Timeline of Guangzhou

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The following is a timeline of the history of the Chinese city of Guangzhou, also formerly known as Panyu,[ citation needed ] Canton, and Kwang-chow. [1] [2]

Contents

Nanyue

"History of China" for template heading.svg
ANCIENT
Neolithic c. 8500 – c. 2070 BC
Xia c. 2070 – c. 1600 BC
Shang c. 1600 – c. 1046 BC
Zhou c. 1046 – 256 BC
  Western Zhou
  Eastern Zhou
    Spring and Autumn
    Warring States
IMPERIAL
Qin 221–207 BC
Han 202 BC – 220 AD
  Western Han
  Xin
  Eastern Han
Three Kingdoms 220–280
  Wei , Shu and Wu
Jin 266–420
  Western Jin
  Eastern Jin Sixteen Kingdoms
Northern and Southern dynasties
420–589
Sui 581–618
Tang 618–907
Five Dynasties and
Ten Kingdoms

907–979
Liao
916–1125
Western Xia
1038–1227
Jin
1115–1234
Song 960–1279
  Northern Song
  Southern Song
Yuan 1271–1368
Ming 1368–1644
Qing 1636–1912
MODERN
Republic of China on the mainland 1912–1949
People's Republic of China 1949–present
Republic of China in Taiwan 1949–present

Imperial China

View of Canton with merchant ship of the Dutch East India Company, c. 1665 AMH-6145-NA View of Canton.jpg
View of Canton with merchant ship of the Dutch East India Company, c. 1665
Painting of the Thirteen Factories c. 1820, with flags of Denmark, Spain, the U.S., Sweden, Britain, and the Netherlands Hongs at Canton.jpg
Painting of the Thirteen Factories c.1820, with flags of Denmark, Spain, the U.S., Sweden, Britain, and the Netherlands

Republic of China

People's Republic of China

See also

Notes

  1. EB (1878), p. 37.
  2. EB (1911), p. 218.
  3. IDHP (1996).
  4. ArchNet.org. "Guangzhou". USA: MIT School of Architecture and Planning. Archived from the original on 7 October 2012. Retrieved 14 March 2013.
  5. Szczesniak (1956).
  6. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Webster's (1960).
  7. Hiromasa (1986).
  8. Chronologies (1990), "Fires".
  9. 1 2 "Guangzhou Newspapers", WorldCat, Online Computer Library Center , retrieved 14 March 2013
  10. Slade, John (1835), Canton Register, Vol. VIII
  11. 1 2 3 Farris (2007).
  12. Keswick (2003).
  13. 1 2 Lo & al. (1977).
  14. Dictionary of the CCP (2012), p.  15.
  15. Paulès (2009).
  16. Dirlik (1997).
  17. CCAHC (2000).
  18. "Garden Search: China". London: Botanic Gardens Conservation International . Retrieved 30 September 2015.
  19. United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Statistical Office (1976). "Population of capital city and cities of 100,000 and more inhabitants". Demographic Yearbook 1975. New York. pp. 253–279. Canton
  20. "部分年份城乡人口分布", 广东省志:人口志 (in Chinese), Local Records Office of Guangdong, retrieved 4 August 2011
  21. "Sister Cities of Los Angeles". City of Los Angeles. Retrieved 30 December 2015.
  22. Lam (2007).
  23. United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Statistical Office (1987). "Population of capital cities and cities of 100,000 and more inhabitants". 1985 Demographic Yearbook. New York. pp. 247–289.
  24. "Guangzhou", China, Lonely Planet , retrieved 14 March 2013
  25. Kristof, Nicholas (3 May 1992), "Guangzhou: Let a Thousand Lipsticks Bloom", New York Times
  26. 1 2 广州市商业网点发展规划主报告(2003—2012) (PDF), Beijing: Department of Market System Development, Chinese Ministry of Commerce, retrieved 4 August 2011
  27. UN (2005).
  28. "China". Art Spaces Directory. New York: New Museum . Retrieved 2 December 2013.
  29. Komanoff, Charles (15 March 2010), "Postcard From a Guangzhou Traffic Jam", New York Times
  30. World Health Organization (2016), Global Urban Ambient Air Pollution Database, Geneva, archived from the original on March 28, 2014

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References

Attribution This article incorporates information from the Chinese Wikipedia, Dutch Wikipedia, and the Japanese Wikipedia.

Coordinates: 23°08′00″N113°16′00″E / 23.133333°N 113.266667°E / 23.133333; 113.266667