Thorn-Stingley House

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Thorn-Stingley House
Alaska Heritage Resources Survey
Thorn-Stingley House.jpg
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Location 1660 East End Road, Homer, Alaska
Coordinates 59°39′23″N151°30′2″W / 59.65639°N 151.50056°W / 59.65639; -151.50056 Coordinates: 59°39′23″N151°30′2″W / 59.65639°N 151.50056°W / 59.65639; -151.50056
Area less than one acre
Built 1945
Built by Francis H. Thorn
Architectural style Bungalow/craftsman
NRHP reference # 01000023 [1]
AHRS # SEL-00155
Added to NRHP February 2, 2001

The Thorn-Stingley House is a historic house at 1660 East End Road in Homer, Alaska, which was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2001. [1] It is a 1-1/2 story wood frame structure, roughly rectangular in shape, with a side-gable roof and a full basement that includes a one-car garage. The house is in a local interpretation of the Bungalow style, with a pair of gable-roof dormers projecting from the front roof, and a projecting gable-roofed hood above the main entrance. The front facade is divided into three asymmetrical bays, with a grouping of three sash windows in the left bay (over the garage entrance), the entry in the center, and a single sash window to the right. The house, built in 1945, is one of the city's only little-altered representatives of housing built in Homer's boom years following World War II. [2]

Homer, Alaska City in Alaska, United States

Homer is a city in Kenai Peninsula Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is 218 miles southwest of Anchorage. According to the 2010 Census, the population is 5,003, up from 3,946 in 2000. Long known as The "Halibut Fishing Capital of the World." Homer is also nicknamed "the end of the road," and more recently, "the cosmic hamlet by the sea."

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

World War II 1939–1945 global war

World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. A state of total war emerged, directly involving more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. The major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease, and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.

It was built by Francis H. Thorn, a well-driller; he and/or his family lived in it until 1973. [2]

See also

National Register of Historic Places listings in Kenai Peninsula Borough, Alaska Wikimedia list article

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Kenai Peninsula Borough, Alaska.

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