633

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
633 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 633
DCXXXIII
Ab urbe condita 1386
Armenian calendar 82
ԹՎ ՁԲ
Assyrian calendar 5383
Balinese saka calendar 554–555
Bengali calendar 40
Berber calendar 1583
Buddhist calendar 1177
Burmese calendar −5
Byzantine calendar 6141–6142
Chinese calendar 壬辰(Water  Dragon)
3329 or 3269
     to 
癸巳年 (Water  Snake)
3330 or 3270
Coptic calendar 349–350
Discordian calendar 1799
Ethiopian calendar 625–626
Hebrew calendar 4393–4394
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 689–690
 - Shaka Samvat 554–555
 - Kali Yuga 3733–3734
Holocene calendar 10633
Iranian calendar 11–12
Islamic calendar 11–12
Japanese calendar N/A
Javanese calendar 523–524
Julian calendar 633
DCXXXIII
Korean calendar 2966
Minguo calendar 1279 before ROC
民前1279年
Nanakshahi calendar −835
Seleucid era 944/945 AG
Thai solar calendar 1175–1176
Tibetan calendar 阳水龙年
(male Water-Dragon)
759 or 378 or −394
     to 
阴水蛇年
(female Water-Snake)
760 or 379 or −393
The Arab invasion of Khalid ibn al-Walid in Iraq Mohammad adil-Khalid's conquest of Iraq.PNG
The Arab invasion of Khalid ibn al-Walid in Iraq

Year 633 ( DCXXXIII ) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. The denomination 633 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

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The 630s decade ran from January 1, 630, to December 31, 639.

632 Calendar year

Year 632 (DCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 632 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

634 Calendar year

Year 634 (DCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 634 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Osric was a King of Deira in northern England. He was a cousin of king Edwin of Northumbria, being the son of Edwin's uncle Æthelric of Deira. Osric was also the father of Oswine.

Muslim conquest of Persia 7th-century invasion of Iran by the Arab Rashidun Caliphate

The Muslim conquest of Persia, also known as the Arab conquest of Iran, was carried out by the Rashidun Caliphate from 633 to 654 AD and led to the fall of the Sassanid Empire of Persia as well as the eventual decline of the Zoroastrian religion.

Battle of the Bridge

The Battle of the Bridge or the Battle of al-Jisr was a battle at the bank of the Euphrates river between Arab Muslims led by Abu Ubaid al-Thaqafi, and the Persian Sasanian forces led by Bahman Jaduya. It is traditionally dated to the year 634, and was the only major Sassanian victory over the Rashidun Caliphate army.

The Battle of River also known as Battle of Al Madhar took place in Mesopotamia (Iraq) between the forces of the Rashidun Caliphate and the Sasanian Empire. Muslims, under Khalid ibn al-Walid's command, defeated the numerically superior Persian army.

Battle of Walaja

The Battle of Walaja was a battle fought in Mesopotamia (Iraq) in May 633 between the Rashidun Caliphate army under Khalid ibn al-Walid and Al-Muthanna ibn Haritha against the Sassanid Empire and its Arab allies. In this battle the Sassanid army is said to have been two times the size of the Muslim army.

The Battle of Ayn al-Tamr took place in modern-day Iraq (Mesopotamia) between the early Muslim Arab forces and the Sassanians along with their Arab Christian auxiliary forces. Ayn al-Tamr is located west of Anbar and was a frontier post which had been established to aid the Sassanids.

The Battle of Daumat-ul-jandal took place between Muslims and Rebel Arab tribes in August 633 AD. This was a part of the Riddah wars. Daumat ul jandal was given to Iyad ibn Ghanm to crush the rebels, but he failed in doing so, and send for help to Khalid ibn Walid who was in Iraq in those days.

Battle of Muzayyah

Battle of Muzayyah was between the Muslim Arab army and the Sasanian Empire. When Khalid ibn Walid left from Ayn al-Tamr to Dumat Al-Jandal for the help of Iyad ibn Ghanm, the Persian court believed that Khalid had returned to Arabia with a large part of his army. The Persians decided to throw the Muslims back into the desert and regain the territories and the prestige which the Persian Empire had lost. The Persians had resolved not to fight Khalid again, but they were quite prepared to fight the Muslims without Khalid ibn al-Walid.

Battle of Saniyy

Battle of Saniyy was between the Muslim Arab army and the Sasanian Empire. When Khalid ibn Walid gone from Ayn al-Tamr to Dumat Al-Jandal for the help of Iyad ibn Ghanm, The Persian court believed that Khalid had returned to Arabia with a large part of his army, Persians decided to throw the Muslims back into the desert and regain the territories and the prestige which the Empire had lost. The Persians had resolved not to fight Khalid again, but they were quite prepared to fight the Muslims without Khalid ibn al-Walid. Khalid ibn al-Walid first defeated them at the battle of Muzayyah and then advanced towards Saniyy.

Battle of Zumail

The battle of Zumail was fought in 633 CE in Mesopotamia. It was a major Muslim victory in their conquest of that area. Under cover of night the Arab Muslims attacked the Christian-Arab forces, loyal to the Sasanian Empire, from three different sides. The Christian-Arab forces were unable to withstand the Muslim's surprise attack and soon dispersed but failed to escape from the battlefield and became the victims of a three sided attack by Khalid ibn al-Walid's army. At Zumail nearly the whole Christian Arab army was slaughtered by Khalid's Corps.

Muslim conquest of the Levant Conquest in the 7th century

The Muslim conquest of the Levant, also known as the Arab conquest of the Levant, occurred in the first half of the 7th century. This was the conquest of the region known as the Levant or Shaam, later to become the Islamic Province of Bilad al-Sham, as part of the Islamic conquests. Arab Muslim forces had appeared on the southern borders even before the death of Muhammad in 632, resulting in the Battle of Mu'tah in 629, but the real conquest began in 634 under his successors, the Rashidun Caliphs Abu Bakr and Umar ibn Khattab, with Khalid ibn al-Walid as their most important military leader.

Battle of Ullais

The Battle of Ullais was fought between the forces of the Rashidun Caliphate and the Sassanid Persian Empire in the middle of May 633 AD in Iraq, and is sometimes referred to as the Battle of Blood River since, as a result of the battle, there were enormous amounts of Sassanian and Arab Christian casualties.

Rashidun Caliphate The first major caliphate established after the death of the Islamic prophet Muhammad

The Rashidun Caliphate also known as the Rashidun Empire was the first of the four major caliphates established after the death of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. It was ruled by the first four successive caliphs (successors) of Muhammad after his death in 632 CE. These caliphs are collectively known in Sunni Islam as the Rashidun, or "Rightly Guided" caliphs.

Siege of Damascus (634) Battle in the Middle East

The siege of Damascus (634) lasted from 21 August to 19 September 634 before the city fell to the Rashidun Caliphate. Damascus was the first major city of the Eastern Roman Empire to fall in the Muslim conquest of Syria.

Battle of Chains

The Battle of Sallasil or the Battle of Chains was the first battle fought between the Rashidun Caliphate and the Sasanian Persian Empire. The battle was fought in Kazima soon after the Ridda Wars were over and Eastern Arabia was united under the authority of Caliph Abu Bakr. It was also the first battle of the Rashidun Caliphate in which the Muslim army sought to extend its frontiers.

Rashidun army Armed forces of the Muslim Rashidun Caliphate

The Rashidun army was the core of the Rashidun Caliphate's armed forces during the early Muslim conquests in the 7th century. The army is reported to have maintained a high level of discipline, strategic prowess and organization, granting them successive victories in their various campaigns.

Khalid ibn al-Walid ibn al-Mughira al-Makhzumi was an Arab Muslim commander in the service of the Islamic prophet Muhammad and the caliphs Abu Bakr and Umar who played a leading role in the Ridda wars against rebel tribes in Arabia in 632–633 and the early Muslim conquests of Sasanian Iraq in 633–634 and Byzantine Syria in 634–638.

References

  1. Bede Book III, Chapter I.
  2. Roberts, J: "History of the World." Penguin, 1994
  3. Campaigns in Eastern Iraq, "Khalifa Abu Bakr", Companion of the Prophet. Virtual library of Witness-Pioneer.
  4. al-Tabari Vol. 2, p. 562.
  5. The Caliphate, Its Rise, Decline, and Fall. From Original Sourcesby William Muir, p. 56
  6. Annals of the Early Caliphate by William Muir, p. 85
  7. Thompson, E. A. (1969) "The Goths in Spain". Oxford: Clarendon Press
  8. Bede Book II, Chapter XX.

Sources

  • Bede. "Book II". Ecclesiastical History of the English People . Internet History Sourcebooks Project.
  • Bede. "Book III". Ecclesiastical History of the English People . Internet History Sourcebooks Project.
  • al-Tabari. History of the Prophets and Kings . 2.[ full citation needed ]