Mammoth Cave [2]
Area
[3]
  Total1.47 sq mi (3.81 km2)
  Land1.47 sq mi (3.80 km2)
  Water0.00 sq mi (0.01 km2)
Elevation
640 ft (195 m)
Population
 (2010)
  Total537
  Estimate 
(2019) [4]
559
  Density380.79/sq mi (147.02/km2)
Time zone UTC-6 (Central (CST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code
42160
Area code(s) 270 & 364
FIPS code 21-59232
GNIS feature ID0500179
Website parkcity.ky.gov

Park City is a home rule-class city in Barren County, Kentucky, United States. The population was 537 at the 2010 census. [5] It has historically served as a gateway to nearby Mammoth Cave National Park and to Diamond Caverns, a privately owned cave attraction.

Contents

Park City is part of the Glasgow micropolitan area.

History

In the early 19th century, the site of the present city was the junction of the Louisville and Nashville Pike with spur roads to Glasgow and Bardstown. By 1827, a stagecoach relay station had developed into a settlement with a post office named Three Forks. [2] The postmaster William Bell owned a 1,500-acre (610 ha) plantation nearby, with a prominent tavern, which led to the community also being known as Bell's Station. [6] In 1859, the mainline of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad reached the plantation, and in 1863 the Glasgow spur was completed. The community was then known as Glasgow Junction after the L&N Depot, which also served as the junction between the mainline and the Mammoth Cave Railroad. There was a close relationship between Mammoth Cave and Diamond Cave (Diamond Caverns) for years. Books and cave brochures would describe both caves. Beginning in 1880, the Mammoth Cave Railroad tracks were laid just west of Diamond Cave. When the line finally opened in 1886, Diamond was one of the primary stops on the railroad. Excursions were available to see Diamond and Mammoth Caves on the same day, and still return to Glasgow Junction in time to catch through trains to Louisville or Nashville. Mammoth Cave Railroad stops also served two nearby caves opened by Larkin Proctor, Long Cave, commercialized as Grand Avenue Caverns, and Proctor Cave. The city was platted and formally incorporated under that name in 1871. [2]

In 1938, the name was changed to Park City to avoid confusion with Glasgow. [2]

Geography

Park City is located in western Barren County at 37°5′39″N86°2′54″W / 37.09417°N 86.04833°W / 37.09417; -86.04833 (37.094181, -86.048309). [7] U.S. Route 31W passes through the center of the city, and Interstate 65 cuts through the northwest corner, with access via Exit 48 (Kentucky Route 255/Mammoth Cave Parkway). The CSX Transportation rail line (former L&N) also passes through the center of the city.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.5 square miles (3.8 km2), of which 0.004 square miles (0.01 km2), or 0.25%, is water. [5]

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1890 217
1900 2243.2%
1910 30335.3%
1920 3071.3%
1930 37421.8%
1940 354−5.3%
1950 44826.6%
1960 49710.9%
1970 56714.1%
1980 6148.3%
1990 549−10.6%
2000 517−5.8%
2010 5373.9%
Est. 2019559 [4] 4.1%
U.S. Decennial Census [8]

As of the census [9] of 2000, there were 517 people, 237 households, and 142 families residing in the city. The population density was 303.5 people per square mile (117.4/km2). There were 263 housing units at an average density of 154.4 per square mile (59.7/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 93.23% White, 6.38% African American, 0.19% from other races, and 0.19% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.58% of the population.

There were 237 households, out of which 27.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.5% were married couples living together, 8.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.7% were non-families. 37.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 20.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.18 and the average family size was 2.91.

In the city, the population was spread out, with 21.3% under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 30.6% from 25 to 44, 22.2% from 45 to 64, and 18.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females, there were 92.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.0 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $25,313, and the median income for a family was $36,042. Males had a median income of $26,364 versus $17,778 for females. The per capita income for the city was $13,888. About 13.1% of families and 15.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.6% of those under age 18 and 25.6% of those age 65 or over.

See also

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Mammoth Cave Railroad

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Mammoth Cave Parkway

The Mammoth Cave Parkway is a major roadway located in the Mammoth Cave National Park in west-central Kentucky. It encompasses parts of Kentucky Routes 70 and 255 within the park. It closely follows the Mammoth Cave Railroad Bike & Hike Trail.

References

  1. Commonwealth of Kentucky. Office of the Secretary of State. Land Office. "Park City, Kentucky". Accessed 26 August 2013.
  2. 1 2 3 4 Rennick, Robert. Kentucky Place Names, p. 226. University Press of Kentucky (Lexington), 1987. Accessed 25 September 2013.
  3. "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 24, 2020.
  4. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  5. 1 2 "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Park City city, Kentucky". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Archived from the original on February 12, 2020. Retrieved November 19, 2013.
  6. Park City. Official website. Accessed 25 September 2013. Archived October 18, 2013, at the Wayback Machine
  7. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  8. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  9. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.