(7482) 1994 PC1

Last updated

(7482) 1994 PC1
1994 PC1 orbit 2022.png
Orbit and positions on 1 January 2019
Discovery [1]
Discovered by R. H. McNaught
Discovery site Siding Spring Obs.
Discovery date9 August 1994
Designations
(7482) 1994 PC1
1994 PC1
Apollo  · NEO  · PHA [1] [2]
Orbital characteristics [1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 41.97 yr (15,331 days)
Aphelion 1.7882 AU
Perihelion 0.9042 AU
1.3462 AU
Eccentricity 0.3283
1.56 yr (571 days)
47.475°
0° 37m 51.6s / day
Inclination 33.487°
117.89°
47.625°
Earth  MOID 0.0010 AU (0.4 LD)
Physical characteristics
Mean diameter
1.052±0.303 km [3]
1.30 km (calculated) [4]
2.5999 h [5]
0.20 (assumed) [4]
0.277±0.185 [3]
SMASS = S [1] [4]
16.8 [1] [4]  ·16.80±0.3 [3]

    (7482) 1994 PC1 is a stony asteroid, classified as near-Earth object and potentially hazardous asteroid of the Apollo group, approximately 1.1 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 9 August 1994, by astronomer Robert McNaught at the Siding Spring Observatory in Coonabarabran, Australia. [2]

    Contents

    Orbit and classification

    1994 PC1 orbits the Sun at a distance of 0.9–1.8  AU once every 1 years and 7 months (571 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.33 and an inclination of 33° with respect to the ecliptic. [1]

    On 17 January 1933, it passed 0.00752 AU (1,125,000 km; 699,000 mi) from Earth. On 18 January 2022, it will pass 0.01324 AU (1,981,000 km; 1,231,000 mi) from Earth. [1]

    Physical characteristics

    In the SMASS classification, 1994 PC1 is a common stony S-type asteroid. [1] [4]

    Rotation period

    In 1998, a rotational lightcurve of 1994 PC1 was obtained from photometric observations by Petr Pravec. Lightcurve analysis gave a well-defined rotation period of 2.5999 hours with a brightness amplitude of 0.29 magnitude ( U=3 ). [5]

    Diameter and albedo

    According to the survey carried out by the NEOWISE mission of NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, 1994 PC1 measures 1.052 kilometers in diameter and its surface has an albedo of 0.277. [3] The Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link assumes an albedo of 0.20 and calculates a diameter of 1.30 kilometers based on an absolute magnitude of 16.8. [4]

    2022 flyby

    On 19 January 2022, 1994 PC1 will pass just outside of 3 lunar distances of the earth, with a peak magnitude of 7-8.

    Sky trajectory with hourly motion
    1994 PC1 skypath 2022.png
    History of close approaches of large near-Earth objects since 1908(A)
    PHA DateApproach distance (lunar dist.) Abs.
    mag

    ( H )
    Diameter(C)
    (m)
    Ref(D)
    Nomi-
    nal(B)
    Mini-
    mum
    Maxi-
    mum
    (33342) 1998 WT24 1908-12-163.5423.5373.54717.9556–1795 data
    (458732) 2011 MD5 1918-09-170.9110.9090.91317.9556–1795 data
    (7482) 1994 PC1 1933-01-172.9272.9272.92816.8749–1357 data
    69230 Hermes 1937-10-301.9261.9261.92717.5668–2158 data
    69230 Hermes1942-04-261.6511.6511.65117.5668–2158 data
    (137108) 1999 AN10 1946-08-072.4322.4292.43517.9556–1795 data
    (33342) 1998 WT24 1956-12-163.5233.5233.52317.9556–1795 data
    (163243) 2002 FB3 1961-04-124.9034.9004.90616.41669–1695 data
    (192642) 1999 RD32 1969-08-273.6273.6253.63016.31161–3750 data
    (143651) 2003 QO104 1981-05-182.7612.7602.76116.01333–4306 data
    2017 CH1 1992-06-054.6913.3916.03717.9556–1795 data
    (170086) 2002 XR14 1995-06-244.2594.2594.26018.0531–1714 data
    (33342) 1998 WT24 2001-12-164.8594.8594.85917.9556–1795 data
    4179 Toutatis 2004-09-294.0314.0314.03115.302440–2450 data
    2014 JO25 2017-04-194.5734.5734.57317.8582–1879 data
    (137108) 1999 AN10 2027-08-071.0141.0101.01917.9556–1795 data
    (35396) 1997 XF11 2028-10-262.4172.4172.41816.9881–2845 data
    (154276) 2002 SY50 2071-10-303.4153.4123.41817.6714–1406 data
    (164121) 2003 YT1 2073-04-294.4094.4094.40916.21167–2267 data
    (385343) 2002 LV 2076-08-044.1844.1834.18516.61011–3266 data
    (52768) 1998 OR2 2079-04-164.6114.6114.61215.81462–4721 data
    (33342) 1998 WT24 2099-12-184.9194.9194.91917.9556–1795 data
    (85182) 1991 AQ 2130-01-274.1404.1394.14117.11100 data
    314082 Dryope 2186-07-163.7092.9964.78617.5668–2158 data
    (137126) 1999 CF9 2192-08-214.9704.9674.97318.0531–1714 data
    (290772) 2005 VC 2198-05-051.9511.7912.13417.6638–2061 data
    (A) List includes near-Earth approaches of less than 5 lunar distances (LD) of objects with H brighter than 18.
    (B) Nominal geocentric distance from the Earth's center to the object's center (earth radius≈6400 km).
    (C) Diameter: estimated, theoretical mean-diameter based on H and albedo range between X and Y.
    (D) Reference: data source from the JPL SBDB, with AU converted into LD (1 AU≈390 LD)
    (E) Color codes:   unobserved at close approach  observed during close approach  upcoming approaches

    Naming

    As of 2018, this minor planet has not been named. [2]

    Related Research Articles

    2063 Bacchus, provisional designation 1977 HB, is a stony asteroid and near-Earth object of the Apollo group, approximately 1 kilometer in diameter. The contact binary was discovered on 24 April 1977, by American astronomer Charles Kowal at the Palomar Observatory in California, United States. It was named after Bacchus from Roman mythology.

    4197 Morpheus, provisional designation 1982 TA, is a highly eccentric asteroid and near-Earth object of the Apollo group, approximately 3 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 11 October 1982, by American astronomers Eleanor Helin and Eugene Shoemaker at Palomar Observatory in California, United States. The asteroid was later named for Morpheus from Greek mythology.

    1065 Amundsenia, provisional designation 1926 PD, is an stony asteroid and sizeable Mars-crosser on an eccentric orbit from the inner asteroid belt, approximately 10 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 4 August 1926, by Soviet astronomer Sergey Belyavsky at the Simeiz Observatory on the Crimean peninsula. The asteroid was named after Norwegian polar explorer Roald Amundsen.

    1126 Otero

    1126 Otero, provisional designation 1929 AC, is a rare-type Florian asteroid from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 10 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 11 January 1929, by German astronomer Karl Reinmuth at Heidelberg Observatory in southwest Germany. It was named after Spanish courtesan Carolina Otero.

    4957 Brucemurray, provisional designation 1990 XJ, is a stony asteroid, classified as near-Earth object of the Amor group and as Mars-crosser, approximately 3 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered by American astronomer Eleanor Helin at the Palomar Observatory in California on 15 December 1990. The asteroid was named after American planetary scientist Bruce C. Murray.

    1722 Goffin, provisional designation 1938 EG, is a stony asteroid from the central region of the asteroid belt, approximately 10.3 kilometers in diameter.

    7088 Ishtar, provisional designation 1992 AA, is a synchronous binary asteroid and near-Earth object from the Amor group, approximately 1.3 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 1 January 1992, by American astronomer Carolyn Shoemaker at the Palomar Observatory in California. The relatively bright asteroid with an unknown spectral type has a rotation period of 2.7 hours. In December 2005, a 330-meter sized satellite was discovered, orbiting its primary every 20.65 hours.

    5905 Johnson, provisional designation 1989 CJ1, is a Hungaria asteroid and synchronous binary system from the innermost regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 4 kilometers (2.5 miles) in diameter. It was discovered on 11 February 1989, by American astronomer Eleanor Helin at Palomar Observatory in California, United States. Its satellite measures approximately 1.6 km (1 mi) in diameter and orbits its primary every 21.8 hours. It was named after American astronomer and engineer Lindley N. Johnson.

    3102 Krok, provisional designation 1981 QA, is a rare-type asteroid and slow rotator, classified as a near-Earth object of the Amor group, that measures approximately 1.5 kilometers in diameter.

    15350 Naganuma, provisional designation 1994 VB2, is a stony background asteroid from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 4.3 kilometers (2.7 miles) in diameter. It was discovered on 3 November 1994, by Japanese astronomers Yoshio Kushida and Osamu Muramatsu at the Yatsugatake South Base Observatory. The likely S-type asteroid has a rotation period of 2.5 hours. It was named for the town of Naganuma in northern Japan.

    3288 Seleucus, provisional designation 1982 DV, is a rare-type stony asteroid, classified as near-Earth object of the Amor group of asteroids, approximately 2.5 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 28 February 1982, by German astronomer Hans-Emil Schuster at ESO's La Silla Observatory site in northern Chile. It was named after the Hellenistic general and Seleucid ruler Seleucus I Nicator.

    12923 Zephyr (prov. designation:1999 GK4) is a stony asteroid, classified as potentially hazardous asteroid and near-Earth object of the Apollo group, approximately 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) in diameter. It was discovered on 11 April 1999, by astronomers of the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search at Anderson Mesa Station near Flagstaff, Arizona. The asteroid was named after the deity Zephyrus from Greek mythology.

    (5645) 1990 SP is an eccentric and tumbling asteroid, classified as near-Earth object of the Apollo group, approximately 1.7 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 20 September 1990, by Scottish–Australian astronomer Robert McNaught at the Siding Spring Observatory in Canberra, Australia.

    (6037) 1988 EG, is an eccentric, stony asteroid, classified as near-Earth object and potentially hazardous asteroid. It belongs to the group of Apollo asteroids and measures approximately half a kilometer in diameter. It was discovered by American astronomer Jeff T. Alu at the U.S. Palomar Observatory, California, on 12 March 1988.

    (7025) 1993 QA is a sub-kilometer asteroid classified as near-Earth object of the Apollo and Amor group, respectively. It was discovered on 16 August 1993, by astronomers of the Spacewatch program at the Kitt Peak National Observatory near Tucson, Arizona, United States. The asteroid measures approximately half a kilometer in diameter and has a short rotation period of 2.5057 hours.

    (8201) 1994 AH2 is a highly eccentric, rare-type asteroid, classified as near-Earth object of the Apollo group of asteroids, approximately 2 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 5 January 1994, by Australian amateur astronomer Gordon Garradd during the AANEAS survey at the Siding Spring Observatory, Australia. It has an Earth minimum orbit intersection distance of 0.1 AU (15 million km) and is associated with the Beta Taurids daytime meteor shower.

    (10115) 1992 SK, is a stony near-Earth object and potentially hazardous asteroid on an eccentric orbit. It belongs to the group of Apollo asteroids and measures approximately 1 kilometer in diameter. It was discovered by American astronomers Eleanor Helin and Jeff Alu at the Palomar Observatory in California on 24 September 1992.

    21088 Chelyabinsk, provisional designation 1992 BL2, is a stony asteroid and near-Earth object of the Amor group, approximately 4 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 30 January 1992, by Belgian astronomer Eric Elst at ESO's La Silla Observatory in northern Chile. The asteroid was named after the Russian city of Chelyabinsk and for its spectacular Chelyabinsk meteor event in 2013.

    (89830) 2002 CE, provisional designation 2002 CE, is a stony asteroid, classified as near-Earth object and potentially hazardous asteroid of the Amor group, approximately 3.1 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 1 February 2002, by astronomers of the LINEAR program at Lincoln Laboratory's Experimental Test Site near Socorro, New Mexico, in the United States. This asteroid is one of the largest potentially hazardous asteroid known to exist.

    (164121) 2003 YT1, provisional designation 2003 YT1, is a bright asteroid and synchronous binary system on a highly eccentric orbit, classified as near-Earth object and potentially hazardous asteroid of the Apollo group, approximately 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) in diameter. It was discovered on 18 December 2003, by astronomers with the Catalina Sky Survey at the Catalina Station near Tucson, Arizona, in the United States. The V-type asteroid has a short rotation period of 2.3 hours. Its 210-meter sized minor-planet moon was discovered at Arecibo Observatory in May 2004.

    References

    1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 7482 (1994 PC1)" (2016-09-12 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 2 November 2017.
    2. 1 2 3 "7482 (1994 PC1)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 2 November 2017.
    3. 1 2 3 4 Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Cutri, R. M.; McMillan, R. S.; et al. (November 2012). "Physical Parameters of Asteroids Estimated from the WISE 3-Band Data and NEOWISE Post-Cryogenic Survey". The Astrophysical Journal Letters. 760 (1): 6. arXiv: 1210.0502 . Bibcode:2012ApJ...760L..12M. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/760/1/L12.
    4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "LCDB Data for (7482)". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 2 November 2017.
    5. 1 2 Pravec, Petr; Wolf, Marek; Sarounová, Lenka (November 1998). "Lightcurves of 26 Near-Earth Asteroids". Icarus. 136 (1): 124–153. Bibcode:1998Icar..136..124P. doi:10.1006/icar.1998.5993.