Thornley-with-Wheatley

Last updated

Thornley-with-Wheatley
St William of York Ch - geograph.org.uk - 74706.jpg
Lee House chapel
Location map United Kingdom Borough of Ribble Valley.svg
Red pog.svg
Thornley-with-Wheatley
Location in Ribble Valley Borough
Location map United Kingdom Forest of Bowland.svg
Red pog.svg
Thornley-with-Wheatley
Location in the Forest of Bowland
Lancashire UK location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Thornley-with-Wheatley
Location within Lancashire
Population320 (2011 Census) [1]
Civil parish
  • Thornley-with-Wheatley
District
Shire county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town PRESTON
Postcode district PR3
Dialling code 01772
Police Lancashire
Fire Lancashire
Ambulance North West
EU Parliament North West England
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Lancashire
53°51′32″N2°33′50″W / 53.859°N 2.564°W / 53.859; -2.564 Coordinates: 53°51′32″N2°33′50″W / 53.859°N 2.564°W / 53.859; -2.564

Thornley-with-Wheatley is a civil parish in the Borough of Ribble Valley, Lancashire, England. It is entirely rural, with no villages or other substantial settlements. Its population was 320 in 2011, [1] a figure that has not changed much for over a century. [2]

Ribble Valley Borough in England

Ribble Valley is a local government district with borough status within the non-metropolitan county of Lancashire, England. The total population of the non-metropolitan district at the 2011 Census was 57,132. Its council is based in Clitheroe. Other places include Whalley, Longridge and Ribchester. The area is so called due to the River Ribble which flows in its final stages towards its estuary near Preston. The area is popular with tourists who enjoy the area's natural unspoilt beauty, much of which lies within the Forest of Bowland.

Lancashire County of England

Lancashire is a ceremonial county in North West England. The administrative centre is Preston. The county has a population of 1,449,300 and an area of 1,189 square miles (3,080 km2). People from Lancashire are known as Lancastrians.

Contents

The parish includes most of the western half of Longridge Fell, including the part known as Jeffrey Hill, and, apart from half a mile (1 km) at its western end, lies within the Forest of Bowland Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The River Loud forms its northwestern border. It includes Longridge Golf Club and the isolated Catholic chapel of St William at Lee House, a Grade II listed building, [3] whose parish closed in 1991 but is still occasionally used. [4]

Longridge Fell mountain in United Kingdom

Longridge Fell is the most southerly fell in England, near the town of Longridge, Lancashire. It lies at the southern end of the Forest of Bowland Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. As its name suggests, it takes the form of a long ridge which rises in a north-easterly direction from within the town of Longridge to its summit 4.5 miles distant. As the ridge curves towards the east, it comes to a sudden end and drops into the Hodder Valley. The fell is a good example of a cuesta; the ridge has a sharp drop or escarpment on its northern side, and a gentler, more varying slope on its southern side. These features make it a popular takeoff for hang-gliders and paragliders on the relatively infrequent occurrences of a northerly wind.

Forest of Bowland area in northeast Lancashire, England

The Forest of Bowland, also known as the Bowland Fells, is an area of barren gritstone fells, deep valleys and peat moorland, mostly in north-east Lancashire, England with a small part in North Yorkshire. It is a western spur of the Pennines and was once described as the "Switzerland of England".

Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty Designated area of countryside in England, Wales or Northern Ireland

An Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) is an area of countryside in England, Wales or Northern Ireland which has been designated for conservation due to its significant landscape value. Areas are designated in recognition of their national importance, by the relevant public body: Natural England, Natural Resources Wales, or the Northern Ireland Environment Agency. In place of AONB, Scotland uses the similar national scenic area (NSA) designation. Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty enjoy levels of protection from development similar to those of UK national parks, but unlike with national parks the responsible bodies do not have their own planning powers. They also differ from national parks in their more limited opportunities for extensive outdoor recreation.

Ann Cutler, the weaver and Methodist evangelist was born here in 1759. [5]

Ann Cutler was a British hand-loom weaver and Methodist evangelist.

See also

Related Research Articles

Kirkham, Lancashire town and civil parish in the Borough of Fylde in Lancashire, England

Kirkham is a small town and civil parish in the Borough of Fylde in Lancashire, England, midway between Blackpool and Preston and adjacent to the smaller town of Wesham. It owes its existence to Carr Hill upon which it was built and which was the location of a Roman fort. At the Census of 2011 it had a population 7,194.

Goosnargh village in the United Kingdom

Goosnargh is a village and civil parish in the City of Preston district of Lancashire, England. The village lies between Broughton and Longridge, and mostly lies in the civil parish of Whittingham, although the ancient centre lies in the civil parish of Goosnargh. The parish of Goosnargh had a population of 1,204 recorded in the 2001 census, increasing to 1,316 at the 2011 Census. The village population in 2011 was 1,072.

Chipping, Lancashire village and civil parish in Lancashire, UK

Chipping is a village and civil parish of the borough of Ribble Valley, Lancashire, England, within the Forest of Bowland Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. In the 2001 census, the parish had a population of 1,046, falling slightly to 1,043 at the 2011 Census. This Lancashire village has won a number of best kept village competitions over the years. The village also won the village section of the Royal Horticultural Society Britain in Bloom competition in 2009 picking up RHS Tourism and Gold achievement awards in the process.

Lowton village in United Kingdom

Lowton is a suburban village within the Metropolitan Borough of Wigan, in Greater Manchester, England. It is around 2 miles (3.2 km) from Leigh, 7 miles (11 km) south of Wigan and 11.0 miles (17.7 km) west of Manchester city centre. The settlement lies across the A580 East Lancashire Road.

Inglewhite village in England

Inglewhite is a small village in the parish of Goosnargh in Lancashire, England. It lies at the intersection of the roads from Longridge to Garstang and from Broughton to Beacon Fell.

Horspath village and civil parish in South Oxfordshire, England

Horspath is a village and civil parish in South Oxfordshire about 3.5 miles (5.6 km) east of the centre of Oxford, England. The 2011 Census recorded the parish's population as 1,378.

Gisburn village in the United Kingdom

Gisburn is a village and civil parish within the Ribble Valley borough of Lancashire, England. It lies 8 miles (13 km) northeast of Clitheroe and 11 miles (18 km) west of Skipton. The civil parish had a population of 506, recorded in the 2001 census, increasing to 521 at the 2011 Census.

Minshull Vernon village in the United Kingdom

Minshull Vernon is a hamlet and civil parish in the unitary authority of Cheshire East and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. The hamlet lies 3 miles (5 km) to the north west of Crewe, south east of Winsford and south west of Middlewich. The parish also includes the small settlements of Bradfield Green, Eardswick, Hoolgrave, Minshull Hill, Walley's Green and Weaver Bank. The total population of the civil parish is somewhat over 200, measured at 391 in the Census 2011. Nearby villages include Church Minshull, Warmingham and Wimboldsley.

Whitechapel, Lancashire human settlement in United Kingdom

Whitechapel is a tiny hamlet in the civil parish of Goosnargh in Lancashire, England. It lies on the border of the Forest of Bowland near the foot of Beacon Fell, and close to the neighbouring village of Inglewhite. Its name is marked as White Chapel on some maps.

Martha Thompson (1731–1820) was an English Methodist. She was a housemaid in London, and was converted to Methodism after hearing John Wesley preach in Moorfields. Thompson was declared insane and sent to Bedlam, but Wesley later freed her and rode with her back to her hometown of Preston. There she became a founder of Methodism in the region.

Wrightington civil parish in West Lancashire, England

Wrightington is a civil parish in West Lancashire, England, with an area of 3,915½ acres. The surface is hilly, rising to over 400 ft. at Harrock on the border of Parbold, and then falling to the north, northeast and southeast. On the southern border, the boundary at Appley Bridge touches the River Douglas. Wrightington Hall is to the north of this point. Tunley and Broadhurst lie to the north of the park, and Fairhurst, to the west of Harrock, reaches down to the River Douglas. At the 2001 census, Wrightington had a population of 4,055, falling to 2,886 at the 2011 Census.

St Wilfrids Church, Ribchester Church in Lancashire, England

St Wilfrid's Church is an Anglican church in the village of Ribchester in Lancashire, England that is situated close to the site of a Roman fort. It is an active parish church in the Diocese of Blackburn. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade I listed building.

Places of worship in Burnley List of places of worship

Burnley, in Lancashire, England, has a long history of religious worship, dating from at least before 1122 in the case of the Church of England. The chapel at Towneley Hall was the centre for Roman Catholic worship in Burnley until modern times. Well before the Industrial Revolution, the town saw the emergence of many non-conformist churches and chapels. In 1891 the town was the location of the meeting which saw the creation of the Baptist Union of Great Britain and Ireland. In the late 19th century a Jewish synagogue was established, and in recent times evangelical and free churches have appeared, as well as a large purpose-built mosque.

St John the Evangelists Church, Kirkham Church in Lancashire, England

St John the Evangelist's Church is in Ribby Road, Kirkham, Lancashire, England. It is an active Roman Catholic parish church in the diocese of Lancaster. The church was designed by A. W. N. Pugin, and is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building.

Church of St John the Divine, Holme Chapel Church in Lancashire, England

The Church of St John the Divine is in Burnley Road, Holme Chapel, a village in the civil parish of Cliviger, near Burnley, Lancashire, England. It is an active Anglican parish church in the diocese of Blackburn, and the church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building. It was built between 1788 and 1794, replacing a small chapel, and is in simple Classical style. Above the west front is a bell turret with an octagonal cupola, and inside the church are carved oak stalls, moved from a demolished church, which include a poppyhead and misericords.

Old Laund Booth is a civil parish in Pendle, Lancashire, England. It contains 17 listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. All of the listed buildings are designated at Grade II, the lowest of the three grades, which is applied to "buildings of national importance and special interest". The parish contains the villages of Fence and Wheatley, and surrounding countryside. Most of the listed buildings are houses and associated structures, farmhouses and farm buildings, the others being two churches, a school, and a public house.

St Pauls Church, Longridge Church in Lancashire, England

St Paul's Church stands off Berry Lane, Longridge, Lancashire, England. It is an active Anglican parish church in the diocese of Blackburn. The church was built in 1886–1888, and the tower was added in 1936–37. The church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building.

Thornley-with-Wheatley is a civil parish in Ribble Valley, Lancashire, England. It contains nine listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. All of the listed buildings are designated at Grade II, the lowest of the three grades, which is applied to "buildings of national importance and special interest". The parish is entirely rural, and most of the listed buildings are farmhouses and farm buildings. The other listed buildings are a house, a church and presbytery, and a mounting block.

References

  1. 1 2 UK Census (2011). "Local Area Report – Thornley-with-Wheatley Parish (1170215133)". Nomis. Office for National Statistics . Retrieved 2 February 2018.
  2. Thornley With Wheatley Tn/CP: Population, A vision of Britain through time, retrieved 17 February 2013
  3. Lee House. Church of St William of York and Adjoining Presbytery, Thornley-with-Wheatley, British Listed Buildings, retrieved 17 February 2013
  4. Closed churches & chapels, Diocese of Salford, retrieved 17 February 2013
  5. "Cutler, Ann (1759–1794), hand-loom weaver and Methodist evangelist | Oxford Dictionary of National Biography". www.oxforddnb.com. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/67658 . Retrieved 13 February 2019.