Demetrius (biblical figure)

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The name Demetrius occurs in two places in the Bible, both in the New Testament:

Bible Collection of religious texts in Judaism and Christianity

The Bible is a collection of sacred texts or scriptures. Varying parts of the Bible are considered to be a product of divine inspiration and a record of the relationship between God and humans by Christians, Jews, Samaritans, and Rastafarians.

New Testament Second division of the Christian biblical canon

The New Testament is the second part of the Christian biblical canon, the first part being the Old Testament, based on the Hebrew Bible. The New Testament discusses the teachings and person of Jesus, as well as events in first-century Christianity. Christians regard both the Old and New Testaments together as sacred scripture. The New Testament has frequently accompanied the spread of Christianity around the world. It reflects and serves as a source for Christian theology and morality. Extended readings and phrases directly from the New Testament are incorporated into the various Christian liturgies. The New Testament has influenced religious, philosophical, and political movements in Christendom and left an indelible mark on literature, art, and music.

Diana (mythology) goddess of the hunt, the moon and birthing, equated with the Greek goddess Artemis

Diana is a Roman goddess of the hunt, the Moon, and nature, associated with wild animals and woodland. She is equated with the Greek goddess Artemis, and absorbed much of Artemis' mythology early in Roman history, including a birth on the island of Delos to parents Jupiter and Latona, and a twin brother, Apollo, though she had an independent origin in Italy.

Gaius is the Greek spelling for the male Roman name Caius, a figure in the New Testament of the Bible.

  1. A Christian, Gaius is mentioned in Macedonia as a traveling companion of Paul, along with Aristarchus.
  2. One chapter later, Gaius who has a residence in Derbe is named as one of Paul's seven traveling companions who waited for him at Troas.
  3. Gaius is mentioned as having a residence in Corinth as being one of only a few people there who were baptised by Paul, who founded the Church in that city.
  4. Gaius is referred to in a final greeting portion of the Epistle to the Romans as Paul's "host" and also host of the whole church, in whatever city Paul is writing from at the time. In all likelihood, this was Corinth.
  5. Lastly, Gaius of Ephesus to whom the third Epistle of John is addressed. He may be Gaius mentioned in any of the other contexts.
Gospel description of the life of Jesus, canonical or apocryphal

Gospel originally meant the Christian message itself, but in the 2nd century it came to be used for the books in which the message was set out. The four canonical gospels — Matthew, Mark, Luke and John — were probably written between AD 66 and 110, building on older sources and traditions, and each gospel has its own distinctive understanding of Jesus and his divine role. All four are anonymous, and it is almost certain that none were written by an eyewitness. They are the main source of information on the life of Jesus as searched for in the quest for the historical Jesus. Modern scholars are cautious of relying on them unquestioningly, but critical study attempts to distinguish the original ideas of Jesus from those of the later authors. Many non-canonical gospels were also written, all later than the four, and all, like them, advocating the particular theological views of their authors.

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Book of Amos book of the Bible

The Book of Amos is the third of the Twelve Minor Prophets in the Tanakh/Old Testament and the second in the Greek Septuagint tradition. Amos, an older contemporary of Hosea and Isaiah, was active c. 750 BC during the reign of Jeroboam II, making Amos the first book of the Bible to be written. Amos lived in the kingdom of Judah but preached in the northern kingdom of Israel. His major themes of social justice, God's omnipotence, and divine judgment became staples of prophecy.

Matthew the Apostle Christian evangelist and apostle

Matthew the Apostle was, according to the Christian Bible, one of the twelve apostles of Jesus and, according to Christian tradition, one of the four Evangelists.

Mary, mother of John Mark is mentioned in the Acts 12:12, which says that, after his escape from prison, Peter went to her house:

When he realized this, he went to the house of Mary, the mother of John whose other name was Mark, where many were gathered together and were praying.

Old Testament First part of Christian Bibles based on the Hebrew Bible

The Old Testament is the first part of Christian Bibles, based primarily upon the Hebrew Bible, a collection of ancient religious writings by the Israelites believed by most Christians and religious Jews to be the sacred Word of God. The second part of the Christian Bible is the New Testament.

Third Epistle of John book of the Bible

The Third Epistle of John, often referred to as Third John and written 3 John or III John, is the antepenultimate book of the New Testament and attributed to John the Evangelist, traditionally thought to be the author of the Gospel of John and the other two epistles of John. The Third Epistle of John is a private letter composed to a man named Gaius, recommending to him a group of Christians led by Demetrius, which had come to preach the gospel in the area where Gaius lived. The purpose of the letter is to encourage and strengthen Gaius, and to warn him against Diotrephes, who refuses to cooperate with the author of the letter.

Joses is a name, usually regarded as a form of Joseph, occurring many times in the New Testament:

John of Patmos Christian saint and author of the Book of Revelation

John of Patmos is the author named as John in the Book of Revelation, the apocalyptic text forming the final book of the New Testament. The text of Revelation states that John was on Patmos, a Greek island where, by most biblical historians, he is considered to be in exile as a result of anti-Christian persecution under the Roman emperor Domitian.

Bruce M. Metzger American scholar

Bruce Manning Metzger (1914–2007) was an American biblical scholar, Bible translator and textual critic who was a longtime professor at Princeton Theological Seminary and Bible editor who served on the board of the American Bible Society and United Bible Societies. He was a scholar of Greek, New Testament, and New Testament textual criticism, and wrote prolifically on these subjects. Metzger was one of the most influential New Testament scholars of the 20th century.

Sopater was the son of Pyrhus, a man from the city of Berea, mentioned in Acts 20:4. Sopater and others accompanied Paul out of Macedonia after a group of Jews began to plot against Paul, and then sailed from Philippi to Alexandria Troas where they met Paul who had gone by land.

According to the Bible, Blastus was the chamberlain of Herod Agrippa, a mediator for the Sidonians and Tyrians, and was believed to be involved in the events that led to Herod's death.

Manahen Teacher of the Church of Antioch

Manahen was a teacher in the first century Christian Church at Antioch who had been 'brought up' with Herod Antipas.

Two witnesses

In the Book of Revelation, the two witnesses are two of God's prophets who are seen in a vision by John of Patmos, who appear during the Second woe recorded in Revelation 11:1-14. They have been variously identified by theologians as two individuals, as two groups of people, or as two concepts. Dispensationalist Christians believe that the events described in the Book of Revelation will occur before and during the Second Coming of Christ. The two witnesses that I mentioned in the Bible are the old Testament and the new Testament

Celidonius

Celidonius is the traditional name ascribed to the man born blind whom Jesus healed in the Gospel of John 9:1-38. This tradition is attested in both Eastern Christianity and in Catholicism.

Lectionary 115, designated by siglum 115 is a Greek manuscript of the New Testament, on parchment leaves. Palaeographically it has been assigned to the 10th century.

Demetrius the Chronographer was a Jewish chronicler (historian) of the late 3rd century BCE, who lived probably in Alexandria and wrote in Greek.

Mark the cousin of Barnabas is a character mentioned in the New Testament, usually identified with John Mark. The opinion that this Mark is a different Mark is found in the writings of Hippolytus of Rome who thought them to be separate people.

Zebedee father of James and John, two disciples of Jesus

Zebedee, according to all four Canonical Gospels, was the father of James and John, two disciples of Jesus. The gospels also suggest that he was the husband of Salome: whereas Mark 15:40 names the women present at the crucifixion as "Mary Magdalene, and Mary the mother of James the Less and of Joses, and Salome", the parallel passage in Matthew 27:56 has "Mary Magdalene, and Mary the mother of James and Joses, and the mother of Zebedee's children." The Catholic Encyclopedia concludes that the Salome of Mark 15:40 is probably identical with the mother of the sons of Zebedee in Matthew.

References

  1. "Acts, Chapter 19 - King James Bible". bible.somd.com.