Battle of Sehested

Last updated

Battle of Sehested
Part of the War of the Sixth Coalition
Slaget ved Sehested.jpeg
Slaget ved Sehested by Jørgen V. Sonne
Date10 December 1813
Location
Result Danish victory
Belligerents
Flag of Denmark.svg Denmark–Norway Flag of Russia.svg Russia
Flag of the Kingdom of Prussia (1803-1892).svg Prussia
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Britain
Commanders and leaders
Flag of Denmark.svg Prince Frederik of Hesse Flag of Russia.svg Ludwig von Wallmoden-Gimborn
Strength
9,000 [1] –11,000 men [2] 10,000 [2] –10,500 men [1]
Casualties and losses
469–534:

50 [3] –69 killed [2]
273 [3] –319 wounded [2]
146 missing [2]
1,122:

522 killed and wounded,
600 captured [2]
Memorial in Sehestedt Sehestedt, Denkmal fur das Gefecht in Sehestedt NIK 2513.JPG
Memorial in Sehestedt

The Battle of Sehested was fought between Danish and Russian-Prussian-British troops at Sehested (in Holstein) on 10 December 1813 during the War of the Sixth Coalition.

Denmark constitutional monarchy in Europe

Denmark, officially the Kingdom of Denmark, is a Nordic country and the southernmost of the Scandinavian nations. Denmark lies southwest of Sweden and south of Norway, and is bordered to the south by Germany. The Kingdom of Denmark also comprises two autonomous constituent countries in the North Atlantic Ocean: the Faroe Islands and Greenland. Denmark proper consists of a peninsula, Jutland, and an archipelago of 443 named islands, with the largest being Zealand, Funen and the North Jutlandic Island. The islands are characterised by flat, arable land and sandy coasts, low elevation and a temperate climate. Denmark has a total area of 42,924 km2 (16,573 sq mi), land area of 42,394 km2 (16,368 sq mi), and the total area including Greenland and the Faroe Islands is 2,210,579 km2 (853,509 sq mi), and a population of 5.8 million.

Russian Empire Former country, 1721–1917

The Russian Empire, also known as Imperial Russia or simply Russia, was an empire that existed across Eurasia and North America from 1721, following the end of the Great Northern War, until the Republic was proclaimed by the Provisional Government that took power after the February Revolution of 1917.

Kingdom of Prussia Former German state (1701–1918)

The Kingdom of Prussia was a German kingdom that constituted the state of Prussia between 1701 and 1918. It was the driving force behind the unification of Germany in 1871 and was the leading state of the German Empire until its dissolution in 1918. Although it took its name from the region called Prussia, it was based in the Margraviate of Brandenburg, where its capital was Berlin.

Contents

The Danish Auxiliary Corps, which fought on the side of the French, was pushed back by the allies under Major General Ludwig von Wallmoden-Gimborn in early December 1813, but the Danes, commanded by Prince Frederik of Hesse, managed to secure their retreat by the victory in the Battle of Sehested.

First French Empire Empire of Napoleon I of France between 1804–1815

The First French Empire, officially the French Empire, was the empire of Napoleon Bonaparte of France and the dominant power in much of continental Europe at the beginning of the 19th century. Although France had already established an overseas colonial empire beginning in the 17th century, the French state had remained a kingdom under the Bourbons and a republic after the Revolution. Historians refer to Napoleon's regime as the First Empire to distinguish it from the restorationist Second Empire (1852–1870) ruled by his nephew as Napoleon III.

Ludwig von Wallmoden-Gimborn Austrian general

Ludwig Georg Thedel Graf von Wallmoden was an Austrian "General of the Cavalry", best known for his training of light infantry and the refinement of the Tirailleur system.

Prince Frederik of Hesse Danish noble and general

Prince Frederik of Hesse, Count or Landgreve Friedrich of Hesse-Cassel was a Danish-German nobleman, general and governor-general of Norway (1810–1813) and the same in the duchies of Schleswig and Holstein (1836–1842).

However, the battle could not change the course of the war, which ended in Denmark’s defeat in 1814.

The Danish casualties were 469–534 men. The allies lost 1,122 men. [3] [2]

Orders of Battle

Danish force

Avant Garde Brigade:

1st Brigade: General Graf Schulenburg

2nd. Brigade General Lasson

Train Guard

Total: 9,000 men [1]

Allied force

Total: 10,500 men [1]

See also

Related Research Articles

Kings German Legion military unit

The King's German Legion (KGL) was a British Army unit of mostly expatriate German personnel during the period 1803–16. The Legion achieved the distinction of being the only German force to fight without interruption against the French during the Napoleonic Wars.

Royal Danish Army land warfare branch of Denmarks military

The Royal Danish Army is the land-based branch of the Danish Defence, together with the Danish Home Guard. For the last decade, the Royal Danish Army has undergone a massive transformation of structures, equipment and training methods, abandoning its traditional role of anti-invasion defence, and instead focusing on out of area operations by, among other initiatives, reducing the size of the conscripted and reserve components and increasing the active component, changing from 60% support structure and 40% operational capability, to 60% combat operational capability and 40% support structure. When fully implemented, the Danish Army will be capable of deploying 1,500 troops permanently on three different continents continuously, or 5,000 troops for a shorter period of time, in international operations without any need for extraordinary measures such as parliamentary approval of a war funding bill.

Guard Hussar Regiment (Denmark)

The Guard Hussar Regiment is a special cavalry unit of the Royal Danish Army, the primary task is to train the Guard Hussars for various functions in the mobilisation force. The Guard Hussars are one of two active cavalry regiments of the Danish Army, and was formed in 2001 through the amalgamation of the original Guard Hussars regiment, Zealand Life Regiment and Danish Life Regiment.

This is the complete order of battle of the French and Third Coalition armies during the Battle of Austerlitz.

The Danish Division, short DDIV, is the only remaining military land division in Denmark. It is also the most potent single formation of the Danish armed forces. It was created on 1 January 1997 as the successor of Jutland Division. It is one of the now-two Divisions of Multinational Corps North East, the German-Danish-Polish Corps, the successor to the former German-Danish Allied Land Forces Schleswig-Holstein and Jutland (LANDJUT), a NATO Allied Forces Northern Europe formation.

Combat of the Côa

The Combat of the Côa was a skirmish that occurred during the Peninsular War period of the Napoleonic Wars. It took place in the valley of the Côa River and it was the first significant battle for the new army of 65,000 men controlled by Marshal André Masséna, as the French prepared for their third invasion of Portugal.

The 1st Cavalry Division was a regular Division of the British Army during the First World War where it fought on the Western Front. During the Second World War it was a first line formation, formed from Yeomanry Regiments. It fought in the Middle East before being converted to the 10th Armoured Division.

The following units of the German First Army and British Expeditionary Force fought in the Battle of Mons in World War I.

This is an order of battle of the French and German Armies at the beginning of the Franco-Prussian War in 1870.

Northumberland Hussars

The Northumberland Hussars is a British Territorial Army Squadron equipped with FV107 Scimitar and FV103 Spartan armoured reconnaissance vehicles. The squadron is part of The Queen's Own Yeomanry (QOY), a Formation Reconnaissance Regiment. The 'Hussars' are based in Newcastle upon Tyne.

The Battle of Arroyo dos Molinos took place on 28 October 1811 during the Peninsular War. An allied force under General Rowland Hill trapped and defeated a French force under General Jean-Baptiste Girard, forcing the latter's dismissal by the Emperor Napoleon. A whole French infantry division and a brigade of cavalry were destroyed as viable fighting formations.

The Battle of Køge was a battle on 29 August 1807 between British troops besieging Copenhagen and Danish militia raised on Sjælland. It ended in British victory and is also known as 'Træskoslaget' or 'the Clogs Battle', since many of the Danish militiamen threw their heavy wooden clogs away when they were fleeing.

Allied Forces Baltic Approaches

Allied Forces Baltic Approaches (BALTAP) was a Principal Subordinate Command (PSC) of the NATO Military Command Structure, with responsibility for the Baltic Sea area. It was in existence from 1962 to 2002 and consisted of the Danish Armed Forces, units of the West German Bundeswehr and allied wartime reinforcements.

Abensberg 1809 Order of Battle

The Battle of Abensberg was fought on 20 April 1809, between an Allied force under the command of Emperor Napoleon I of France on one side and three Austrian corps led by Johann von Hiller, Archduke Louis of Austria, and Michael von Kienmayer. The Austrians formed the left wing of Archduke Charles, Duke of Teschen's main army and were under the overall command of Hiller. Napoleon's French troops, reinforced by troops from the Kingdom of Bavaria and the Kingdom of Württemberg outfought their opponents, inflicted heavy losses, and forced the Austrians to retreat to the southeast.

The Battle of Sacile saw the Franco-Italian Army of Italy commanded by Eugène de Beauharnais face the Archduke John of Austria's Army of Inner Austria during the War of the Fifth Coalition. Believing that he was only opposed by the Austrian VIII Armeekorps, Eugène launched his right wing in a heavy attack against it. In the morning, the Austrians successfully held off Franco-Italian assaults on their left flank as Eugène reinforced the attack with troops from his left wing. Later in the day, John counterattacked Eugène's weakened left wing with the IX Armeekorps, forcing the Franco-Italian army to withdraw from the battlefield. The battle at Sacile was preceded by the action of Pordenone on 15 April in which the Austrian advance guard mauled the French rear guard. The Austrian victory compelled Eugène to retreat to the Adige River at Verona where he gathered reinforcements and planned a counteroffensive.

Jena–Auerstedt campaign order of battle

The Jena-Auerstedt Campaign Order of Battle is listed below. The order of battle includes units from the First French Empire and the Kingdom of Prussia that fought each other in the campaign that included the decisive Battle of Jena-Auerstedt on 14 October 1806. The order of battle may be useful to trace the battles of Schleiz and Saalfeld, which occurred before Jena-Auerstedt, as well as battles and capitulations that happened after 14 October, such as Erfurt, Halle, Prenzlau, Pasewalk, Stettin, Waren-Nossentin, and Lübeck.

The Piave River 1809 Order of Battle shows the units and organization for the Franco-Italian and Austrian Empire armies that fought in the Battle of Piave River on 8 May 1809. Eugène de Beauharnais, the viceroy of the Kingdom of Italy defeated Archduke John of Austria. Eugène's Advance Guard crossed the river first and was assailed by Austrian cavalry and artillery. The French cavalry routed the opposing cavalry and captured 14 enemy guns. A lull followed as John arranged his infantry in a formidable defensive position. Meanwhile, Eugène struggled to pour reinforcements into the bridgehead as the Piave rose dangerously. In the afternoon, the viceroy sent Paul Grenier to drive back the Austrian left while Jacques MacDonald mounted an assault on the center. The attack succeeded in breaking the Austrian line and compelling John to order a retreat.

The VII Corps of the Grande Armée was the name of a French military unit that existed during the Napoleonic Wars. It was formed in 1805 and assigned to Marshal Pierre Augereau. From 1805 through 1807, Augereau led the army corps in the War of the Third Coalition and the War of the Fourth Coalition. It was disbanded after being nearly wiped out at the Battle of Eylau in February 1807 and its surviving troops were distributed to other army corps. At the end of 1808, the VII Corps was reconstituted in Catalonia during the Peninsular War and Laurent Gouvion Saint-Cyr was given command. The corps fought in Spain until 1811, when it was renamed the Army of Catalonia. At that time it was again led by Augereau.

The VIII Corps of the Grande Armée was the name of a French military unit that existed during the Napoleonic Wars. Emperor Napoleon formed it in 1805 by borrowing divisions from other corps and assigned it to Marshal Édouard Adolphe Casimir Joseph Mortier. Marshal André Masséna's Army of Italy was also reorganized as the VIII Corps at the end of the 1805 campaign. The corps was reformed for the 1806 campaign under Mortier and spent the rest of the year mopping up Prussian garrisons in western Germany.

First Battle of Bir el Gubi

The First Battle of Bir el Gubi took place on 19 November 1941 near Bir el Gubi, Libya. It was one of the opening engagements of Operation Crusader and the first tank battle in North Africa where Italian armoured forces achieved a success, after their previous poor performance during Operation Compass.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 Allen, Colin. "Sehested, 10th December 1813" (PDF). 113ème Régiment d’Infanterie de Ligne. Retrieved 3 September 2018.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Sune Wadskjær Nielsen. Det danske rytteri: De lette dragoners triumftog. Lindhardt og Ringhof, 2014. pp. 1–3
  3. 1 2 3 Den store danske. Sehested (Den Store Danske Encyklopædi, Gyldendals Leksikon, 1-3 and Gyldendals Etbindsleksikon)

Coordinates: 54°22′00″N9°49′00″E / 54.3667°N 9.8167°E / 54.3667; 9.8167

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.