Battle of La Suffel

Last updated
Battle of La Suffel
Part of the Napoleonic Wars
Date28 June 1815
Location
Result French victory
Belligerents
Flag of France.svg French Empire

Seventh Coalition :

Commanders and leaders
Flag of France.svg Jean Rapp
Flag of France.svg Henri Rottembourg
Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy.svg Crown Prince of Württemberg [1]
Units involved
V Corps III Corps of the Upper Rhine Army
Strength
About 20,000 [1] [2] About 40,000 [1]
Casualties and losses
~3,000 [1] 75 officers and 2,050 men [1]

The Battle of La Suffel was a French victory over Austrian forces of the Seventh Coalition and the last French pitched battle victory in the Napoleonic Wars. It was fought on 28 June 1815 at Souffelweyersheim and Hoenheim, near Strasbourg.

A pitched battle or set piece battle is a battle in which both sides choose the fighting location and time. Either side has the option to disengage before the battle starts or shortly thereafter.

Napoleonic Wars Series of early 19th century European wars

The Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) were a series of major conflicts pitting the French Empire and its allies, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, financed and usually led by the United Kingdom. The wars stemmed from the unresolved disputes associated with the French Revolution and its resultant conflict. The wars are often categorised into five conflicts, each termed after the coalition that fought Napoleon: the Third Coalition (1805), the Fourth (1806–07), the Fifth (1809), the Sixth (1813), and the Seventh (1815).

Souffelweyersheim Commune in Grand Est, France

Souffelweyersheim is a commune in the Bas-Rhin department in Grand Est in north-eastern France, and is part of metropolitan Strasbourg.

Contents

During the Hundred Days, General Jean Rapp rallied to Napoleon Bonaparte and was given command of the V Corps (also known as the Army of the Rhine), consisting of about 20,000 men. He was ordered to observe the border near Strasbourg, [3] and to defend the Vosges. Ten days after Waterloo (in which his corps took no part), he met the III Corps of the Austrian Upper Rhine Army under the command of the Crown Prince of Württemberg near Strasbourg and defeated them at the Battle of La Suffel. [1]

Hundred Days Period from Napoleons escape from Elba to the second restoration of King Louis XVIII

The Hundred Days marked the period between Napoleon's return from exile on the island of Elba to Paris on 20 March 1815 and the second restoration of King Louis XVIII on 8 July 1815. This period saw the War of the Seventh Coalition, and includes the Waterloo Campaign, the Neapolitan War as well as several other minor campaigns. The phrase les Cent Jours was first used by the prefect of Paris, Gaspard, comte de Chabrol, in his speech welcoming the king back to Paris on 8 July.

Jean Rapp French general

General Count Jean Rapp was a French Army officer during the French Revolutionary Wars and the Napoleonic Wars.

Vosges Mountain range in France

The Vosges are a range of low mountains in eastern France, near its border with Germany. Together with the Palatine Forest to the north on the German side of the border, they form a single geomorphological unit and low mountain range of around 8,000 km2 (3,100 sq mi) in area. It runs in a north-northeast direction from the Burgundian Gate to the Börrstadt Basin, and forms the western boundary of the Upper Rhine Plain.

Notes

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References

<i>Encyclopædia Britannica</i> Eleventh Edition 1910 Encyclopedia

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William Siborne, Sibourne or Siborn was a British officer and military historian whose most notable work was a history of the Waterloo Campaign.

Digby Smith is a British military historian. The son of a British career soldier, he was born in Hampshire, England, but spent several years in India and Pakistan as a child and youth. As a "boy soldier," he entered training in the British Army at the age of 16. He was later commissioned in the Royal Corps of Signals, and held several postings with the British Army of the Rhine.

Further reading

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The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.

Coordinates: 48°38′08″N7°44′30″E / 48.6356°N 7.7417°E / 48.6356; 7.7417

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.