List of submarine classes of the United States Navy

Last updated

Submarines of the United States Navy are built in classes, using a single design for a number of boats. Minor variations occur as improvements are incorporated into the design, so later boats of a class may be more capable than earlier. Also, boats are modified, sometimes extensively, while in service, creating departures from the class standard. However, in general, all boats of a class are noticeably similar.

Contents

Experimental use: an example is USS Albacore (AGSS-569), which used an unprecedented hull design. In this list such single boat "classes" are marked with "(unique)".

Pre–World War I

Pre–World War I
Class nameNo.Laid downLast comm.Notes
Alligator [1] 118611862First submarine in the U.S. Navy. Purpose was to protect wooden ships against ironclads.
Holland [2] [3] 1189619005 others were made; only Holland (SS-1) entered the U.S. Navy as it was the first officially commissioned submarine purchased on 11 April 1900.
Plunger [4] [5] [6] [7] 719001903Later renamed A class in November 1911, when Navy stopped naming submarines. Essentially enlarged, more powerful Holland.
B [8] [9] [10] [11] 319051907Last in series of Holland-like submarines. Originally known as Viper class.
C [12] 519051910Designed by Lawrence York Spear. Originally known as the Octopus class.
D [13] 319081910Originally known as the Narwhal class. Designed to survive flooding in one compartment.
E [14] 219091912First US Navy diesel-powered submarine. Known as "pig boats", or "boats", due to foul living quarters and unusual hull shape.
F [15] 419091913In 1920, the class was designated SS-20SS-23.
G [16] [17] [18] [19] 419091914Used gasoline engine. G-1 (SS-19½) set the submerged depth record in 1915, 256 feet (78 m). G-1 (SS-19½) was given the number 19½ because SS- numbers were given after her decommissioning; she was between SS-19 & SS-20.
H [20] [21] 9191119183 originally ordered by U.S. Navy. 17 ordered by the Imperial Russian Navy, 11 delivered. Other 6 bought by U.S. Navy. Known as "pig boats", or "boats", due to foul living quarters and unusual hull shape.
K [22] [23] 819121912Known as "pig boats", or "boats", due to foul living quarters and unusual hull shape. K-1 (SS-32), K-2 (SS-33), K-5 (SS-36), K-6 (SS-37) were the first U.S. submarines to see action in World War I.
L [24] 1119141918The first US submarines with a deck gun. Known as "pig boats", or "boats", due to foul living quarters and unusual hull shape. Designed for coastal defense.
M-1 [25] 119141918Double-hull design. Twenty percent larger than the K class. Known as "pig boats", or "boats", due to foul living quarters and unusual hull shape. Considered failure by the submarine community.
N [26] 719151918Known as "pig boats", or "boats", due to foul living quarters and unusual hull shape. Used for coastal patrol.
O [27] [28] 1619161918Each cost $550,000. First submarines with reliable diesel engines. Every man had his own berth and locker. Known as "pig boats", or "boats", due to foul living quarters and unusual hull shape. O-11 through O-16 (built by Lake Torpedo Boat Company) also known as the "modified O-class". Modified boats proved to be disappointing and were scrapped in 1930; Lake went out of business in 1925.
AA-1 [29] 319161922Later renamed T class. Designed for 5,540 miles (8,920 km) at 14 knots (7.2 m/s), but performed 3,000 miles (4,800 km) at 11 knots (5.7 m/s). Prototype "fleet submarines"submarines fast enough (21 knots (11 m/s)) to travel with battleships. Twice the size of any concurrent or past U.S. submarine. A poor tandem engine design caused the boats to be decommissioned by 1923 and scrapped in 1930.

World War I

World War I
Class nameNo.Laid downLast comm.Notes
R [30] [31] 2019171918Larger conning tower to serve as commanding officer's battle station. Fired Mark 10 torpedoes and traveled 5,000 miles (8,000 km) at 10 knots (5.1 m/s).
R-21 [32] 719171919Designed by Simon Lake. Generally similar to R class, but smaller and reverted to 18-inch torpedo tubes. Scrapped in 1930; Lake went out of business in 1925.
S 5119171922The S class is subdivided into four groups of different designs.

Interwar

Interwar
Class nameNo.First ship laid downLast ship commissionedNotes
Barracuda 3 USS Barracuda (SS-163) and
USS Bass (SS-164)
20 October 1921
USS Bonita (SS-165)
22 May 1926
Argonaut 11 May 19252 April 1928Unique submarine; mine-laying submarine
Narwhal 2 USS Narwhal (SS-167)
10 May 1927
USS Nautilus (SS-168)
1 July 1930
Dolphin 114 June 19301 June 1932Unique submarine
Cachalot 2 USS Cachalot (SS-170)
7 October 1931
USS Cuttlefish (SS-171)
8 June 1934
Porpoise 10 USS Porpoise (SS-172)
24 October 1933
USS Pompano (SS-181)
12 June 1937
Salmon 6 USS Salmon (SS-182)
15 April 1936
USS Skipjack (SS-184)
30 June 1938
Sargo 10 USS Sargo (SS-188)
12 May 1937
USS Seawolf (SS-197)
1 December 1939
Tambor 12 USS Tambor (SS-198)
16 January 1939
USS Grayback (SS-208)
30 June 1941
Mackerel 2 USS Mackerel (SS-204)
6 October 1939
USS Marlin (SS-205)
1 August 1941
Gato 77 USS Drum (SS-228)
11 September 1940
USS Croaker (SS-246)
21 April 1944
USS Drum was only boat actually commissioned before US Entry to WWII

World War II

World War II
Class nameNo.First ship laid downLast ship commissionedNotes
Balao 120 USS Devilfish (SS-292)
31 March 1942
USS Tiru (SS-416)
1 September 1948
62 cancelled
Tench 29 USS Amberjack (SS-522), USS Grampus (SS-523), USS Pickerel (SS-524), and USS Grenadier (SS-525)
8 February 1944
USS Grenadier (SS-525)
10 February 1951
51 cancelled

Cold War

Diesel-Electric Submarines (SSs, SSKs, and SSGs)

Class NameNo.First boat laid downLast boat commissionedNotesSilhouette/Image
Barracuda 3 USS Barracuda (SSK-1)
1 July 1949
USS Bonita (SSK-3)
11 January 1952
USS Bass (SSK-2).jpg
Tang 6 USS Tang (SS-563)
18 April 1949
USS Gudgeon (SS-567)
21 November 1952
Gudgeon (SS-567) - Tang class.jpg
Grayback 2 USS Grayback (SSG-574)
1 July 1954
USS Growler (SSG-577)
30 August 1958
Regulus missile submarines USS Growler (SSG-577) (30721200025).jpg
Darter 110 November 195420 October 1956Unique submarine USS Darter (SS-576).jpg
Barbel 3 USS Barbel (SS-580)
18 May 1956
USS Blueback (SS-581)
15 October 1959
First production submarines with teardrop hull.
U.S. Navy's last conventionally-powered submarines
USS Barbel;0858005.jpg

Nuclear Attack Submarines (SSNs)

Class NameNo.First boat laid downLast boat commissionedNotesSilhouette/Image
Nautilus 114 June 195230 September 1954First nuclear submarine; hull design enlarged from fleet boat USS Nautilus SSN-571 -underway.jpg
Seawolf 17 December 195330 March 1957Unique submarine; liquid metal cooled (sodium) S2G reactor (replaced with a pressurized-water reactor in 1959) SSN575.svg
Skate 4 USS Skate (SSN-578)
21 July 1955
USS Seadragon (SSN-584)
5 December 1959
SSN578.svg
Skipjack 6 USS Skipjack (SSN-585)
29 May 1956
USS Snook (SSN-592)
24 October 1961
First nuclear submarine class with teardrop hull form. USS Scorpion lost at sea 1968. SSN585.svg
Thresher/Permit 14 USS Thresher (SSN-593)
28 May 1958
USS Gato (SSN-615)
25 January 1968
First class with bow sonar sphere. Known as Thresher class until the loss of the USS Thresher (SSN-593) in 1963 USS Thresher (SSN-593).jpg
Tullibee 126 May 19589 November 1960Unique submarine; turbo-electric transmission SSN597.svg
Sturgeon 37 USS Sturgeon (SSN-637)
10 August 1963
USS Richard B. Russell (SSN-687)
16 August 1975
Redesign of Thresher/Permit class using lessons learned from loss of Thresher. SSN637.svg
Narwhal 117 January 196612 July 1969Unique submarine; natural circulation S5G reactor SSN671.svg
Glenard P. Lipscomb 15 June 197121 December 1974Unique submarine; turbo-electric transmission USS Glenard P. Lipscomb (SSN-685).jpg
Los Angeles 62 USS Los Angeles (SSN-688)
8 January 1972
USS Cheyenne (SSN-773)
13 September 1996
SSN688.svg
Seawolf 3 USS Seawolf (SSN-21)
25 October 1989
USS Jimmy Carter (SSN-23)
19 February 2005
Planned successor of Los Angeles class. High costs caused only three to be built. USS Seawolf (SSN-21) (21274044216).jpg

Nuclear Cruise Missile Submarines (SSGNs)

Note: Several boats were converted into cruise missile submarines after construction, the USS Halibut was the only purpose built SSGN of the US Navy
Class NameNo.First boat laid downLast boat commissionedNotesPicture/Silhouette
Halibut 111 April 19574 January 1960Unique submarine; Regulus missile submarine USS Halibut SSGN-587.jpg

Nuclear Ballistic Missile Submarines (SSBNs)

Class NameNo.First boat laid downLast boat commissionedNotesPicture/Silhouette
George Washington 5 USS George Washington (SSBN-598)
1 November 1957
USS Abraham Lincoln (SSBN-602)
11 March 1961
SSBN598.svg
Ethan Allen 5 USS Ethan Allen (SSBN-608)
14 September 1959
USS Thomas Jefferson (SSBN-618)
4 January 1963
Ethan Allen was the only SSBN to fire live missile and detonate nuclear warhead at test range proving theory. USS Ethan Allen (SSBN-608).jpg
Lafayette 9 USS Lafayette (SSBN-616)
17 January 1961
USS John Adams (SSBN-620)
12 May 1964
USS Lafayette SSBN-616.jpg
James Madison 10 USS Daniel Boone (SSBN-629)
6 February 1962
USS Nathanael Greene (SSBN-636)
19 December 1964
USS Daniel Boone SSBN-629.jpg
Benjamin Franklin 12 USS Benjamin Franklin (SSBN-640)
25 May 1963
USS Will Rogers (SSBN-659)
1 April 1967
Redesigned using lessons learned from loss of Thresher. USS Benjamin Franklin (SSBN-640).gif
Ohio 18 USS Ohio (SSBN-726)
10 April 1976
USS Louisiana (SSBN-743)
6 September 1997
SSBN726 Ohio.svg

Deep-submergence vehicles (DSVs)

Class NameNo.First boat laid downLast boat commissionedNotesPicture/Silhouette
Trieste class 2 Trieste (DSV-0)
1958
Trieste II (DSV-1)
1969
The Trieste was the first submarine which reached the Challenger Deep by Swiss Jacques Piccard and US Navy Lieutenant Don Walsh in 1960. Bathyscaphe Trieste.jpg
Alvin class 4 Alvin (DSV-2)
5 June 1964
Nemo (DSV-5)
1970
ALVIN submersible.jpg
NR-1 110 June 196727 October 1969 NR-1 986.jpg

Miscellaneous Submarines (SSTs, SSRs, AGSSs & SSRNs)

Class NameNo.First boat laid downLast boat commissionedNotes
Albacore 115 March 19526 December 1953Unique submarine; teardrop hull form; no weapons
T-1 2USS T-1, later USS Mackerel (SST-1)
1 April 1952
USS T-2, later USS Marlin (SST-2)
20 November 1953
Training and experimental submarines
Sailfish 2 USS Sailfish (SSR-572)
8 December 1953
USS Salmon (SSR-573)
25 August 1956
Radar picket
Triton 129 May 195610 November 1959Unique submarine; Radar picket
Dolphin 19 November 196217 August 1968Unique submarine; research and development for deep diving technologies; last operational U.S. Navy diesel-electric submarine; Decommissioned 15 January 2007

Post–Cold War

Post–Cold War
Class nameNumber of boatsFirst boat laid downLast boat commissionedNotes
Virginia 48 (planned) USS Virginia (SSN-774)
2 September 1999
USS Vermont (SSN-792)
April 18, 2020
19 commissioned as of April 2020
Columbia 12 (planned) USS Columbia (SSBN-826)
(Planned)

See also

Related Research Articles

<i>Plunger</i>-class submarine 1903 class of submarines of the United States Navy

The Plunger class was an early class of United States Navy submarines, used primarily as training and experimental vessels for the newly formed "silent service" to familiarize naval personnel with the performance and operations of such craft. They were known as the "A class" after being renamed to A-type designations on 17 November 1911. All except Plunger ended up being stationed in the Philippines, an American possession, prior to the outbreak of World War I. They were shipped there on colliers. In some instances, this class of submarines is referred to as the Adder class, as USS Adder was the first boat of the class to be completed.

United States E-class submarine

The E-class submarines were a class of two United States Navy submarines, built by the Fore River Shipbuilding Company of Quincy, Massachusetts, under a subcontract from the Electric Boat Company. They were used as coastal and harbor defense submarines prior to World War I. When hostilities broke out, the E class were mostly used as training boats; however, E-1 operated on war patrols based in the Azores. During this time, the need for an improved permanent bridge structure was discovered; the temporary piping-and-canvas bridges were inadequate in the North Atlantic.

References

  1. "Alligator IV (Submarine)". Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. Naval History and Heritage Command. Retrieved 11 December 2016.
  2. "USS Holland (Submarine # 1) -- Construction". USN Ships. Department of the Navy. 10 June 2004. Retrieved 9 June 2009.
  3. "Holland I (SS-1)". Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. Naval History and Heritage Command. Retrieved 11 December 2016.
  4. "A-1 I (Submarine Torpedo Boat No. 2)". Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. Naval History and Heritage Command. 4 August 2015. Retrieved 11 December 2016.
  5. "A-2 (Submarine Torpedo Boat No. 3)". Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. Naval History and Heritage Command. 31 August 2016. Retrieved 11 December 2016.
  6. "A-5 (Submarine Torpedo Boat No. 6)". Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. Naval History and Heritage Command. 31 August 2016. Retrieved 11 December 2016.
  7. Friedman 1995, p. 28.
  8. "B class - Navy Ships". Military Factory. 3 August 2008. Retrieved 9 June 2009.
  9. "B-1". Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. Department of the Navy. Retrieved 9 June 2009.
  10. "B-3". Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. Department of the Navy. Retrieved 9 June 2009.
  11. John Pike. "SS-10 B-1 Viper".
  12. Pike, John (27 April 2005). "SS-9 C-1 Octopus". globalsecurity.org . Retrieved 9 June 2009.
  13. Pike, John (27 April 2005). "SS-17 D-1 Narwhal". globalsecurity.org . Retrieved 9 June 2009.
  14. Pike, John (27 April 2005). "SS-24 E-1 Skipjack". globalsecurity.org . Retrieved 10 June 2009.
  15. Pike, John (27 April 2005). "SS-20 F-1 Carp". globalsecurity.org . Retrieved 10 June 2009.
  16. Pike, John (27 April 2005). "SS-19(1/2) G-1 Seal". globalsecurity.org . Retrieved 10 June 2009.
  17. "G-1". Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. Department of the Navy. Retrieved 10 June 2009.
  18. "G-4". Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. Department of the Navy. Retrieved 10 June 2009.
  19. "California Naval History: The City of Los Angeles . . . An Inland City with the First Submarine Base on the Pacific Coast". militarymuseum.org. 2002. Retrieved 10 June 2009.
  20. Pike, John (27 April 2005). "SS-28 H-1 Seawolf". globalsecurity.org . Retrieved 10 June 2009.
  21. "H-9". Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. Department of the Navy. Retrieved 10 June 2009.
  22. Pike, John (27 April 2005). "SS-32 K-1 Haddock". globalsecurity.org . Retrieved 10 June 2009.
  23. "USS K-1 (Submarine # 32)". USN Ships. Department of the Navy. 17 June 2004. Retrieved 10 June 2009.
  24. Pike, John (27 April 2005). "SS-40 L-1". globalsecurity.org . Retrieved 11 June 2009.
  25. Pike, John (27 April 2005). "SS-47 M-1". globalsecurity.org . Retrieved 11 June 2009.
  26. Pike, John (27 April 2005). "SS-53 N-1". globalsecurity.org . Retrieved 11 June 2009.
  27. Pike, John (8 June 2005). "SS-62 O-1" . Retrieved 11 June 2009.
  28. Pike, John (27 April 2005). "SS-72 O-11". globalsecurity.org . Retrieved 11 June 2009.
  29. Pike, John (27 April 2005). "SS-52 T-1 Schley". globalsecurity.org . Retrieved 11 June 2009.
  30. Pike, John (27 April 2005). "SS-78 R-1". globalsecurity.org . Retrieved 11 June 2009.
  31. "R-20". Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. Department of the Navy. Retrieved 11 June 2009.
  32. Pike, John (27 April 2005). "SS-98 R-21". globalsecurity.org . Retrieved 11 June 2009.

General references

This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships .