Timeline of Seattle

Last updated

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Seattle, Washington, USA.

Contents

Before the 19th century

19th century

20th century

1900s–1940s

1950s–1990s

21st century

See also

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Puget Sound</span> Deep water sound of the Salish Sea in northwestern Washington, United States

Puget Sound is a sound of the Pacific Northwest, an inlet of the Pacific Ocean, and part of the Salish Sea. It is located along the northwestern coast of the U.S. state of Washington. It is a complex estuarine system of interconnected marine waterways and basins, with one major and two minor connections to the open Pacific Ocean via the Strait of Juan de Fuca—Admiralty Inlet being the major connection and Deception Pass and Swinomish Channel being the minor.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Edmonds, Washington</span> City in Washington, United States

Edmonds is a city in Snohomish County, Washington, United States. It is located in the southwest corner of the county, facing Puget Sound and the Olympic Mountains to the west. The city is part of the Seattle metropolitan area and is located 15 miles (24 km) north of Seattle and 18 miles (29 km) southwest of Everett. With a population of 42,853 residents in the 2020 U.S. census, Edmonds is the third most populous city in the county.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Mukilteo, Washington</span> City in Washington, United States

Mukilteo is a city in Snohomish County, Washington, United States. It is located on the Puget Sound between Edmonds and Everett, approximately 25 miles (40 km) north of Seattle. The city had a population of 20,254 at the 2010 census and an estimated 2019 population of 21,441.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Vulcan Inc.</span> American company

Vulcan LLC is a privately held company founded by the Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen and his sister Jody Allen in 1986 to establish and oversee the family's diverse business activities and philanthropic endeavors. It includes Vulcan Real Estate, the Paul G. Allen Estate and Trust, and advises the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation. Vulcan LLC is headquartered in Seattle, Washington.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Transportation in Seattle</span> Overview of transportation modes and routes in Seattle, Washington, U.S.

Transportation in Seattle is largely focused on the automobile like many other cities in western North America; however, the city is just old enough for its layout to reflect the age when railways and trolleys predominated. These older modes of transportation were made for a relatively well-defined downtown area and strong neighborhoods at the end of several former streetcar lines, now mostly bus lines.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">South Lake Union Streetcar</span> Streetcar line in Seattle, Washington

The South Lake Union Streetcar, officially the South Lake Union Line, is a streetcar route in Seattle, Washington, United States, forming part of the Seattle Streetcar system. It travels 1.3 miles (2.1 km) and connects Downtown Seattle to the South Lake Union neighborhood on Westlake Avenue, Terry Avenue, and Valley Street. The South Lake Union Streetcar was the first modern line to operate in Seattle, beginning service on December 12, 2007, two years after a separate heritage streetcar ceased operations.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Seattle</span> Largest city in Washington, United States

Seattle is a seaport city on the West Coast of the United States. It is the seat of King County, Washington. With a 2022 population of 749,256 it is the most populous city in both the state of Washington and the Pacific Northwest region of North America. The Seattle metropolitan area's population is 4.02 million, making it the 15th-largest in the United States. Its growth rate of 21.1% between 2010 and 2020 made it one of the country's fastest-growing large cities.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Washington (state)</span> U.S. state

Washington, officially the State of Washington, is a state in the Pacific Northwest region of the Western United States. Named for George Washington—the first U.S. president—the state was formed from the western part of the Washington Territory, which was ceded by the British Empire in 1846, by the Oregon Treaty in the settlement of the Oregon boundary dispute. The state is bordered on the west by the Pacific Ocean, Oregon to the south, Idaho to the east, and the Canadian province of British Columbia to the north. It was admitted to the Union as the 42nd state in 1889. Olympia is the state capital. The state's most populous city is Seattle.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Everett, Washington</span> City in Washington, United States

Everett is the county seat and largest city of Snohomish County, Washington, United States. It is 25 miles (40 km) north of Seattle and is one of the main cities in the metropolitan area and the Puget Sound region. Everett is the seventh-largest city in the state by population, with 110,629 residents as of the 2020 census. The city is primarily situated on a peninsula at the mouth of the Snohomish River along Port Gardner Bay, an inlet of Possession Sound, and extends to the south and west.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">First Hill Streetcar</span> Streetcar line in Seattle, Washington

The First Hill Streetcar, officially the First Hill Line, is a streetcar route in Seattle, Washington, United States, forming part of the modern Seattle Streetcar system. It travels 2.5 miles (4.0 km) between several neighborhoods in central Seattle, including the International District, First Hill, and Capitol Hill. The line has ten stops and runs primarily in mixed traffic on South Jackson Street and Broadway.

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Atlanta, Georgia, United States.

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of San Francisco, California, United States.

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Austin, Texas, USA.

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Columbus, Ohio, United States.

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of St. Louis, Missouri, United States.

The following is a general historical timeline of the city of Los Angeles, California in the United States of America.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Electricity in the Puget Sound region</span> Overview of the electricity sector in the Puget Sound region

Electricity in the Puget Sound region is a significant factor in people's lives, an enabler for the modern economy, and has a unique relationship with the region's environment.

The following is a timeline of the history of Washington state in the United States.

References

  1. 1 2 3 Elenga 2007, p. 21.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Britannica 1910.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Federal Writers' Project 1941, p. 209, "Seattle".
  4. 1 2 3 Kueter 2001.
  5. 1 2 3 4 "US Newspaper Directory". Chronicling America. Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress. Archived from the original on April 7, 2014. Retrieved October 21, 2013.
  6. "Washington: King", Pacific States Newspaper Directory (6th ed.), San Francisco: Palmer & Rey, 1894, OCLC   35801625
  7. 1 2 Davies Project. "American Libraries before 1876". Princeton University. Archived from the original on March 2, 2015. Retrieved October 21, 2013.
  8. Tanaka 2001.
  9. "Mobs forcibly expel most of Seattle". www.historylink.org. Archived from the original on 2021-04-26. Retrieved 2021-04-26.
  10. 1 2 "Finding Aids". Northwest Digital Archives . Archived from the original on October 21, 2013. Retrieved October 21, 2013.
  11. Ochsner & Andersen 2002.
  12. "Seattle Transportation: From Trolleys to Monorails, A Timeline". HistoryLink . Seattle. Archived from the original on October 7, 2014. Retrieved June 30, 2014.
  13. 1 2 Bagley 1916.
  14. 1 2 3 4 "Movie Theaters in Seattle, WA". CinemaTreasures.org. Los Angeles: Cinema Treasures LLC. Archived from the original on May 4, 2014. Retrieved October 21, 2013.
  15. Egan, Timothy (2012). Short nights of the Shadow Catcher: the epic life and immortal photographs of Edward Curtis . Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. pp.  370. ISBN   978-0618969029.
  16. Chronicling American, Library of Congress Website
  17. 1 2 Raymer 1913.
  18. Chamber of Commerce 1903.
  19. Blackford 1980.
  20. American Library Annual, 1917–1918. New York: R.R. Bowker Co. 1918. pp. 7 v. Archived from the original on 2014-12-25. Retrieved 2013-10-22.
  21. "Puget Sound Ports". Archived from the original on 2015-05-19. Retrieved 2017-02-12.
  22. "Our History". Seattle: Municipal League Foundation. Archived from the original on October 23, 2013. Retrieved October 21, 2013.
  23. 1 2 "History: Timeline". Port of Seattle. Archived from the original on September 16, 2016. Retrieved September 16, 2016.
  24. 1 2 3 Taylor 1991.
  25. 150 Most Influential People in Seattle/King County History 2001.
  26. 1 2 3 Mikala Woodward (2011), Timeline of Southeast Seattle History, archived from the original on June 24, 2014, retrieved June 30, 2014
  27. Aaron Brenner; Benjamin Day; Immanuel Ness, eds. (2015) [2009]. "Timeline". Encyclopedia of Strikes in American History. Routledge. ISBN   978-1-317-45707-7. Archived from the original on 2017-03-29. Retrieved 2016-09-15.
  28. "About Us". Seattle Goodwill. Archived from the original on November 2, 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013.
  29. Mike Tigas and Sisi Wei, ed. (9 May 2013). "Seattle, Washington". Nonprofit Explorer. New York: ProPublica. Archived from the original on October 27, 2021. Retrieved October 31, 2013.
  30. "American Association of Community Theatre". Archived from the original on December 6, 2013. Retrieved November 6, 2013.
  31. "On This Day", New York Times, archived from the original on November 5, 2020, retrieved November 30, 2014
  32. Park 2007.
  33. 1 2 3 "About SAM: History Timeline". Seattle Art Museum. Archived from the original on October 23, 2013. Retrieved October 21, 2013.
  34. "Vedanta Society of Western Washington". Seattle. Archived from the original on February 18, 1999. Retrieved October 21, 2013.
  35. 1 2 Pluralism Project. "Seattle, Washington". Directory of Religious Centers. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University. Archived from the original on October 23, 2013. Retrieved October 21, 2013.
  36. 1 2 3 Leon E. Seltzer, ed. (1952), Columbia Lippincott Gazetteer of the World, New York: Columbia University Press, p. 1724, OL   6112221M
  37. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 "Seattle's 21 Sister Cities". City of Seattle. Archived from the original on October 2, 2015. Retrieved December 30, 2015.
  38. "History of PSRC". Puget Sound Regional Council. 2011. Archived from the original on November 2, 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013.
  39. 1 2 Population of the 100 Largest Cities and Other Urban Places in the United States: 1790 to 1990, US Census Bureau, 1998, archived from the original on 2017-09-02, retrieved 2017-12-10
  40. "History of the Seattle Center: A Timeline", Seattle Magazine, 2012, archived from the original on July 1, 2014, retrieved June 30, 2014
  41. "AIA Seattle History: Timeline 1894–1994". AIA Seattle. Archived from the original on October 23, 2013. Retrieved October 21, 2013.
  42. Joan Singler. "Timeline: Seattle CORE 1961–1968". University of Washington, Seattle Civil Rights and Labor History Project. Archived from the original on June 13, 2014. Retrieved June 30, 2014.
  43. "About Us: Event Timeline". Seattle Repertory Theatre. Archived from the original on April 23, 2014. Retrieved June 30, 2014.
  44. James Trager (1995), The Food Chronology, New York: Henry Holt, OL   1275146M
  45. Sreenivasan 2009.
  46. Nina Luttinger; Gregory Dicum (1999). "Historic Timeline". The Coffee Book: Anatomy of an Industry from Crop to the Last Drop. New Press. ISBN   978-1-59558-724-4. Archived from the original on 2016-06-03. Retrieved 2015-12-23.
  47. "Seattle Seahawks Team History | Pro Football Hall of Fame Official Site". www.profootballhof.com. Archived from the original on 2019-12-21. Retrieved 2019-12-15.
  48. Steven Anzovin and Janet Podell, ed. (2000). Famous First Facts. H.W. Wilson Co. ISBN   0824209583.
  49. Thrush 2009.
  50. "Mariners Timeline". Major League Baseball Advanced Media. Archived from the original on March 4, 2015. Retrieved June 30, 2014.
  51. "NCGA Co-ops: Washington". Iowa: National Cooperative Grocers Association. Archived from the original on 2013-11-04. Retrieved 2013-11-02.
  52. "About". Seattle: P-Patch Trust. Archived from the original on July 18, 2012. Retrieved October 21, 2013.
  53. 1 2 "Seattle Music Scene Timeline". Cleveland, Ohio: Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on September 12, 2014. Retrieved June 30, 2014.
  54. 1 2 "Seattle". Hackerspaces. Archived from the original on March 15, 2015. Retrieved November 9, 2013.
  55. Civic Impulse, LLC. "Members of Congress". GovTrack . Washington, D.C. Archived from the original on April 11, 2017. Retrieved April 2, 2014.
  56. Office of Film + Music. "Seattle Film History Timeline". City of Seattle. Archived from the original on June 25, 2014. Retrieved June 30, 2014.
  57. "Seattle's PAN makes debut", Seattle Times, December 18, 1994
  58. "City of Seattle adds the Web to its information onramps", Seattle Times, February 5, 1995
  59. "Seattle Public Access Network". Archived from the original on 1996-12-18 via Internet Archive, Wayback Machine.
  60. Seattle Channel. "1997–98 Annual Report". City of Seattle. Archived from the original on April 8, 2014. Retrieved May 4, 2014.
  61. Pam Sitt (October 2000). "Rocket's nose dive stuns music magazine's staffers". Seattle Times. Archived from the original on 2014-09-12. Retrieved 2014-09-12.
  62. "Frequently Asked Questions About Kavana". Kavana Cooperative. Archived from the original on October 23, 2013. Retrieved October 21, 2013.
  63. Seattle Times Staff (December 12, 2007). "Streetcar starts service". The Seattle Times . Archived from the original on June 4, 2011. Retrieved January 25, 2016.
  64. "Link light rail launches new era of mobility for central Puget Sound" (Press release). Seattle: Sound Transit. July 18, 2009. Archived from the original on March 3, 2016. Retrieved May 19, 2015.
  65. "Sound Transit opens Link light rail service to SeaTac" (Press release). Seattle: Sound Transit. December 19, 2009. Archived from the original on February 3, 2016. Retrieved May 19, 2015.
  66. Nieman Journalism Lab. "Encyclo: an Encyclopedia of the Future of News". Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University. Archived from the original on March 20, 2014. Retrieved March 23, 2014.
  67. Matthew Halverson (April 28, 2011), "Beacon Hill Unplugged", SeattleMet , archived from the original on July 1, 2014, retrieved June 30, 2014
  68. "Gigabit Seattle pricing revealed — less than Comcast, more than Google", Seattle Times, June 24, 2013, archived from the original on November 5, 2013, retrieved November 2, 2013
  69. "Seattle (city), Washington". State & County QuickFacts. U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on March 27, 2014. Retrieved April 2, 2014.
  70. "Largest Urbanized Areas With Selected Cities and Metro Areas (2010)". US Census Bureau. 2012. Archived from the original on 2018-07-18. Retrieved 2017-12-10.
  71. "About". Seattle Shorts. Archived from the original on May 4, 2014. Retrieved May 4, 2014.
  72. "About Us". Seattle: Citizen University. Archived from the original on May 4, 2014. Retrieved May 4, 2014.
  73. "Is It Time to Bag the Plastic?", New York Times, May 18, 2013, archived from the original on December 18, 2016, retrieved February 28, 2017
  74. "The 15 Cities with the Largest Numeric Increase from July 1, 2012 to July 1, 2013" (PDF). US Census Bureau. 2014. Archived (PDF) from the original on September 24, 2015. Retrieved December 10, 2017. Vintage 2013 Population Estimates
  75. "Seattle Seahawks' Super Bowl victory parade draws some 700,000 fans", Reuters, February 5, 2014, archived from the original on August 21, 2016, retrieved July 5, 2021
  76. Eric Liu (May 2, 2014). "United Cities of America: What Seattle's Minimum-Wage Deal Means". The Atlantic . Archived from the original on June 8, 2017. Retrieved March 12, 2017.
  77. Some cities are still more unequal than others—an update, Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution, March 17, 2015, archived from the original on April 7, 2015, retrieved May 2, 2015
  78. "'Paddle in Seattle' Arctic oil drilling protest", BBC News, May 17, 2015, archived from the original on June 8, 2015, retrieved June 21, 2018
  79. "Why the long holiday continues in Seattle", The Economist , September 15, 2015, archived from the original on March 6, 2016, retrieved July 13, 2017
  80. "First Hill streetcar opens". KING-TV. January 23, 2016. Archived from the original on 2016-01-25. Retrieved 2016-01-25.
  81. Best, Paul (21 February 2023). "Seattle becomes first US city to ban discrimination based on caste". Fox News.
  82. Federal Writers' Project 1941, "Chronology".

Bibliography

Published in the 19th century

Published in the 20th century

Published in the 21st century

Images

47°36′35″N122°19′59″W / 47.609722°N 122.333056°W / 47.609722; -122.333056