Trough of Bowland

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Sykes Farm, Trough of Bowland

The Trough of Bowland is a valley and high pass in the Forest of Bowland Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, Lancashire, England.

Contents

The pass, reaching 968 ft (295 m) above sea level at the head of the valley, links to Wyresdale, dividing the upland core of Bowland into two main blocks. Though steep and narrow, the road is the most direct connection between Lancaster and Dunsop Bridge, and hence Clitheroe. It was the route taken by the "Pendle witches" to their trial at Lancaster Castle in 1612. [1] The Grey Stone of Trough, at the head of the pass, marks the line of the pre-1974 county boundary between Lancashire and the West Riding of Yorkshire. Historically, the Trough marked the westernmost boundary of the ancient Lordship of Bowland.

Definition

The Trough is scenic and popular with visitors, particularly walkers and cyclists, and it is sometimes considered synonymous with the Forest of Bowland as a whole. However, it is only a small part of the wider Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty at 312 sq mi (810 km2). [2]

The Ordnance Survey indicates the Trough of Bowland to be solely the steep upper valley of Losterdale Brook above Trough Barn. However, the generally used definition includes:

Land usage

The Trough is very sparsely populated: there are only two farms on the Langden side (Sykes and Hareden), and, in Wyresdale, the small community of Marshaw. All feature Grade II listed buildings.

Evidence of past industrial use remains in the form of a disused roadside lime kiln and several quarry scars. What is believed to be the former location of the Sykes Smelt Mill is now the headquarters of the Bowland Pennine Mountain Rescue Team.

Water is abstracted from the main streams of the Trough to supply the city of Preston. Water intakes were built at the mouths of Hareden, Losterdale and Langden Brooks in the 1920s, linked by a series of aqueducts to the Alston Reservoirs near Longridge. [3] The water intakes are now operated by United Utilities from their office at Stocks board house

Related Research Articles

Forest of Bowland

The Forest of Bowland, also known as the Bowland Fells and formerly the Chase of Bowland, is an area of gritstone fells, deep valleys and peat moorland, mostly in north-east Lancashire, England, with a small part in North Yorkshire. It is a western outlier of the Pennines.

Ribble Valley Borough in England

Ribble Valley is a local government district with borough status within the non-metropolitan county of Lancashire, England. The total population of the non-metropolitan district at the 2011 Census was 57,132. Its council is based in Clitheroe. Other places include Whalley, Longridge and Ribchester. The area is so called due to the River Ribble which flows in its final stages towards its estuary near Preston. The area is popular with tourists who enjoy the area's natural unspoilt beauty, much of which lies within the Forest of Bowland.

Abbeystead Human settlement in England

Abbeystead is a small hamlet located in the Forest of Bowland Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, in Lancashire, England. Abbeystead lies close to the Trough of Bowland but even in medieval times, was considered part of Wyresdale rather than within the domain of that powerful local magnate, the Lord of Bowland, so-called Lord of the Fells. Abbeystead is located in the civil and ecclesiastical parish of Over Wyresdale.

Dunsop Bridge Human settlement in England

Dunsop Bridge is a village in the Borough of Ribble Valley, Lancashire, England, 9 miles (14 km) north-west of Clitheroe, 15 miles (24 km) south-east of Lancaster and 24.5 miles (39 km) west of Skipton. It is in the civil parish of Bowland Forest High. Historically, the village is part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, but was placed under the administration of Lancashire County Council on 1 April 1974.

Quernmore Human settlement in England

Quernmore is a village and civil parish in the City of Lancaster in Lancashire, England. It is located about 3 miles (5 km) east of Lancaster. The parish of Quernmore had a population of 532 recorded in the 2001 census, increasing to 567 at the 2011 Census. Apart from Quernmore itself, the parish also includes Brow Top, once a local crafts mecca, now merely a cluster of barn conversions, like a last outpost of civilisation before the Trough of Bowland.

Barley-with-Wheatley Booth Human settlement in England

Barley-with-Wheatley Booth is a civil parish in the Pendle district of Lancashire, England. It has a population of 298, and contains the village of Barley and the hamlet of White Hough or Whitehough. To the west of Barley is Pendle Hill; its summit, at 557 metres (1,827 ft), is within the parish.

Slaidburn Human settlement in England

Slaidburn is a village and civil parish within the Ribble Valley district of Lancashire, England. The parish covers just over 5,000 acres of the Forest of Bowland.

Bowland Forest High Human settlement in England

Bowland Forest High is a civil parish in the Ribble Valley district of Lancashire, England, covering some 20,000 acres (80 km2) of the Forest of Bowland. According to the 2001 census, the parish had a population of 163, falling to 144 at the 2011 Census. The parish includes the settlements of Hareden, Sykes, and Dunsop Bridge. It covers Sykes Fell, Whins Brow, Croasdale Fell and Wolfhole Crag. Before 1974, it formed part of Bowland Rural District in the West Riding of Yorkshire.

River Hodder River in Lancashire, England

The River Hodder is in Lancashire, England. It is a County Biological Heritage Site.

River Dunsop

The River Dunsop is a river in the Forest of Bowland in Northern England. It flows into the River Hodder at Dunsop Bridge.

River Calder, Wyre River in Lancashire, England

The River Calder is a 13-mile (21 km) long river that is one of the main tributaries of the River Wyre in Lancashire, England. Like the other rivers in England with the name Calder, its name is thought to derive from a mixture of Old Welsh and Old British words meaning "hard and violent water or stream".

Sabden Human settlement in England

Sabden is a village and civil parish in the Ribble Valley, Lancashire, England. Sabden is located south of Pendle Hill, in a valley about three miles north west of Padiham. The parish covers 2,450.9 acres (991.85 ha), of which 103.2 acres (41.75 ha) is occupied by the village. It lies in the Forest of Pendle section of the Forest of Bowland Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

Whitewell Human settlement in England

Whitewell is a village within the civil parish of Bowland Forest Low and Ribble Valley borough of Lancashire, England. It is in the Forest of Bowland Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Historically, the village is part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, but was transferred to Lancashire for administrative purposes on 1 April 1974, under the provisions of the Local Government Act 1972. It stands above a bend in the River Hodder.

Pendleton, Lancashire Human settlement in England

Pendleton is a small village and civil parish in Ribble Valley, within the county of Lancashire, England. It is close to the towns of Whalley and Clitheroe. The parish lies on the north west side of Pendle Hill below the Nick o' Pendle. The village is just off the A59, Liverpool to York main road, since the construction of the Clitheroe By-Pass. Older roads through the parish include one from Clitheroe to Whalley which passes through the Standen area and another to Burnley which passes Pendleton Hall.

Goldshaw Booth Human settlement in England

Goldshaw Booth is a civil parish in the Pendle district of Lancashire, England. It has a population of 248, and contains the village of Newchurch in Pendle and the hamlets of Spen Brook and Sabden Fold. Pendle Hill lies to the north.

Abbeystead House

Abbeystead House is a large country house to the east of the village of Abbeystead, Lancashire, England, some 12 km south-east of Lancaster. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building.

Mearley Human settlement in England

Mearley is a civil parish in Lancashire, England. The parish is north-west of Pendle Hill, east of Clitheroe, and is in the Ribble Valley district. It is a small parish with no villages or hamlets and a population of 25, the second smallest in Lancashire, at the 2001 census. It has no parish council, but instead has a parish meeting shared with neighbouring Worston. From the 2011 Census population information for both Mearley and Worston is included within the civil parish of Pendleton, giving a total of 349. The eastern part of the parish is included in the Pendle outlier section of the Forest of Bowland Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB).

Forest of Pendle Hilly area in eastern Lancashire, England

The Forest of Pendle is the name given to an area of hilly landscape to the east of Pendle Hill in eastern Lancashire, roughly defining the watershed between the River Ribble and its tributary the River Calder. The forest is not identical to the modern local government district of Pendle, which is larger. And in fact the modern version of the forest has come to contain areas to the north and east of Pendle Hill which are partly in the district of Ribble Valley.

Lancashire Witches Walk Long-distance footpath in Lancashire, England

The Lancashire Witches Walk is a 51-mile (82 km) long-distance footpath opened in 2012, between Barrowford and Lancaster, all in Lancashire, England. It starts at Pendle Heritage Centre in Barrowford before passing through the Forest of Pendle, the town of Clitheroe and the Forest of Bowland to finish at Lancaster Castle.

Langden Brook Water course in Lancashire, England

Langden Brook is a watercourse in the Trough of Bowland, Lancashire, England. A tributary of the River Hodder, its source is near the summit of Hawthornthwaite Fell, which has an elevation of 479 m (1,572 ft). From there, it flows down the fell's southern face, before turning northeast for around 2.5 miles (4.0 km). At Sykes, in Bowland Forest High, it turns southeast for about 2 miles (3.2 km), joining the Hodder a short distance later, about 0.5 miles (0.80 km) south of Dunsop Bridge.

References

  1. Marsh, Terry (2008), Walking in the Forest of Bowland and Pendle, Cicerone Press, ISBN   978-1852845155, p.70
  2. "Forest of Bowland AONB". VisitLancashire.com. Retrieved 12 May 2014.
  3. "Intakes". Mike's Aqueduct Site. Archived from the original on 28 March 2012. Retrieved 12 May 2014.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)

Coordinates: 53°58′09″N2°34′15″W / 53.969214°N 2.570829°W / 53.969214; -2.570829