Constitutional Court of Colombia

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Constitutional Court of Colombia
PalacioDeJusticia2004-7-9Bogota.jpg
Palace of Justice
Established1991
Location Bogotá
Coordinates 04°35′56.4″N74°04′31.8″W / 4.599000°N 74.075500°W / 4.599000; -74.075500
Composition methodNominated by the President, the Council of State, or the Supreme Court, elected by the Senate.
Authorized by Constitution of Colombia
Judge term lengthnon-renewable 8 years
Number of positions9, by statute
Website www.corteconstitucional.gov.co
President of the Constitutional Court
CurrentlyGloria Stella Ortiz Delgado
Since11 February 2019
Vice President of the Constitutional Court
CurrentlyAlberto Rojas Rios
Since11 February 2019

The Constitutional Court of Colombia (Spanish : Corte Constitucional de Colombia) is the supreme constitutional court of Colombia. Part of the Judiciary, it is the final appellate court for matters involving interpretation of the Constitution with the power to determine the constitutionality of laws, acts, and statutes.

Contents

The court was first established by the Constitution of 1991, and its first session began in March 1992. The court is housed within the shared judicial complex of the Palace of Justice located on the north side of Bolívar Square in the La Candelaria neighbourhood of Bogotá.

The Constitutional Court consists of nine magistrates who are elected by the Senate of Colombia from ternary lists drawn up by the President, the Supreme Court of Justice, and the Council of State. The magistrates serve for a term of eight years. The court is headed by a President and Vice President.

Composition

Current magistrates

Further reading

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