Trioracodon

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Trioracodon
Temporal range: Tithonian-Berriasian
~146–140  Ma
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Eutriconodonta
Family: Triconodontidae
Genus: Trioracodon
Simpson, 1928
Species
  • T. bisulcus
  • T. ferox
  • T. major
  • T. oweni

Trioracodon is an extinct genus of Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous eutriconodont mammal found in North America and the British Isles. It was named in 1928 [1]

It is known from the Morrison Formation, where it is present in stratigraphic zone 5., [2] and from the Purbeck Group in Dorset. [3]

See also

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References

  1. G. G. Simpson. 1928. A Catalogue of the Mesozoic Mammalia in the Geological Department of the British Museum 1-215
  2. Foster, J. (2007). "Appendix." Jurassic West: The Dinosaurs of the Morrison Formation and Their World. Indiana University Press. pp. 327-329.
  3. Clemens, W.A., 1963. L ate Jurassic mammalian fossils in the Sedgwick Museum, Cambridge. Palaeontology, 6(Part 2), pp.373-377.