Carlo Pietzner

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Carlo Pietzner

Carlo Pietzner, born in Vienna, Austria, 26 January 1915 and died in Copake, New York, 17 April 1986, was a co-founder of Camphill, artist, anthroposophist, and a Special Needs and adult educator.

Vienna Capital city and state in Austria

Vienna is the federal capital and largest city of Austria, and one of the nine states of Austria. Vienna is Austria's primate city, with a population of about 1.9 million, and its cultural, economic, and political centre. It is the 7th-largest city by population within city limits in the European Union. Until the beginning of the 20th century, it was the largest German-speaking city in the world, and before the splitting of the Austro-Hungarian Empire in World War I, the city had 2 million inhabitants. Today, it has the second largest number of German speakers after Berlin. Vienna is host to many major international organizations, including the United Nations and OPEC. The city is located in the eastern part of Austria and is close to the borders of the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Hungary. These regions work together in a European Centrope border region. Along with nearby Bratislava, Vienna forms a metropolitan region with 3 million inhabitants. In 2001, the city centre was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site. In July 2017 it was moved to the list of World Heritage in Danger.

Austria Federal republic in Central Europe

Austria, officially the Republic of Austria, is a country in Central Europe comprising 9 federated states. Its capital, largest city and one of nine states is Vienna. Austria has an area of 83,879 km2 (32,386 sq mi), a population of nearly 9 million people and a nominal GDP of $477 billion. It is bordered by the Czech Republic and Germany to the north, Hungary and Slovakia to the east, Slovenia and Italy to the south, and Switzerland and Liechtenstein to the west. The terrain is highly mountainous, lying within the Alps; only 32% of the country is below 500 m (1,640 ft), and its highest point is 3,798 m (12,461 ft). The majority of the population speaks local Bavarian dialects as their native language, and German in its standard form is the country's official language. Other regional languages are Hungarian, Burgenland Croatian, and Slovene.

Copake, New York Town in New York, United States

Copake is a town in Columbia County, New York, United States. The population was 3,615 at the 2010 census. The town derives its name from a lake, which was known to the natives as Cook-pake, or Ack-kook-peek, meaning "Snake Pond".

Contents

Biography

Carlo Pietzner spent his youth in Vienna in the years between the two wars and completed his art studies at the Kunstgewerbschule, (today the University of Applied Arts Vienna), meeting there, amongst others Robert Musil and Oskar Kokoshka. His family ran a photographic studio, which his sister later took over. Through his friend Peter Roth he was introduced to Dr Karl König and joined the youth group that had gathered around him. This group met for the last time in Vienna on March 11, 1938 at the time of the Nazi occupation. The members left Austria along various routes to come together again in Aberdeen and found Camphill. Carlo arrived there in 1941 and was shortly thereafter interned in Canada. [1] He became the Principal of Heachcot School that cared for about 50 severely handicapped individuals and already there pioneered a color and light therapy that he later developed together with Edmund Pracht. [2]

The University of Applied Arts Vienna is an arts university and institution of higher education in Vienna, the capital of Austria. It has had university status since 1970.

Robert Musil Austrian writer

Robert Musil was an Austrian philosophical writer. His unfinished novel The Man Without Qualities is generally considered to be one of the most important and influential modernist novels.

Karl König was an Austrian paediatrician who founded the Camphill Movement, an international movement of therapeutic intentional communities for those with special needs or disabilities.

In 1954 he was asked to start the Camphill work in Glencraig, Northern Ireland, becoming increasingly involved in the training and administrative work of the international Camphill movement. In 1961 he moved to the United States with his family and a small group of co-workers to lead the expansion of Camphill on that continent beginning with Camphill Village Copake. In 1963 he helped found Camphill Beaver Run focusing his attention on community development work, artistic activity and lecturing.

Northern Ireland Part of the United Kingdom lying in the north-east of the island of Ireland, created 1921

Northern Ireland is a part of the United Kingdom in the north-east of the island of Ireland, variously described as a country, province or region. Northern Ireland shares a border to the south and west with the Republic of Ireland. In 2011, its population was 1,810,863, constituting about 30% of the island's total population and about 3% of the UK's population. Established by the Northern Ireland Act 1998 as part of the Good Friday Agreement, the Northern Ireland Assembly holds responsibility for a range of devolved policy matters, while other areas are reserved for the British government. Northern Ireland co-operates with the Republic of Ireland in some areas, and the Agreement granted the Republic the ability to "put forward views and proposals" with "determined efforts to resolve disagreements between the two governments".

Besides his work in Camphill, he was active in building up the local and international work of the Anthroposophical Society, serving on its American Council in the 1960s and again between 1981-1983 and supporting the founding of the Section for Curative Education and Social Therapy in Dornach, Switzerland within the Medical Section of the School of Spiritual Science.

The General Anthroposophical Society is an "association of people whose will it is to nurture the life of the soul, both in the individual and in human society, on the basis of a true knowledge of the spiritual world." As an organization, it is dedicated to supporting the community of those interested in the inner path of schooling known as anthroposophy, developed by Rudolf Steiner.

Dornach Place in Solothurn, Switzerland

Dornach is a municipality in the district of Dorneck in the canton of Solothurn in Switzerland.

Switzerland federal republic in Western Europe

Switzerland, officially the Swiss Confederation, is a country situated in western, central and southern Europe. It consists of 26 cantons, and the city of Bern is the seat of the federal authorities. The sovereign state is a federal republic bordered by Italy to the south, France to the west, Germany to the north, and Austria and Liechtenstein to the east. Switzerland is a landlocked country geographically divided between the Alps, the Swiss Plateau and the Jura, spanning a total area of 41,285 km2 (15,940 sq mi). While the Alps occupy the greater part of the territory, the Swiss population of approximately 8.5 million people is concentrated mostly on the plateau, where the largest cities are to be found: among them are the two global cities and economic centres Zürich and Geneva.

In the 1970s Carlo initiated art retreats for Camphill coworkers, wrote and directed plays to develop the cultural life of the communities, wrote books and poetry, produced a large number of paintings and sketches and took on stained glass commissions for Camphill Halls in Germany, Switzerland, Norway and other countries. He provided architectural guidance for many buildings and concerned himself with the artistic and innovative formation of social and community life in Camphill.

Under his leadership the Camphill Association of North America was formed in 1983, which he directed until his death in 1986. He had already begun to withdraw from active involvement in Copake, making way for a younger generation of leaders. His lecturing and training activities continued amongst a growing circle of friends and acquaintances all over the world.

Published work

International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.

Related Research Articles

Anthroposophy philosophy founded by Rudolf Steiner

Anthroposophy is a philosophy founded by the 19th century esotericist Rudolf Steiner that postulates the existence of an objective, intellectually comprehensible spiritual world, accessible to human experience. Followers of anthroposophy aim to develop mental faculties of spiritual discovery through a mode of thought independent of sensory experience. They also aim to present their ideas in a manner verifiable by rational discourse and specifically seek a precision and clarity in studying the spiritual world mirroring that obtained by natural historians in investigations of the physical world.

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References

  1. ‘’The Builders of Camphill: Lives and Destinies of the Founders’’ Edited by Friedwart Bock, Floris Books, 2004 ISBN   9780863154423
  2. Article by Cornelius Peitzner in the Forschungsstelle Kulturimpuls - Biographien Dokumentation retrieved 2015.03.05