Connecticut's at-large congressional district

Last updated
Connecticut's at-largeth congressional district
Obsolete district
Representative
 {{{representative}}}
Created1789
1900
1930
Eliminated1837
1910
1960
Years active1789-1837
1903-1913
1933-1965

During the first twenty-four Congresses (March 4, 1789 until March 3, 1837) Connecticut elected all its Representatives in Congress from a single multi-member Connecticut at-large congressional district.

Contents

Connecticut elected a varying number of representatives during this period. From its inception in 1789 through the first reapportionment in 1793, there were five seats. From 1793 through 1823, there were seven seats. In 1823 the seats were reduced to six and in 1837 the system of at-large members was replaced with districts.

From 1903 to 1913 and from 1933 to 1965, Connecticut had a member of the United States House of Representatives who represented the state at-large, in addition to the members who represented distinct districts.

List of representatives

1789–1837: five, then seven, then six seats

All members were elected statewide at-large on a general ticket.

Congress and years
Seat ASeat BSeat CSeat DSeat ESeat FSeat G
Rep.PartyElectoral historyRep.PartyElectoral historyRep.PartyElectoral historyRep.PartyElectoral historyRep.PartyElectoral historyRep.PartyElectoral historyRep.PartyElectoral history
1st March 4, 1789 –
March 3, 1791
Benjamin Huntington.JPG
Benjamin Huntington
Pro-Admin Elected in 1788.
Lost re-election.
RogerShermanPortrait.jpg
Roger Sherman
Pro-Admin Elected in 1788.
Re-elected in 1790, [1] but instead resigned to become U.S. Senator.
Jonathan Sturges Pro-Admin Elected in 1788.
Re-elected in 1790.
Re-elected in 1792 but declined to serve.
JonathanTrumbull.jpg
Jonathan Trumbull Jr.
Pro-Admin Elected in 1788.
Re-elected in 1790.
Re-elected in 1792.
Re-elected in 1794 but declined to serve when instead elected U.S. Senator.
Jeremiah Wadsworth Pro-Admin Elected in 1788.
Initially lost re-election but was re-elected in 1790 to finish the term of Pierpont Edwards (Pro-Administration), who had declined to serve.
Re-elected again in 1790.
Re-elected in 1792.
Retired.
Seat created in 1793.Seat created in 1793.
2nd March 4, 1791 –
March 3, 1793
James Hillhouse of New Haven Connecticut.jpg
James Hillhouse
Pro-Admin Elected in 1790.
Re-elected in 1792.
Re-elected in 1794.
Resigned when elected U.S. Senator.
Amasa Learned Pro-Admin Elected to finish Sherman's term.
Re-elected in 1792.
Retired.
3rd March 4, 1793 –
March 3, 1795
Joshua Coit Pro-Admin Elected in 1792.
Re-elected in 1794.
Re-elected in 1796.
Died.
Zephaniah Swift Pro-Admin Elected in 1792.
Re-elected in 1794.
Re-elected in 1796 but declined to serve.
UriahTracy.jpg
Uriah Tracy
Pro-Admin Elected in 1792.
Re-elected in 1794.
Resigned when elected U.S. Senator.
4th March 4, 1795 –
April 13, 1795
Federalist Chauncey Goodrich.jpg
Chauncey Goodrich
Federalist Elected in 1794.
Re-elected in 1796.
Re-elected in 1798.
Lost re-election.
FederalistVacant Nathaniel Smith Federalist Elected in 1794.
Elected in 1796.
Lost re-election.
FederalistFederalist
April 13, 1795 –
October 13, 1796
Roger Griswold Federalist Elected to finish Trumbull's term.
Re-elected in 1796.
Re-elected in 1798.
Re-elected in 1800.
Re-elected in 1802.
Re-elected in 1804 but resigned.
October 13, 1796 –
December 5, 1796
Vacant
December 5, 1796 –
January 3, 1797
James Davenport Federalist Elected to finish Hillhouse's term, having already been elected to the next term, see below.
Elected in 1796.
Died.
January 3, 1797 –
March 3, 1797
SamuelDana.jpg
Samuel W. Dana
Federalist Elected to finish Tracy's term.
Re-elected in 1796.
Re-elected in 1798.
Re-elected in 1800.
Re-elected in 1802.
Re-elected in 1804.
Re-elected in 1806.
Re-elected in 1808.
Resigned to become U.S. Senator.
5th March 4, 1797 –
August 3, 1797
John Allen FederalistElected to finish Swift's term.
Retired.
August 3, 1797 –
November 13, 1797
Vacant
November 13, 1797 –
September 5, 1798
William Edmond Federalist Elected to finish Davenport's term.
Re-elected in 1798.
Retired.
September 5, 1798 –
December 3, 1798
Vacant
December 3, 1798 –
March 3, 1799
Jonathan Brace Federalist Elected in 1798.
Later elected to finish Coit's term.
Resigned.
6th March 4, 1799 –
?
Elizur Goodrich The Connecticut Quarterly, July, August, September 1898 p. 307.jpg Elizur Goodrich Federalist Elected in 1798.
Re-elected in 1800 but declined to serve.
John Davenport by Ralph Earl 1794.jpeg
John Davenport
Elected in 1798.
Re-elected in 1800.
Re-elected in 1802.
Re-elected in 1804.
Re-elected in 1806.
Re-elected in 1808.
Re-elected in 1810.
Re-elected in 1812.
Re-elected in 1814.
Retired.
 ? 1800 –
November 17, 1800
Vacant
November 17, 1800 –
March 3, 1801
John Cotton Smith engraving.png
John Cotton Smith
Federalist Elected to finish Brace's term.
Elected in 1800 to the next term.
Re-elected in 1802.
Re-elected in 1804.
Resigned.
7th March 4, 1801 –
May 14, 1801
Vacant Elias Perkins Federalist Elected in 1800.
Re-elected in 1802 but declined to serve.
Vacant
May 14, 1801 –
September 21, 1801
Calvin Goddard Federalist Elected to finish Goodrich's term.
Re-elected in 1802.
Re-elected in 1804 but resigned.
September 21, 1801 –
March 3, 1803
Benjamin Tallmadge by Ezra Ames.JPG
Benjamin Tallmadge
Federalist Elected to finish Edmond's term.
Re-elected in 1802.
Re-elected in 1804.
Re-elected in 1806.
Re-elected in 1808.
Re-elected in 1810.
Re-elected in 1812.
Re-elected in 1814.
Retired.
8th March 4, 1803 –
March 3, 1805
Unidentified Artist - Simeon Baldwin - S-NPG.82.1 - National Portrait Gallery.jpg
Simeon Baldwin
Federalist Elected to finish Perkins's term.
Retired.
9th March 4, 1805 –
?before September 16, 1805
Jonathan O. Moseley Federalist Elected in 1804.
Re-elected in 1806.
Re-elected in 1808.
Re-elected in 1810.
Re-elected in 1812.
Re-elected in 1814.
Re-elected in 1816.
Re-elected in 1818 as a Democratic-Republican.
Retired.
?before September 16, 1805 –
September 16, 1805
VacantVacant
September 16, 1805 –
August 1806
TimothyPitkin.jpg
Timothy Pitkin
Federalist Elected to finish Griswold's term.
Re-elected in 1806.
Re-elected in 1808.
Re-elected in 1810.
Re-elected in 1812.
Re-elected in 1814.
Re-elected in 1816.
Retired.
Lewis B. Sturges Federalist Elected to finish Goddard's term.
Re-elected in 1806.
Re-elected in 1808.
Re-elected in 1810.
Re-elected in 1812.
Re-elected in 1814.
Lost re-election.
August 1806 –
December 1, 1806
Vacant
December 1, 1806 –
March 3, 1807
Theodore Dwight.jpg
Theodore Dwight
Federalist Elected to finish Smith's term.
Retired.
10th March 4, 1807 –
March 3, 1809
Anson Dickinson - Portrait of Epaphroditus Champion in 1825.jpg
Epaphroditus Champion
Federalist Elected in 1806.
Re-elected in 1808.
Re-elected in 1810.
Re-elected in 1812.
Re-elected in 1814.
Lost re-election.
11th March 4, 1809 –
May 10, 1810
May 10, 1810 –
October 11, 1810
Vacant
October 11, 1810 –
March 3, 1811
John Trumbull - Brigadier General Ebenezer Huntington - y1976-10 - Princeton University Art Museum.jpg
Ebenezer Huntington
Federalist Elected September 17, 1810 to finish Dana's term (seated October 11, 1810).
Not also elected to the next term.
12th March 4, 1811 –
March 3, 1813
Lyman Law Federalist Elected in 1810.
Re-elected in 1812.
Re-elected in 1814.
Lost re-election.
13th March 4, 1813 –
March 3, 1815
14th March 4, 1815 –
March 3, 1817
15th March 4, 1817 –
? 1818
Thomas scott williams.png
Thomas Scott Williams
Federalist Elected in 1816.
Retired.
Uriel Holmes Federalist Elected in 1816.
Resigned.
Samuel B. Sherwood Federalist Elected in 1816.
Retired.
Nathaniel Terry Federalist Elected to finish the term of member-elect Charles Dennison, who had declined the seat.
Retired.
Ebenezer Huntington Federalist Elected to finish the term of member-elect Sylvanus Backus, who had died.
Retired.
 ? 1818 –
November 16, 1818
Vacant
November 16, 1818 –
March 3, 1819
Sylvester Gilbert Democratic-Republican Elected to finish Holmes's term.
Was not elected to the next term.
16th March 4, 1819 –
March 3, 1821
Gideon Tomlinson (Conn. Rep., Gov., US Sen.).jpg
Gideon Tomlinson
Democratic-Republican Elected in 1818.
Re-elected in 1821.
Re-elected in 1823.
Re-elected in 1825.
Retired.
Democratic-Republican Samuel Augustus Foot.jpg
Samuel A. Foot
Democratic-Republican Elected in 1818.
Lost re-election.
John Russ Democratic-Republican Elected in 1818.
Re-elected in 1821.
Lost re-election.
James Stevens Democratic-Republican Elected in 1818.
Retired.
Elisha Phelps.jpg
Elisha Phelps
Democratic-Republican Elected in 1818.
Lost re-election.
HenryEdwards.jpg
Henry W. Edwards
Democratic-Republican Elected in 1818.
Re-elected in 1821.
Lost re-election.
17th March 4, 1821 –
March 3, 1823
Ansel Sterling Democratic-Republican Elected in 1821.
Re-elected in 1823.
Retired.
Daniel Burrows Democratic-Republican Elected in 1821.
Lost re-election.
Noyes Barber Democratic-Republican Elected in 1821.
Re-elected in 1823.
Re-elected in 1825.
Re-elected in 1827.
Re-elected in 1829.
Re-elected in 1831.
Re-elected in 1833.
Lost re-election.
Ebenezer Stoddard Democratic-Republican Elected in 1821.
Re-elected in 1823.
Retired.
18th March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
Samuel Augustus Foot.jpg
Samuel A. Foot
Democratic-Republican Elected in 1823.
Lost re-election.
Lemuel Whitman Democratic-Republican Elected in 1823.
Retired.
Seat eliminated in 1823.
19th March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1827
Anti-Jacksonian John Baldwin Anti-Jacksonian Elected in 1825.
Re-elected in 1827.
Retired.
Ralph I. Ingersoll Anti-Jacksonian Elected in 1825.
Re-elected in 1827.
Re-elected in 1829.
Re-elected in 1831.
Retired.
Orange Merwin Anti-Jacksonian Elected in 1825.
Re-elected in 1827.
Lost re-election.
Anti-Jacksonian Elisha Phelps.jpg
Elisha Phelps
Anti-Jacksonian Elected in 1825.
Re-elected in 1827.
Lost re-election.
20th March 4, 1827 –
March 3, 1829
David Plant Anti-Jacksonian Elected in 1827.
Retired.
21st March 4, 1829 –
March 3, 1831
William Wolcott Ellsworth.jpeg
William W. Ellsworth
Anti-Jacksonian Elected in 1829.
Re-elected in 1831.
Re-elected in 1833.
Resigned.
Jabez Williams Huntington.jpg
Jabez W. Huntington
Anti-Jacksonian Elected in 1829.
Re-elected in 1831.
Re-elected in 1833.
Resigned to become judge of the Connecticut Supreme Court of Errors.
Ebenezer Young Anti-Jacksonian Elected in 1829.
Re-elected in 1831.
Re-elected in 1833.
Lost re-election.
William L. Storrs Anti-Jacksonian Elected in 1829.
Re-elected in 1831.
[ data unknown/missing ]
22nd March 4, 1831 –
March 3, 1833
23rd March 4, 1833 –
May 9, 1834
Samuel Augustus Foot.jpg
Samuel A. Foot
Anti-Jacksonian Elected in 1833.
Resigned to become Governor of Connecticut.
Samuel Tweedy Anti-Jacksonian Elected in 1833.
Lost re-election.
May 9, 1834 –
July 8, 1834
Vacant
July 8, 1834 –
August 16, 1834
Vacant
August 16, 1834 –
December 1, 1834
Vacant
December 1, 1834 –
March 3, 1835
Joseph Trumbull Connecticut Governor.jpg
Joseph Trumbull
Anti-Jacksonian Elected to finish Ellsworth's term.
Lost re-election.
Phineas Miner Anti-Jacksonian Elected to finish Huntington's term.
Retired.
Ebenezer Jackson Jr. Anti-Jacksonian Elected to finish Huntington's term.
Lost re-election.
24th March 4, 1835 –
December 10, 1835
Isaac Toucey - Brady-Handy.jpg
Isaac Toucey
Jacksonian Elected in 1835.
Redistricted to the 1st district .
Samuel Ingham Jacksonian Elected in 1835.
Redistricted to the 2nd district .
Elisha Haley.jpg
Elisha Haley
Jacksonian Elected in 1835.
Redistricted to the 3rd district .
Zalmon Wildman Jacksonian Elected in 1835.
Died.
Lancelot Phelps Jacksonian Elected in 1835.
Redistricted to the 5th district .
Andrew T. Judson Jacksonian Elected in 1835.
Resigned to become U.S. District Judge.
December 10, 1835 –
April 29, 1836
Vacant
April 29, 1836 –
July 4, 1836
Thomas T. Whittlesey Jacksonian Elected to finish Wildman's term.
Redistricted to the 4th district .
July 4, 1836 –
December 5, 1836
Vacant
December 5, 1836 –
March 3, 1837
Orrin Holt Jacksonian Elected to finish Judson's term.
Redistricted to the 6th district .

In 1837, Connecticut abandoned general tickets and adopted districts instead.

1903–1913: one seat

In 1903, one at-large seat was created, four district seats continued.

MemberPartyYearsCong
ress(es)
Electoral history
GeorgeLLilley.jpg
George L. Lilley
Republican March 4, 1903 –
January 5, 1909
58th
59th
60th
Elected in 1902.
Re-elected in 1904.
Re-elected in 1906.
Resigned when elected Governor of Connecticut.
VacantJanuary 5, 1909 –
March 3, 1909
John Q Tilson.jpg
John Q. Tilson
Republican March 4, 1909 –
March 3, 1913
61st
62nd
Elected in 1908.
Re-elected in 1910.
Redistricted to the 3rd district and lost re-election.
At-large seat eliminated

1933–1965: one seat

In 1933, one at-large seat was created, five district seats continued.

RepresentativePartyYearsCong
ress(es)
Electoral history
Charles Montague Bakewell Republican March 4, 1933 –
January 3, 1935
73rd Elected in 1932.
Lost re-election.
WilliamMCitron.jpg
William M. Citron
Democratic January 3, 1935 –
January 3, 1939
74th
75th
Elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Lost re-election.
BJMonkiewicz.jpg
B. J. Monkiewicz
Republican January 3, 1939 –
January 3, 1941
76th Elected in 1938.
Lost re-election.
Lucien J. Maciora Democratic January 3, 1941 –
January 3, 1943
77th Elected in 1940.
Lost re-election.
BJMonkiewicz.jpg
B. J. Monkiewicz
Republican January 3, 1943 –
January 3, 1945
78th Elected in 1942.
Lost re-election.
JosephFRyter.jpg
Joseph F. Ryter
Democratic January 3, 1945 –
January 3, 1947
79th Elected in 1944.
Lost re-election.
Antoni Sadlak (Connecticut Congressman).jpg
Antoni Sadlak
Republican January 3, 1947 –
January 3, 1959
80th
81st
82nd
83rd
84th
85th
Elected in 1946.
Re-elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
Re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Lost re-election.
Frank Kowalski (Connecticut Congressman).jpg
Frank Kowalski
Democratic January 3, 1959 –
January 3, 1963
86th
87th
Elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Retired to run for U.S. senator.
Bernard F. Grabowski.jpg
Bernard F. Grabowski
Democratic January 3, 1963 –
January 3, 1965
88th Elected in 1962.
Redistricted to the 6th district .
At-large district eliminated

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References

  1. "Connecticut 1790 U.S. House of Representatives". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University . Retrieved February 4, 2018., citing The Connecticut Gazette (New London, CT). October 22, 1790.