Departments of Cameroon

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Departments of Cameroon CM-Departements par region.png
Departments of Cameroon

The Regions of Cameroon are divided into 58 divisions or departments. The divisions are further sub-divided into sub-divisions ( arrondissements ) and districts. The divisions are listed below, by province.

Contents

Cameroon is divided into 10 regions. Provinces of Cameroon EN.svg
Cameroon is divided into 10 regions.

The constitution divides Cameroon into 10 semi-autonomous regions, each under the administration of an elected Regional Council. A presidential decree of 12 November 2008 officially instigated the change from provinces to regions. [1] Each region is headed by a presidentially appointed governor. These leaders are charged with implementing the will of the president, reporting on the general mood and conditions of the regions, administering the civil service, keeping the peace, and overseeing the heads of the smaller administrative units. Governors have broad powers: they may order propaganda in their area and call in the army, gendarmes, and police. [2] All local government officials are employees of the central government's Ministry of Territorial Administration, from which local governments also get most of their budgets. [3]

The regions are subdivided into 58 divisions (departments). These are headed by presidentially appointed divisional officers ( préfets ), who perform the governors' duties on a smaller scale. The divisions are further sub-divided into sub-divisions (arrondissements), headed by assistant divisional officers (sous-prefets). The districts, administered by district heads (chefs de district), are the smallest administrative units. These are found in large sub-divisions and in regions that are difficult to reach.

The three northernmost regions are the Far North (Extrême Nord), North (Nord), and Adamawa (Adamaoua). Directly south of them are the Centre (Centre) and East (Est). The South Province (Sud) lies on the Gulf of Guinea and the southern border. Cameroon's western region is split into four smaller regions: The Littoral (Littoral) and Southwest (Sud-Ouest) regions are on the coast, and the Northwest (Nord-Ouest) and West (Ouest) regions are in the western grassfields. The Northwest and Southwest were once part of British Cameroons; the other regions were in French Cameroun.

See summary of administrative history in Zeitlyn 2018. [4]

North Cameroon Macro-Region

Adamawa (Adamaoua)

Divisions of Adamawa province Adamawa divisions.png
Divisions of Adamawa province

The Adamawa province of Cameroon contains the following five departments:

  1. Djérem
  2. Faro-et-Déo
  3. Mayo-Banyo
  4. Mbéré
  5. Vina

Far North (Extrême-Nord)

Divisions of Far North province Far North Cameroon divisions.png
Divisions of Far North province

The Far North province of Cameroon contains the following six departments:

  1. Diamaré
  2. Logone-et-Chari
  3. Mayo-Danay
  4. Mayo-Kani
  5. Mayo-Sava
  6. Mayo-Tsanaga

North (Nord)

Divisions of North province North Cameroon divisions.png
Divisions of North province

The North province of Cameroon contains the following four departments:

  1. Bénoué
  2. Faro
  3. Mayo-Louti
  4. Mayo-Rey

South Cameroon Macro-Region

Centre

Divisions of Centre province Centre divisions.png
Divisions of Centre province

The Centre province of Cameroon contains the following ten departments:

  1. Haute-Sanaga
  2. Lekié
  3. Mbam-et-Inoubou
  4. Mbam-et-Kim
  5. Méfou-et-Afamba
  6. Méfou-et-Akono
  7. Mfoundi
  8. Nyong-et-Kéllé
  9. Nyong-et-Mfoumou
  10. Nyong-et-So'o

East (Est)

Divisions of East province East Cameroon divisions.png
Divisions of East province

The East province of Cameroon contains the following four departments:

  1. Boumba-et-Ngoko
  2. Haut-Nyong
  3. Kadey
  4. Lom-et-Djerem

South (Sud)

Divisions of South province South Cameroon divisions.png
Divisions of South province

The South province of Cameroon contains the following four departments:

  1. Dja-et-Lobo
  2. Mvila
  3. Océan
  4. Vallée-du-Ntem

West Cameroon Macro-Region

Littoral

Divisions of Littoral province Littoral Cameroon divisions.png
Divisions of Littoral province

The Littoral province of Cameroon contains the following four departments:

  1. Moungo
  2. Nkam
  3. Sanaga-Maritime
  4. Wouri

Northwest (Nord-Ouest)

Divisions of Northwest province Northwest Cameroon divisions.png
Divisions of Northwest province

The Northwest province of Cameroon contains the following seven departments:

  1. Boyo
  2. Bui
  3. Donga-Mantung
  4. Menchum
  5. Mezam
  6. Momo
  7. Ngo-ketunjia

Southwest (Sud-Ouest)

Divisions of Southwest province Southwest Cameroon divisions.png
Divisions of Southwest province

The Southwest province of Cameroon contains the following six departments:

  1. Fako
  2. Koupé-Manengouba
  3. Lebialem
  4. Manyu
  5. Meme
  6. Ndian

West (Ouest)

Divisions of West province West Cameroon divisions.png
Divisions of West province

The West province of Cameroon contains the following eight departments:

  1. Bamboutos
  2. Haut-Nkam
  3. Hauts-Plateaux
  4. Koung-Khi
  5. Menoua
  6. Mifi
  7. Ndé
  8. Noun

See also

Related Research Articles

Regions of Cameroon

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Northwest Region (Cameroon) region of Cameroon

The Northwest Region, or North-West Region of Cameroon is part of the territory of the Southern Cameroons, found in the western highlands of Cameroon. It is bordered to the southwest by the Southwest Region, to the south by the West Region, to the east by the Adamawa Region, and to the north by the Federal Republic of Nigeria. Bamenda is the capital of the region. Various Ambazonian nationalist and separatist factions regard the Nord-Ouest region as being distinct as a polity from Cameroon.

Departments of Ivory Coast

Departments of Ivory Coast are currently the third-level administrative subdivision of the country. Each of the 31 second-level regions of Ivory Coast is divided into two or more departments. Each department is divided into two or more sub-prefectures, which are the fourth-level subdivisions in Ivory Coast. As of 2016, there are 108 departments of Ivory Coast.

East Region (Cameroon) region of Cameroon

The East Region occupies the southeastern portion of the Republic of Cameroon. It is bordered to the east by the Central African Republic, to the south by Congo, to the north by the Adamawa Region, and to the west by the Centre and South Regions. With 109,002 km² of territory, it is the largest region in the nation as well as the most sparsely populated. Historically, the peoples of the East have been settled in Cameroonian territory for longer than any other of the country's many ethnic groups, the first inhabitants being the Baka pygmies.

Centre Region (Cameroon) region of Cameroon

The Centre Region occupies 69,000 km² of the central plains of the Republic of Cameroon. It is bordered to the north by the Adamawa Region, to the south by the South Region, to the east by the East Region, and to the West by the Littoral and West Regions. It is the second largest of Cameroon's regions in land area. Major ethnic groups include the Bassa, Ewondo, and Vute.

Adamawa Region region of Cameroon

The Adamawa Region is a constituent region of the Republic of Cameroon. It borders the Centre and East regions to the south, the Northwest and West regions to the southwest, Nigeria to the west, the Central African Republic (CAR) to the east, and the North Region to the north.

West Region (Cameroon) region of Cameroon

The West Region is 14,000 km² of territory located in the central-western portion of the Republic of Cameroon. It borders the Northwest Region to the northwest, the Adamawa Region to the northeast, the Centre Region to the southeast, the Littoral Region to the southwest, and the Southwest Region to the west. The West Region is the smallest of Cameroon's ten regions in area, yet it has the highest population density.

Southern Bantoid languages Branch of the Bantuid family of Niger–Congo languages

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North Region (Cameroon) region of Cameroon


The North Region makes up 66,090 km² of the northern half of The Republic of Cameroon. Neighbouring territories include the Far North Region to the north, the Adamawa Region to the south, Nigeria to the west, Chad to the east, and Central African Republic to the southeast. The city of Garoua is both the political and industrial capital. Garoua is Cameroon's third largest port, despite the fact that the Bénoué River upon which it relies is only navigable for short periods of the year.

Mbalmayo Place in Centre Province, Cameroon

Mbalmayo is a city in Cameroon's Centre Province. The town had 60,091 inhabitants in 2012. It is the capital of the Nyong-et-So'o Department. It is located at the banks of the Nyong river between Ebolowa and Yaoundé. It is an agricultural centre and has an important function as a centre of education. Site of the Mbalmayo National Forestry School.

Littoral Region (Cameroon) region of Cameroon

The Littoral Region is a region of Cameroon. Its capital is Douala. As of 2004, its population was 3,174,437. Its name is due to the region being largely littoral, and associated with the sea coast.

Southwest Region (Cameroon) region of Cameroon

The Southwest Region or South-West Region is a region in Cameroon. Its capital is Buea. As of 2015, its population was 1,553,320. Along with the Northwest Region, it is one of the two anglophone (English-speaking) regions of Cameroon. Various Ambazonian nationalist and separatist factions regard the Sud-Ouest region as being distinct as a polity from Cameroon.

Subdivisions of Cameroon

The constitution divides Cameroon into 10 semi-autonomous regions, each under the administration of an elected Regional Council. A presidential decree of 12 November 2008 officially instigated the change from provinces to regions. Each region is headed by a presidentially appointed governor. These leaders are charged with implementing the will of the president, reporting on the general mood and conditions of the regions, administering the civil service, keeping the peace, and overseeing the heads of the smaller administrative units. Governors have broad powers: they may order propaganda in their area and call in the army, gendarmes, and police. All local government officials are employees of the central government's Ministry of Territorial Administration, from which local governments also get most of their budgets.

Djérem Department in Adamawa Province, Cameroon

Djérem is a department of Adamawa Province in Cameroon. The department covers an area of 13,283 km2 and as of 2001 had a total population of 89,382.The capital of the department lies at Tibati.

Government of Cameroon

The Republic of Cameroon is a decentralized unitary state. Cameroon is ruled by a dictatorship.

The Mbam Djerem National Park is found in Cameroon. It was established in 2000 and covers 4234.78 km².

Daloa Department Department in Sassandra-Marahoué, Ivory Coast

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Njomgang Isaac was a Cameroonian politician and administrator. He was the First black local Cameroonian Administrator appointed in Dschang Post Colonial Administration. He was born in 1931 at Tsep, Batoufam, West Region, Cameroon, and died in 2008.

References

  1. Décret N° 2008/376 du 12 novembre 2008, President of the Republic website. Accessed 9 June 2009.
  2. Neba 250.
  3. United States Department of State
  4. Zeitlyn, David (2018-08-03). "A summary of Cameroonian Administrative history". Vestiges: Traces of Record. 4 (1): 1–13.