List of Eastern Orthodox saint titles

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The holy figures of the Eastern Orthodox Church (and of the Eastern Catholic Churches of the Byzantine Rite) have various customary saint titles with which they are commemorated on the liturgical calendar and in Divine Services.

Eastern Orthodox Church Christian Church

The Eastern Orthodox Church, officially the Orthodox Catholic Church, is the second-largest Christian church, with approximately 200–260 million members. It operates as a communion of autocephalous churches, each governed by its bishops in local synods, although roughly half of Eastern Orthodox Christians live in Russia. The church has no central doctrinal or governmental authority analogous to the Bishop of Rome, but the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople is recognised by all as primus inter pares of the bishops. As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, the Eastern Orthodox Church has played a prominent role in the history and culture of Eastern and Southeastern Europe, the Caucasus, and the Near East.

Eastern Catholic Churches autonomous, self-governing particular Churches in full communion with the Pope

The Eastern Catholic Churches or Oriental Catholic Churches, also called the Eastern-rite Catholic Churches, and in some historical cases Uniate Churches, are twenty-three Eastern Christian particular churches sui iuris in full communion with the Pope in Rome, as part of the worldwide Catholic Church. Headed by patriarchs, metropolitans, and major archbishops, the Eastern Catholic Churches are governed in accordance with the Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches, although each church also has its own canons and laws on top of this, and the preservation of their own traditions is explicitly encouraged. The total membership of the various churches accounts for about 18 million, according to the Annuario Pontificio, thus making up about 1.5 percent of the Catholic Church, with the rest of its more than 1.2 billion members belonging to the Latin Church, also known as the Western Church or the Roman Catholic Church.

Byzantine Rite Whole of the worship life of the Eastern Catholic Churches

The Byzantine Rite, also known as the Greek Rite or Constantinopolitan Rite, is the liturgical rite used by the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Greek/Byzantine Catholic churches, and in a modified form, Byzantine Rite Lutheranism. Its development began during the fourth century in Constantinople and it is now the second most-used ecclesiastical rite in Christendom after the Roman Rite.

Contents

The following list explains the references:

The title Confessor, the short form of Confessor of the Faith, is a title given by the Christian Church to a type of saint.

Hieromartyr Clergyman who dies as a martyr

In the Eastern Orthodox tradition, a hieromartyr is a martyr who was a bishop or priest. Analogously, a monk who is a priest is known as a hieromonk.

Clergy leaders within certain religions

Clergy are some of the main and important formal leaders within certain religions. The roles and functions of clergy vary in different religious traditions but these usually involve presiding over specific rituals and teaching their religion's doctrines and practices. Some of the terms used for individual clergy are clergyman, clergywoman and churchman. Less common terms are churchwoman, clergyperson and cleric.

See also

The Encyclopedia of Orthodox Saints is a new undertaking to list and categorize every Christian Saint recognised as such by the Eastern Orthodox Church. The current development has led to the establishment of a wiki-styled website which can be accessed by its members and others who wish to add to this new initiative. Founded in June 2007, it seeks to list the names of over 23,000 known Christian Orthodox Saints. The Orthodox Church recognizes millions of Christian Saints, the vast majority of whose names are known only to God.

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Canonization Act by which churches declare that a person who has died was a saint

Canonization is the act by which a Christian church declares that a person who has died was a saint, upon which declaration the person is included in the "canon", or list, of recognized saints. Originally, a person was recognized as a saint without any formal process. Later, different processes were developed, such as those used today in the Roman Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, Oriental Orthodox Church and the Anglican Communion.

Saint one who has been recognized for having an exceptional degree of holiness, sanctity, and virtue

A saint is a person who is recognized as having an exceptional degree of holiness or likeness or closeness to God. However, the use of the term "saint" depends on the context and denomination. In Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Anglican, Oriental Orthodox, and Lutheran doctrine, all of their faithful deceased in Heaven are considered to be saints, but some are considered worthy of greater honor or emulation; official ecclesiastical recognition, and consequently veneration, is given to some saints through the process of canonization in the Catholic Church or glorification in the Eastern Orthodox Church.

The Venerable title used in the Catholic church

The Venerable is used as a style or epithet in several Christian churches. It is also the common English-language translation of a number of Buddhist titles, and is used as a word of praise in some cases.

September 24 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics) day in the Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar

September 23 - Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar - September 25

September 28 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics) day in the Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar

September 27 - Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar - September 29

May 30 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics) day in the Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar

May 29 - Eastern Orthodox Church calendar - May 31

June 2 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics) day in the Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar

June 1 - Eastern Orthodox Church calendar - June 3

August 3 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics) day in the Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar

August 2 - Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar - August 4

January 25 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics) day in the Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar

January 24 - Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar - January 26

February 16 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics) day in the Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar

February 15 - Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar - February 17

February 19 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics) day in the Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar

February 18 - Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar - February 20

February 28 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics) day in the Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar

February 27 - Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar - March 1.

February 29 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics) day in the Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar

February 28 - Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar - March 1
(On non-leap years, the commemorations below are celebrated on February 28.)

Coptic history

Coptic history is part of history of Egypt that begins with the introduction of Christianity in Egypt in the 1st century AD during the Roman period, and covers the history of the Copts to the present day. Many of the historic items related to Coptic Christianity are on display in many museums around the world and a large number is in the Coptic Museum in Coptic Cairo.

December 5 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics) day in the Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar

December 4 - Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar - December 6

December 10 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics) day in the Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar

December 9 - Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar - December 11

December 27 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics) day in the Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar

December 26 - Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar - December 28

March 16 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics) day in the Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar

March 15 - Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar - March 17

New Martyrs and Confessors of the Russian Orthodox Church

New Martyrs and Confessors of Russian Church is group of saints of Russian orthodox church martyred or persecuted for Christ after the October Revolution of 1917.

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